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Viewing: CH 749 : Analytical Spectroscopy

Last approved: Tue, 30 Aug 2016 14:55:13 GMT

Last edit: Tue, 30 Aug 2016 14:09:34 GMT

Change Type
Major
CH (Chemistry)
749
032364
Dual-Level Course
Cross-listed Course
No
Analytical Spectroscopy
Analytical Spectroscopy
College of Sciences
Chemistry (17CH)
Term Offering
Fall Only
Offered Every Year
Fall 2016
Previously taught as Special Topics?
Yes
3
 
Course Prefix/NumberSemester/Term OfferedEnrollment
CH7952012 Spring6
CH7952014 Fall9
CH7952015 Fall3
Course Delivery
Face-to-Face (On Campus)

Grading Method
Graded/Audit
3
16
Contact Hours
(Per Week)
Component TypeContact Hours
Lecture3
Course Attribute(s)


If your course includes any of the following competencies, check all that apply.
University Competencies

Course Is Repeatable for Credit
No
 
 
Gufeng Wang
Assistant Professor
Full

Open when course_delivery = campus OR course_delivery = blended OR course_delivery = flip
Enrollment ComponentPer SemesterPer SectionMultiple Sections?Comments
Lecture99NoN/A
Open when course_delivery = distance OR course_delivery = online OR course_delivery = remote
Prerequisite: CH 315 and CH 316 or equivalent
Is the course required or an elective for a Curriculum?
No
This is a graduate level course for analytical spectroscopy and instrumentation. The course covers the fundamentals of light-matter interaction, concepts and methodology of selected spectroscopic methods, components and working principles of optical instruments, and factors that affect the quality of optical measurements.

Analytical Spectroscopy is one of the main areas in chemical measurements and chemical analysis. Modern optical spectroscopic instruments can be found nearly in every research lab in both academia and industry. In most of the other major research universities, Analytical Spectroscopy (or Spectrochemical Analysis) is listed as one of the “core” courses for Analytical Chemistry programs. For most of the graduate students, this is the only course that prepares them with the advanced knowledge about instrumentation and working principles of spectroscopic methods, as well as factors that affect the quality of optical measurements.


This course fills a void in the graduate programs offered by NC-State University. It introduces the students to modern analytical methods and chemical analysis using optical spectroscopic methods. It covers the fundamentals and the state-of-art optical spectroscopic techniques that are useful for chemical, biological and material sciences. A course offered at the graduate level will help the Chemistry students understand the fundamentals of the most used instruments and establish connections between chemicals and real-world optical measurements. In addition, I expect that students from Physics, Biomedical Engineering, Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering, Biochemistry, Biological Sciences, Material Science and Engineering, as well as the Chemistry undergraduate program would be interested in this course.


No

Is this a GEP Course?
GEP Categories

Humanities Open when gep_category = HUM
Each course in the Humanities category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Mathematical Sciences Open when gep_category = MATH
Each course in the Mathematial Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Natural Sciences Open when gep_category = NATSCI
Each course in the Natural Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Social Sciences Open when gep_category = SOCSCI
Each course in the Social Sciences category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interdisciplinary Perspectives Open when gep_category = INTERDISC
Each course in the Interdisciplinary Perspectives category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Visual & Performing Arts Open when gep_category = VPA
Each course in the Visual and Performing Arts category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Health and Exercise Studies Open when gep_category = HES
Each course in the Health and Exercise Studies category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to:
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
&
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Global Knowledge Open when gep_category = GLOBAL
Each course in the Global Knowledge category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve objective #1 plus at least one of objectives 2, 3, and 4:
 
 

 
 

 
Please complete at least 1 of the following student objectives.
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

US Diversity Open when gep_category = USDIV
Each course in the US Diversity category of the General Education Program will provide instruction and guidance that help students to achieve at least 2 of the following objectives:
Please complete at least 2 of the following student objectives.
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Requisites and Scheduling
 
a. If seats are restricted, describe the restrictions being applied.
 

 
b. Is this restriction listed in the course catalog description for the course?
 

 
List all course pre-requisites, co-requisites, and restrictive statements (ex: Jr standing; Chemistry majors only). If none, state none.
 

 
List any discipline specific background or skills that a student is expected to have prior to taking this course. If none, state none. (ex: ability to analyze historical text; prepare a lesson plan)
 

Additional Information
Complete the following 3 questions or attach a syllabus that includes this information. If a 400-level or dual level course, a syllabus is required.
 
