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Viewing: NTR 302 : Introduction to Nutrition Research, Communication, and Careers

Last approved: Tue, 15 Mar 2016 18:17:00 GMT

Last edit: Tue, 15 Mar 2016 18:17:00 GMT

Change Type
NTR (Nutrition)
302
032305
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
Introduction to Nutrition Research, Communication, and Careers
Intro to Nutrition Research
College of Agriculture and Life Sciences
Food Bioprocessing and Nutrition (11FS)
Term Offering
Fall, Spring and Summer
Offered Every Year
Fall 2016
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3
Course Attribute(s)


If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Dr. Christopher Daubert
Department Head

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture7575NoNone
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote
Prerequisite: NTR 301
Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
Yes
SIS Program CodeProgram TitleRequired or Elective?
11NTSANApplied NutritionRequired
11NTSBSNutrition ScienceRequired
This course exposes students to scientific literature, communication, and careers in the field of nutrition. Students will learn how to critically evaluate scientific literature and communicate that information both orally and in writing. Course topics include: research design, nutritional epidemiology, statistics, scientific writing, professionalism, and current nutrition-related "hot topics." Class time will be a combination of lecture and small or large group discussions and individual or group in-class assignments. Student evaluations include in-class assignments, writing assignments, oral presentations, and exams.

This new course is designed to address three issues in students' knowledge and skills:​



  • Limited critical and creative thinking skills: This required course will extend the learning outcomes of the LSC 101, LSC 103, and NTR 301 courses to provide Nutrition majors with opportunities to continue to build critical and creative thinking skills related to discipline-specific knowledge.

  • Lack of understanding of the types of nutrition research, including their associated strengths and limitations: This required course will provide all Nutrition majors with an introduction to study design and statistics in nutrition, and students will evaluate the scientific literature to evaluate the strengths and limitations of studies. Using examples of how the media can misconstrue information, students will recognize the importance of understanding and communicating key findings from research studies.

  • Limited experience reading and interpreting original research: Depending on a student's choice of current electives, students may not have an opportunity to read and interpret original research. This course will provide all students with that opportunity in preparation for writing-intensive upper-level elective courses. Additionally, new curriculum changes will require students to take a course designated as a writing-intensive upper-level Nutrition elective, so this course will serve as a foundation for all Nutrition majors.


No

Is this a GEP Course?
No
GEP Categories

Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 

 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 

 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 

 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 

Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 

 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 

 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 

Dr. Christopher Daubert, Department Head of Food, Bioprocessing, and Nutrition Sciences will serve as the contact for the course.

The goal of NTR 302 is to provide all nutrition majors with an understanding of the scientific literature and practice communicating findings to the scientific community and lay public. Through this course, students will learn to critically evaluate primary literature in a variety of nutrition-related "hot topics" to serve as a foundation for writing-intensive elective courses in the major.


Student Learning Outcomes

At the end of this course, students will be able to:

1. Identify key characteristics of different types of studies (ecological, cross-sectional, case v. control, cohort, randomized controlled trial, meta-analysis/systematic review) conducted in nutrition.

2. Explain principles of epidemiology and statistics needed to evaluate scientific literature.

3. Manipulate search engines to locate scientific literature in nutrition.

4. Compare and contrast findings reported in primary literature and those reported by popular media, such as newspapers, magazines and online news sources.

5. Demonstrate critical thinking skills by engaging with the complexity of diet-disease relationships and other "hot topics" in nutrition.

6. Explain the strengths and limitations of the translation of basic nutrition research to policy and public health recommendations.

7. Demonstrate scientific writing and oral communication skills by interpreting scientific literature for the lay public and scientific audiences.

