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Viewing: ENG 466 : Transatlantic Literatures

Last approved: Wed, 01 Feb 2017 09:01:49 GMT

Last edit: Wed, 01 Feb 2017 09:01:49 GMT

Catalog Pages referencing this course
Change Type
Major
ENG (English)
466
032414
Dual-Level Course
No
Cross-listed Course
No
Transatlantic Literatures
Transatlantic Literatures
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
English (16ENG)
Term Offering
Fall and Spring
Offered Alternate Years
Fall 2017
Previously taught as Special Topics?
No
 
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded with S/U option
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3
Course Attribute(s)
GEP (Gen Ed)

If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Jon Thompson
Professor

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture3535Non/a
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote
Requisite: Sophomore Standing or Above
Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
Yes
SIS Program CodeProgram TitleRequired or Elective?
16ENGBA-16LLTEnglish BA-LiteratureElective
16ENGLBA English BAElective
16ENGLBA-16ENGLCRWEnglish BA-Creative WritingElective
16ENGLBA-16ENGLFLMEnglish BA-FilmElective
16ENGLBA-16ENGLLWREnglish BA-Language, Writing, and RhetoricElective
16ENGLBA-16ENGLTEDEnglish BA-Teacher EducationElective
16ENGLBA-16ENGLMEnglish BA-MinorElective
This course will investigate notable literary exchanges in the literatures of the Atlantic Rim, long linked by trade (including slavery) as well as by commerce of many other kinds. Examples of these exchanges include Great Britain and the U.S., the U.S. and the Caribbean, and very importantly, between African cultures on the Atlantic and Atlantic cultures in the U.S. The course will explore the literary and cultural hybridity brought about by these exchanges. Representative writers: William Shakespeare and Aimee Cesaire, Joseph Conrad and Chinua Achebe; Charlotte Bronte and Jean Rhys; William Faulkner and Edouard Glissant.

Part of the new Literature Program concentration.


No

Is this a GEP Course?
Yes
GEP Categories
Humanities
US Diversity
Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 
Students will:

1. Interpret a variety of genres from critical perspectives that illuminate the trans-Atlantic literary exchanges between the Old World of Europe and the New World of the Americas, the Caribbean, and Africa.
2. Analyze the relationship between form, content, and meaning.
 
 
Critical essays.
Sample question: William Shakespeare's THE TEMPEST has come to be regarded as a profound meditation upon mastery and subjection, indeed on the the colonial dynamics of power that transformed the New World. As such, the play is an example of the power of literature to evaluate cultural difference, as well as the politics of cultural difference. Discuss Shakespeare's treatment of power. Who has power and why? Where does power come from? How does Shakespeare evaluate these power relationships? How does the play analyze relations of mastery and subjection? How does it treat the New World and the Old? What key images in the play embody Shakespeare's thinking?
 
 
Students will analyze, evaluate and/or synthesize different interpretations of literary texts. They will then use these literary texts to demonstrate the different interpretations that can be made of the formal elements in the literature by contextualizing them in different cultural/critical frameworks.
 
 
Critical essays
Sample essay prompt: In a very influential essay, "An Image of Africa: Racism in Conrad's HEART OF DARKNESS" the Nigerian novelist and critic, Chinua Achebe condemns Conrad for being a "thoroughgoing racist" for, among other things, representing Africans as less than human and Africa as "the other world." Achebe's essay launched a lively debate on HEART OF DARKNESS and racism. Discuss HEART OF DARKNESS and racism. Is it a racist novel? To what extent do you agree with Achebe's arguments? Others have argued that the novel is deeply sympathetic to the plight of Africans who suffered under colonialism and that the novel is a bracing condemnation of the entire system of colonialism itself and so it cannot simply be read as racist. Argue for or against Achebe's view, realizing that it is also possible to see the novel as adopting contradictory positions.
 
 
Conduct critical research on the human experience as represented in literary texts using analysis and evidence appropriate to critical writing in the humanities.
 
 
Critical essays.

Sample prompt: Like Shakespeare, Jean Rhys is interested in bondage and freedom--and the human systems, institutions and values that serve, or might serve, both. WIDE SARGASSO SEA is often not only read as a novel that explores patriarchal power as it plays out in the Rochester/ Bertha relationship but in the colonial relations of master and subject that each of them occupy. Discuss Rhys's feminist view of colonial power. For her, where does colonial power come from? Who does it benefit? How do women fit into the context of colonial power? What hope does the novel have for a transformation of these colonial relations?
Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 
Articulate the ways in which cultural and societal influences shape gender, racial, ethnic, and/or class identities as reflected in literature.
 
 
Critical Essay
Sample prompt: In Shakespeare's THE TEMPEST, Caliban, native son of the New World, is represented largely as monstrous and wild. The play undertakes an examination of power that brings in considerations of race. Compare and contrast Shakespeare's treatment of Caliban as a racialized Other with American author Aimee Cesaire's version of Caliban in A TEMPEST, which is an American rewriting of Shakespeare's play. How does Cesaire's play represent the relationship between master and slave? How does each see freedom? How does each represent race? Discuss.
 
 
Conduct comparative critical research on the historical, social, political and/or economic processes producing diversity, equality and structured inequalities in the U.S.
 
 
Critical essays.

Sample essay topic: Faulkner's novel, LIGHT IN AUGUST, traces the arc of Joe Christmas's life, a life damaged by racism and lack of due process before the law. How does Faulkner represent the law in the novel? How is it affected by economic and racial factors? Compare and contrast Faulkner's representation of the law with Richard Wright's novel, NATIVE SON. How does Wright represent the law? To what extent does NATIVE SON see the law as influenced by class and race? To what extent for each can the law deliver justice? Discuss with reference in your argument to at least three relevant critical sources.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
70%
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 
30% for English Majors
 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 
No
 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 
Sophomore standing
 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 
None
Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 
See attached syllabus.
 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 
See attached syllabus.
 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 

No new resources needed.

1. Interpret a variety of genres from critical perspectives that illuminate the trans-Atlantic literary exchanges between the Old World of Europe and the New World of the Americas, the Caribbean, and Africa.

2. Analyze the relationship between form, content, and meaning.

3. Conduct critical research that casts light on the literary/cultural dimensions of the literary exchanges in the Atlantic Rim Basin.

4. Create well-constructed arguments.

5. Demonstrate their proficiency as critical writers in terms of critical development and stylistic clarity.


Student Learning Outcomes

Students will be able to:

1. Identify major cultural dialogues in trans-Atlantic literature issues of power, race, and sexuality.

2. Identify key historical and cultural moments to which transatlantic literature is responding.

3. Identify the role diversity plays in trans-Atlantic literature and its transformative effects on literature.

4. Critically evaluate primary sources (literary texts) and secondary sources (essays and book chapters).

5.  Identify the effects of the hybrid nature of reciprocal influences among trans-Atlantic writers.

6. Develop critical thinking skills and critical writing skills.


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Essay40%Two thesis-driven critical essays, each 20%.
Midterm20%Emphasis on critical analysis and critical writing.
Final Exam20%Emphasis on critical analysis and critical writing.
Quiz10%Daily quizzes on the reading.
Participation10%See syllabus for full explanation.

Key: 9320