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Viewing: ENG 483 : Literature and Media

Last approved: Mon, 28 Nov 2016 19:37:41 GMT

Last edit: Mon, 28 Nov 2016 19:37:41 GMT

Catalog Pages referencing this course
Change Type
Major
ENG (English)
483
032397
Dual-Level Course
No
Cross-listed Course
No
Literature and Media
Lit. and Media
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
English (16ENG)
Term Offering
Fall and Spring
Offered Alternate Years
Fall 2017
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3
Course Attribute(s)
Capstone

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
James Mulholland
Associate Professor of English

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture1515NoN/A
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote
Restriction: Junior standing or above
Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
Yes
SIS Program CodeProgram TitleRequired or Elective?
16ENGBA-16LLTEnglish BA- LiteratureElective
16ENGLBAEnglish BAElective
16ENGLBA-16ENGLCRWEnglish BA- Creative WritingElective
16ENGLBA-16ENGLFLMEnglish BA- FilmElective
16ENGLBA-16ENGLLWREnglish BA- Language, Writing, and RhetoricElective
16ENGLBA-16ENGLTEDEnglish BA- Teacher Education Elective
16ENGLBA-16ENGLMEnglish BA- MinorElective
This course will explore how shifts in media technologies have influenced the creation, transmission, and reception of literature. Topics might include: investigations of how the spread of printing presses led to the first newspapers in eighteenth-century London, with comparison to how newspapers look today; study of the importance of serial publication in magazines for nineteenth-century authors like Charles Dickens; and examinations of spy novels, detective fiction, and the rise of the paperback in the twentieth century before turning to the explosion of graphic novels in the twenty-first century.

This course fulfills English department goals for a revised undergraduate literature curriculum. 


No

Is this a GEP Course?
No
GEP Categories

Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 

 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 

 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 

 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 

Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 

 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 

 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 

None.

During the semester, students will:


1. Interpret the relation of English literature and media over a span from the year 1600 to the present. Students will explore how literature capitalizes on changes and advances in media during this time period and how it experiments with creating new types of literature because of these changes in media technology. For example, students may examine the evolution of the genre of the English essay in concert with the wider dissemination of the printing press and the advent of the newspaper during the early eighteenth century.


2. Examine changes in media technology between 1600 and 1900, including, but not limited to, oral performance, handwriting, the printing press, the gramophone and phonograph, the telegraph, and the typewriter.


3. Consider how literary responses to changes in media affected notions of race, ethnicity, class, gender, and sexuality as well as regional, national, and transnational identities.


4. Become familiar with literature as an endeavor that always happens in a medium (or in multiple media) while understanding how media and media history supply students with new methods of literary interpretation. Students will gain experience with the critical traditions of media analysis of literary texts.


5. Learn to make critical arguments and defend intellectual assertions by appealing to the media form of literary texts and by analyzing those structural forms. 


Student Learning Outcomes

By the end of this course, students should be able to:


1. Identify major shifts in media technology and how those shifts affected the creation of literature in English.


2. Critically evaluate and interpret primary sources (literary texts) and secondary sources (essays and book chapters) as well as comprehend the historical and contemporary contexts of cultural texts.


3. Construct arguments that assert positions about major changes in media and literature between 1600 and 1900.


4. Explain how issues of race, ethnicity, class, gender, and sexuality contributed to innovations in media shifts and its impact on literature in English.


5. Explain how changes in media were connected with, and helped elaborate, forms of identity, including regional, national, and transnational identities.


6. Describe how individuals, groups, and institutions interacted with each other in different ways as a result how changes in media changed written literature.


7. Recognize that literature itself is an act of mediation and that all literature has a medium.


8. Illustrate how writers experimented with media in their writing by supplying examples from the texts examined during the class. 


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Participation10%Each student will be expected to participate in class, and it will result in 10% of the final grade.
Oral Presentation30%Each student will be involved in three different oral presentations to the whole class, each of which will be assessed at 10% of the final grade.
Essay30%Each student will be involved in composing three essays each of which is assessed at 10% of the final grade.
Project30Each student will provide a self-assessment and a group assessment for their working group that will account for 30% of their grade divided evenly among each type of assessment.
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
see syllabus
Instructional resource statement.
aeherget (Wed, 09 Nov 2016 19:02:04 GMT): AECHH: Uploading updated syllabus and updating restrictive statement at instructor's request via email. 11/8/2016
Key: 9077