8. Describe career opportunities and skills needed to be a successful professional.


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Participation120In-class Assignments: Over the course of the semester, students will complete 27 short, in-class assignments. Some in-class assignments are to be done individually while others will require group collaboration. At the end of class, each student must turn in his or her own in-class assignment, and assignments will be graded for completion to count as participation/attendance points. Students may miss up to 3 in-class assignments without penalty. If students complete all 27 in-class assignments, then they can earn up to 1.5 points extra credit towards their final grade.
Essay90Reflection Papers: Over the course of the semester, students will write three reflection papers. The first two will be about movies that they will be required to watch out of class: "Fed Up" and "Forks Over Knives." The third reflection paper will have them synthesize information they learned during the semester, reflecting on a topic that they thought they understood before becoming a nutrition major and specific details about what they know now that conflicts with their previous knowledge.
Written Assignment100Annotated Bibliography & Literature Summary: Students will be given a packet of scientific journal articles on a specific topic. They are to read the articles and complete an annotated bibliography and literature summary paragraph. For the annotated bibliography, for each article they will provide (1) the citation for the study, (2) authors' reason(s) for doing the study, (3) objective(s) of the study, (4) primary end point(s) being measured relevant to the study's objective(s), (5) who was studied, (6) basic type of study, (7) principle findings specific to the objectives, (8) authors' conclusions, and (9) summary statement. Students will then write a one-page, double spaced summary paragraph in which they weave together the studies using scientific language and only the most important information. This is the same format used in other courses in the major (NTR 419, NTR 410, and NTR 490).
presentation140To explore the translation from primary source to popular news article, you will find an article published in a popular newspaper, magazine, or online news source, covering a nutrition-related topic. Using the information in the article, you will track down the primary source of the research article. After reading the primary source, you will edit the news article to make it more accurate. You will then present a 3-minute PowerPoint presentation in class in which you compare and contrast the primary source and the news article, highlight edits you made to the news article. Before class on the day of your presentation, you will submit on Moodle: (1) the original news article, (2) the primary research article, and (3) the edited news article with written justification of edits.
Multiple exams500Exam 1 will be worth 175 points. Exam 2 will be worth 175 points. The Cumulative Final Exam will be worth 200 points. All exams will be a combination of multiple choice, short answer, and essay. Exam content will focus on both information discussed in class and critical analysis of journal articles related to information discussed in class.
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
Course Introduction1 lecture• Lecture: Review syllabus and discuss course expectations
• In-class activity 1: Students will read “Science is often flawed. It’s time we embraced that” and in small groups, complete a guided worksheet to reflect on how this article relates to the course
• Homework: Read “You Can’t Trust What You Read About Nutrition”
Know Your Source1 lecture• Lecture: How to find evidenced-based information
• In-class activity 2: In groups (1) determine a nutrition-related topic and (2) complete a guided worksheet that instructs them to visit different websites and (3) report on the information they find.
• Homework: Watch Lecture 1 – Anatomy of a Published Research Study
Anatomy of a Published Research Study1 lecture• In-class activity 3: Students break off into small groups and review a series of research publications, completing a worksheet that guides them to compare and contrast
• Discussion: Student groups report on their articles, summarizing the key points and comparing and contrasting the information provided in each study.
• Introduce Annotated Bibliographies assignment
• Homework: Watch Lecture 2 - Complexity of Diet-Disease Relationships
Diet-Disease Relationships1 lecture• In-class activity 4: Student groups will be given different diet-disease relationships and asked to plan a research study to explore the relationship.
• Discussion: Each group will present, and we will critique their studies.
• Homework: Watch Lecture 3 - Non-randomized studies & Lecture 4 - Controlled Trails
Study Designs1 lecture• In-class activity 5: Using the information learned from the lectures on study designs, student groups will revise their research studies.
• Discussion: Each group will present their changes, and we will discuss common themes among groups.
• Homework: Lecture 5 – Statistics
Statistics - Part 11 lecture• Lecture: As a group, we will look at the ways that different studies report their findings, focusing on statistics reported and the format chosen to present.
• In-class activity 6: In groups, students will practice calculating different statistics, building on information that they would have learned in ST 311.
Statistics - Part 21 lecture• Discussion: As a group, we will look at the ways that different studies report their findings, focusing on statistics reported and the format chosen to present.
• In-class activity 7: In groups, students will practice calculating different statistics, building on information that they would have learned in ST 311.
Scientific Writing - Part 11 lecture• Lecture: We will explore the basics of scientific writing including tone, structure, cutting the clutter, avoiding plagiarism, and common grammatical and stylistic mistakes.
• In-class activity 8: Students will work individually to edit a series of paragraphs
Scientific Writing - Part 21 lecture• Discussion: We will discuss the edits students made to the paragraphs and answer any questions related to the Annotated Bibliography and Literature Summary Assignment.
• In-class activity 9: Students will submit one question they have about the Annotated Bibliography and Literature Summary assignment.
Scientific Discovery in Nutrition: History of the Discovery of Vitamins1 lecture• Lecture: We will discuss the history of nutrition research through the lens of vitamin discovery. Using Ch 2 from Combs’ Vitamins text, we will discuss the zig-zag pattern of the discovery of vitamins. At key points in the lecture, students will guess what the researchers determined based on the scientific evidence presented.
