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Viewing: MUS 210 : Introduction to Popular Music: 1950s-1970s

Last approved: Sat, 01 Apr 2017 08:02:24 GMT

Last edit: Sat, 01 Apr 2017 08:02:24 GMT

Catalog Pages referencing this course
Change Type
Major
MUS (Music)
210
016053
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
Introduction to Popular Music: 1950s-1970s
Popular Music 1950s-1970s
Division of Academic and Student Affairs
Music (24MUS)
Term Offering
Fall, Spring and Summer
Offered Upon Demand
Fall 2017
Previously taught as Special Topics?
Yes
1
 
Course Prefix/NumberSemester/Term OfferedEnrollment
MUS 295:005Fall 201530
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3.0
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Tom Koch
Teaching Assistant Professor

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture3030NoOne one section expected
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote

Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
No
This course examines the stylistic evolution and cultural impact of popular music in the United States from the 1950s through the 1970s. Musical styles discussed include American and British rock, R&B, country, folk, soul, funk, reggae, disco, and punk. No prior musical knowledge is necessary. Students may be required to provide their own transportation to and cover the cost of an on- or off-campus event. This course fulfills GEP requirements in Visual and Performing Arts.

An informal survey of students and faculty suggested that the original title (History of Rock) did not reflect the diversity of musical styles examined in the course and, as a result, might discourage enrollment by students who thought the course was limited to rock.  For maximum impact, the course description is also updated to identify the numerous styles covered in the course.  Finally, the syllabus and GEP statements now use the phrase "popular music" where the original had used "rock."  


Yes
Students may be required to provide their own transportation to and cover the cost of an on- or off-campus event. Fees for such events may vary, but should not exceed $30.
Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
US Diversity
Visual & Performing Arts
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
Students will explain specific aesthetic, cultural and historical contexts of popular music, such as (1) political and economic circumstances that influenced and, in turn, were influenced by musical production, (2) distinctions among African American and European American musical traditions, (3) roles of sexual, gender, and generational identity in the commercialization of popular music, and (4) the changing effects of technology and commercialism on the dissemination of popular music.
 
 
Students will take two tests. Sample essay question: Discuss the ways in which the album Sgt. Pepper’s broke new ground in the following areas: musical style, recording technology, instrumental timbre, cultural (and countercultural) reference, and the artistic inspiration of the concept album.
 
 
Through listening and discussion of selected songs, students will identify the variety of meanings a popular song may communicate based on an analysis of the musical elements, including melody, harmony, rhythm, timbre, texture, form, genre, and lyrics.
 
 
Students will write an essay that compares the music of their two favorite bands; part of the essay will involve examining songs with respect to musical style, subject matter, and contemporaneous historical, cultural, and political events in order to identify meanings, both explicit and implicit
 
 
Students will develop critical listening skills that enable them to distinguish the ways composers and performers organize musical elements to create a work that is coherent and unified
 
 
Students will engage in numerous listening activities (including listening to and discussing songs in class, listening tests, and written evaluation of a live concert) that require them to articulate the coherence and unity of a song’s structure based on the use and organization of musical elements.
Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 
Students will articulate the ways that popular music has impacted and then widened the generational gap between teens and adults in the United States beginning in the 1950s.
 
 
On tests, students will answer questions about the differences in social and political values between teens and adults engendered by the popular music industry, including values pertaining to socially acceptable behavior, marriage and family, the Civil Rights and anti-war movements, and the stylistic legitimacy of popular music.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 
Students will explain how changes in the perceptions of black racial authenticity during the 1960s coincided with the acceptance of and interaction with black artists by the mainstream popular (i.e., white) music establishment.
 
 
On tests, students will answer questions related to the causes of increasing white acceptance of and interaction with black artists and their music, such as the positive reception of lyrics concerning Civil Rights and the African-American experience, the influence of Motown, Atlantic, and Stax Records on the black and white radio and recording industries, and Billboard’s decision to merge the R&B and Pop charts in 1964.
Requisites and Scheduling
100
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
N/A
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
N/A
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
None
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
None
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 
Covach, John and Andrew Flory, What’s That Sound? An Introduction to Rock and Its History, 4th ed. (Norton, 2015). ISBN: 978-0393937251. $62.00 @ Amazon.
 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 
Please see attached syllabus
 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 
As part of the grading component, students will be required to attend a live popular music concert or club event and interview someone involved in the band or production team.
No new instructional resources required

Please see attached syllabus


Student Learning Outcomes

Students will explain specific aesthetic, cultural and historical contexts of popular music, such as (1) political and economic circumstances that influenced and, in turn, were influenced by musical production, (2) distinctions among African American and European American musical traditions, (3) roles of sexual, gender, and generational identity in the commercialization of popular music, and (4) the changing effects of technology and commercialism on the dissemination of popular music.


Through listening and discussion of selected songs, students will identify the variety of meanings a popular song may communicate based on an analysis of the musical elements, including melody, harmony, rhythm, timbre, texture, form, genre, and lyrics.


Students will develop critical listening skills that enable them to distinguish the ways composers and performers organize musical elements to create a work that is coherent and unified.


Students will articulate the ways that popular music has impacted and then widened the generational gap between teens and adults in the United States beginning in the 1950s.


Students will explain how changes in the perceptions of black racial authenticity during the 1960s coincided with the acceptance of and interaction with black artists by the mainstream popular (i.e., white) music establishment.


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Project35%35% Concert Attendance and Interview
Test2 listening tests each at 12.5%Two Listening tests totaling 25%
Short Paper20%20% Band Comparison Paper
QuizzesUp to 11 online textbook quizzes totaling 20%20% Online Textbook Quizzes
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
Please see Course Outline on attached syllabusVariesPlease see attached syllabus

aeherget (Wed, 15 Feb 2017 19:40:53 GMT): AECHH: Updating link to syllabus 2/15/2017.
Key: 9139