Date Submitted: Wed, 21 Mar 2018 19:17:09 GMT

Viewing: ENG 275 : Literature and War

Last approved: Tue, 07 Mar 2017 19:50:19 GMT

Last edit: Tue, 07 Mar 2017 19:50:14 GMT

Changes proposed by: mgfosque
Catalog Pages referencing this course
Change Type
Major
ENG (English)
275
032425
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
Literature and War
Literature and War
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
English (16ENG)
Term Offering
Fall and Spring
Offered Every Year
Fall 2016
Previously taught as Special Topics?
Yes
2
 
Course Prefix/NumberSemester/Term OfferedEnrollment
ENG 298/HUMG 295Fall 15 and Spring 1630 each semester
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3.0
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Meredith Fosque
Senior Lecturer

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture3030NoNA
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote
Prerequisite: ENG 101

Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
Yes
SIS Program CodeProgram TitleRequired or Elective?
16ENGBA-16LLTEnglish BA- LiteratureElective
16ENGLBA English BAElective
16ENGLBA-16ENGLCRWEnglish BA- Creative WritingElective
16ENGLBA-16ENGLFLMEnglish BA- FilmElective
16ENGLBA-16ENGLLWREnglish BA- Language, Writing, and RhetoricElective
16ENGLBA-16ENGLTEDEnglish BA-Teacher EducationElective
16ENGLBA-16ENGLMEnglish BA-MinorElective
A geographical and thematic examination of war and questions it raises, as reflected in selected writings from, Homer, Sophocles, Japan's Tale of the Heike, Shakespeare, The Bhagavad-Gita, Keegan, Kipling, Graham Green, Mulden, Michael Herr, Dexter Filkins, Lucius Shepherd as well as writers on Just War and Deterrence Theory, and military science.

Literature and War is an Interdisciplinary course bringing together perspectives that have not yet been explored in existing courses. Students will be asked to look through time, culture, and viewpoints at a subject they have probably not examined closely before. They will be required to both analyze and synthesize what they learn and do so verbally and in writing.


Literature and War will fulfill the GEP Categories: Humanities and Global Knowledge. (Course was already been approved as ENG 298 for Humanities and Global Knowledge in Fall '14)


No

Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Global Knowledge
Humanities
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
Measure(s) for above Outcome:

Students will interpret and evaluate the literature of war to find commonalities across the human experience in culture and time.
 
 
Critical Essays

Sample Question: Examine war as a culturally significant component of the twentieth-century by contrasting the oral histories and written stories constructed by Japan and Great Britain as they responded to events surrounding WWI and WWII.
 
 
Students will interpret the readings (and films) and examine the implications of those readings in relation to those of other students and scholars in the field.
 
 
Critical Essays

Sample Question: Accounting for the differences between the visual and the verbal (as well as prose and poetry), how do the Cold War era accounts, Lebow and Stein, Powers, and La Carre differ from each other?
 
 
Students will make scholarly arguments about the literature surrounding war by using critical frames in our field such as psychological studies, biographical studies, cultural studies, historical studies, and new criticism.
 
 
Critical Essays

Sample Question: Using US WWII recruiting advertisements, examine the history and art, as well as the psychological effects of such posters on citizens for creating consensus and approval for supporting the war both abroad and at home.
Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 
Students will examine and describe the practice of war in cultures other than the United States of America.
 
 
Critical Essays

Sample Question: Describe either the idea of “honor” espoused in the medieval Japanese Code of Bushido, the Western Medieval Code of Chivalry as seen in both the chapter "Knighthood in Action" and Shakespeare's Henry V, or, examine the particular cultural knowledge that shaped Vietnamese fighting strategies used during the Vietnam War.
 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 
Students will analyze and compare war from the literature of different cultures.
 
 
Critical Essays

Sample Question: How does Sunzi’s (Sun Tzu’s) concept of war differ from that of either Homer or Virgil? Support your claims with specific examples from the readings that we have discussed in class.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
100%
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
Not restricted
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
N/A
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
Sophomore standing or above
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
none
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 
See attached syllabus.
 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 

 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 

Course will be part of regular semester course load.

To explore how people speak of, reflect on, and tell stories about war in the context of history and the evolving technology of conflict. This course looks at writings about the experience of war both historically and thematically and does so from multiple perspectives: literary, historical and technological. Issues will include the nature and purpose of war, the role of weaponry in dictating battle, the question of a just war, the theory of deterrence, and an examination of the soldier. Texts include Sun Tzu, The Iliad, Tales of the Heike, Patrick O'Brien’s The Ionian Mission, American, British, Russian, and Japanese views of World Wars I and II, Spycraft, Holmstedt's Band of Sisters, and Shepherd’s R&R.


Student Learning Outcomes

Students will be able to:

1.interpret and evaluate the literature of war to find commonalities across the human experience in culture and time.

2. interpret the readings (and films) and examine the implications of those readings in relation to those of other students and scholars in the field.

3. make scholarly arguments about the literature surrounding war by using critical frames in our field such as psychological studies, biographical studies, cultural studies, historical studies, and new criticism.

4. analyze war from at least two disciplinary perspectives outside of literature, including military science and history.

5. generate cross-disciplinary examinations of various aspects of war.

6. make academic, evidence-based arguments about the critical issues surrounding war, Using literary and other sources.

7. examine and describe the practice of war in cultures other than the United States of America.

8. analyze and compare war from the literature of different cultures.


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Multiple exams40%Midterm and final ( 20% each)
Quizzes10%Two quizzes (5% each)
Major Paper40%Two papers, one from each half of the semester (20% each)
Written Assignment6%Six response assignments due after each unit is completed for 1 point each
presentation4%One presentation to the class audio and visual
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
Unit One: What is War? Early Writings on War3 weeksreading, lecture, discussion, class presentations
Unit Two: What are we fighting for? Feudal Warfare2 weeksreading, lecture, discussion, class presentations
Unit Three: Weapon technology, battle and outcomes: The Napoleonic and Colonial Eras2 weeksreading, lecture, discussion, class presentations
Unit Four: What is a just war? World Wars I and II3 weeksreading, lecture, discussion, class presentations
Unit Five: Cold and hot wars and the Theory of Deterrence: Vietnam and the Cold War2 weeksreading, lecture, discussion, class presentations
Unit Six: Who becomes a soldier? What is the Future of War?3 weeksreading, lecture, discussion, class presentations
This course, Literature and War, was approved for both Humanities and Global Knowledge in Fall 2014 under the numbers ENG 298/HUMG295.
Edited syllabus per David Austin's suggestions added 1/23/2017; JSD
IP dropped per college committee discussion and English DUP, 1/23/2017; JSD
despain (Thu, 08 Sep 2016 11:54:20 GMT): Rollback: Syllabus review; policies and links
aeherget (Fri, 10 Feb 2017 13:22:44 GMT): AECHH: Uploaded updated syllabus at instructor's request via email 2/9/2017.
Key: 9075