• In-class activity 10: At the end of class they will turn in a one-page schematic or timeline they will create based on the lecture.
History of the Dietary Guidelines1 lecture• In-class activity 11: Students will receive a copy of the history of dietary recommendations related to fats and then ask them to predict the food industry’s response to each of the recommendations
• Discussion: As a group we will discuss their predictions and look at the statistics (rel. risk and endpoints and limitations). We will talk about the barriers and challenges (e.g., where does the $$ come from to provide the subsidies? Who is going to lobby hard against some of these policies and why might they have a lot of influence?)
Nutrition Messages in the Media1 lecture• In-class activity 12: Students will take 5 minutes to write a paragraph on their role as nutrition professionals responding to nutrition in the media and turn in before the discussion.
• Discussion: As a group, we will discuss how nutrition is portrayed in the media and what their role as nutrition professionals is in responding to nutrition in the media. We will highlight credible sources to fact-check information. In-class activity 11: Students will complete an individual reflection paragraph on their role as nutrition professionals responding to nutrition in the media and turn in before the discussion.
• Homework: Watch “Fed-Up” and take notes on information that is confusing or incorrect. http://www.amazon.com/Fed-Up-Katie-Couric/dp/B00MRHFA72
"Fed Up" Movie Discussion1 lecture• Discussion: Students will have watched the movie before coming to class. We discuss key points in the movie, highlighting what the scientific literature says and why the messages might have been misconstrued. “What the film got wrong” - https://www.sciencebasedmedicine.org/does-the-movie-fed-up-make-sense/
• In-class activity 13: Students will turn in a list of 5 take-aways from the discussion
Diets in the Media1 lecture• Lecture: Present different fad diets and dieting trends that have been popular over time, discussing what is wrong about claims, why individuals latch on to these trends, and what their role is in addressing these diets with friends, family, and clients.
• In-class activity 14: Students will be given a series of bad information that they might receive from a client. They would need to (1) tell why it is wrong in scientific terms and (2) explain in lay-terms what is a better approach.
• Introduce “From Publication to Media” assignment
The American Way of Eating1 lecture• Discussion: Review answers to in-class activity from last week
• In-class activity 15: Students will take 5 minutes write a short paragraph on what they think is the “typical” American diet to prepare for the discussion.
• Lecture: Discuss the “typical” American diet and the wide variety of factors influencing food choice, focusing on topics including obesity, eating disorders, food insecurity, orthorexia, and organic/locavores.
• Homework: Watch “Forks Over Knives” and take notes on information that is confusing or incorrect.
"Forks Over Knives" Movie Discussion1 lecture• Discussion: Students will have watched the movie before coming to class. We discuss key points in the movie, highlighting what the scientific literature says and why the messages might have been misconstrued. Students will turn in their notes as their in-class activity for the day.
• In-class activity 16: Students will turn in a list of 5 take-aways from the discussion
Food Politics and Research & Corporate Sponsorship1 lecture• Discussion: As a group we will discuss components of Marion Nestle’s “Food Politics” and highlight issues with research and politics.
• In-class activity 17: Students will turn in a list of 5 take-aways from the discussion
Social Ecological Model1 lecture• Introduce students to the social ecological model and have them build their own social ecological models and brainstorm policy ideas that relate to the social ecological model. This activity will help them understand the complexity of many of the topics researched in nutrition.
• In-class activity 18: Students will turn in the social ecological model that they create
Professionalism1 lecture• In-class activity 19: Students will take 5 minutes to jot down what they think professionalism involves.
• Lecture/Discussion: What does professionalism look like as a student and in their future careers? Talk about what they can do now to prepare for the workforce.
"From Publication to Media" Presentations - Day 11 lecture• Students assigned to this date will present their “From Publication to Media” presentations.
• In-class activity 20: Students will submit a question for each presenter.
"From Publication to Media" Presentations - Day 21 lecture• Students assigned to this date will present their “From Publication to Media” presentations.
• In-class activity 21: Students will submit a question for each presenter.
"From Publication to Media" Presentations - Day 31 lecture• Students assigned to this date will present their “From Publication to Media” presentations.
• In-class activity 22: Students will submit a question for each presenter.
"From Publication to Media" Presentations - Day 41 lecture• Students assigned to this date will present their “From Publication to Media” presentations.
• In-class activity 23: Students will submit a question for each presenter.
Current Hot Topics - Day 11 lecture• As a group we will talk about a hot topic in nutrition
• In-class activity 24: TBD
Current Hot Topics - Day 21 lecture• As a group we will talk about a hot topic in nutrition
• In-class activity 25: TBD
Current Hot Topics - Day 31 lecture• As a group we will talk about a hot topic in nutrition
• In-class activity 26: TBD
• Homework: Reflection Paper #3: What did I used to think and how have my views changed
Career Preparation1 lecture• Lecture/Discussion: What can you do now to prepare for your career? Allow students to ask questions about what they should do between now and graduation.
• In-class activity 27: Students will list 3 goals for themselves that they hope to accomplish before graduation.
NOTE: Throughout the semester we will watch short alumni profile videos, allowing students to explore different career options with a major in nutrition. This lecture will summarize that information.

sla (Mon, 18 Jan 2016 19:14:29 GMT): Looks good.
cdaubert (Tue, 19 Jan 2016 14:47:38 GMT): This course is part of the vision for the Nutrition Science program, and it has the support of the faculty.
Key: 8686