Title and author of any required text or publications.
 

 
Major topics to be covered and required readings including laboratory and studio topics.
 

 
List any required field trips, out of class activities, and/or guest speakers.
 

College(s)Contact NameStatement Summary
College of Agriculture and Life SciencesMike Goshe (BCH)I looked over both course action forms and they are fine. The BIO/CH 727 cross-listing and title upgrade are appropriate, and CH 749 is an appropriate addition to the Chemistry graduate program. These courses do not conflict with anything we currently offer
College of EngineeringSaad Khan (CHE)We are good here
This course has previously been taught as a Special Topics course and is part of a faculty member’s regular teaching load. There is no lab associated with this course. No new resources are required.

The goal of this course is for students to gain an in-depth understanding of the principles of spectrochemical analysis. The course will prepare the graduate student by providing an understanding of the fundamental processes behind molecular methods of spectroscopic analysis and the design of spectroscopic instrumentation. The course will cover the principles of light-matter interaction, the methodology of selected spectroscopic methods, instrumentation of these spectroscopic methods, and factors that affect the quality of optical measurements. A student will leave this class with the ability to understand spectrometric concepts in the literature and apply spectroscopic analysis method in their own research.


Student Learning Outcomes

The goal of this course is for students to gain an understanding of the principles of spectrochemical analysis. The course will prepare the graduate students by providing an understanding of the fundamental processes behind molecular methods of spectroscopic analysis and the design of spectroscopic instrumentation.


After learning the course, the students should be able to:


1. Describe the scientific principles underlying optical measurements


2. Describe the operation of the instrument components required to make spectroscopic measurements


3. Evaluate results of measurements in terms of signals and noises/interferences


4. Critique (orally and in writing) scientific literature that describes measurements utilizing the elements covered in the course


5. Design and evaluate spectroscopic methods for specific chemical problems


Evaluation MethodWeighting/Points for EachDetails
Multiple exams50%There will be two exams in the course. The first one will be closed-book (20%). The second one will be open book (30%).
Homework30%Three problem sets will be given during the semester. The problem sets will be based on either the lecture material or assigned research articles from the literature.
Major Paper10%Term paper and Presentation: Each student will pick one topic that is relevant to using optical measurement to acquire chemical information, write a 3-page review paper on the topic, and give a fifteen-minute presentation to the class at the end of the semester. Please talk to the instructor before you finalize your topic to make sure no overlaps between student presentations. The grading will be based on the assessment of students’ written and oral communication of scientific data.
Oral Presentation10%Term paper and Presentation: Each student will pick one topic that is relevant to using optical measurement to acquire chemical information, write a 3-page review paper on the topic, and give a fifteen-minute presentation to the class at the end of the semester. Please talk to the instructor before you finalize your topic to make sure no overlaps between student presentations. The grading will be based on the assessment of students’ written and oral communication of scientific data.
TopicTime Devoted to Each TopicActivity
Course introduction1 lectureCourse introduction; history of spectrochemical analysis
Light-matter interactions 2 lecturesRadiation; optical intensity; types of light-matter interactions;

Spectrochemical measurements and analytical information
Spectrometers and geometric optics2 lecturesFrequently used optics in spectrometers – an understanding using geometric optics rules: light propagation; imaging rules, etc.

Design and optical path in spectrometers; numerical aperture and photon collection efficiency; aberrations and their impact on measurements
Spectrometers and wave optics3 lecturesWave optics - Wave properties of light; diffraction and interference; Huygens-Fresnel principle; math behind diffraction and interference

Light dispersion - Math behind diffraction and interference (continued); single slit, double slit, and multi-slit diffraction; gratings and grating equations

Light dispersion device - Monochromators, spectrographs, and spectral resolution
Polarization1 lecturePolarization of light - Chemical information behind polarization; methods to generate polarized light
Other optics1 lectureOther optics - Color selection; intensity modulation techniques; fiber optics etc.
Light sources 2 lecturesLight sources - Blackbody radiation; gas discharge lamps; other lamps

Light sources – Lasers and stimulated emission; semiconductor-based light sources (LEDs and semiconductor lasers)
Detectors2 lecturesOptical transducers - General properties; thermal detectors; photon detectors; photomultiplier tubes(PMT); analog mode and single photon counting mode

Optical transducers - Photodiodes; array detectors, CCD and CMOS detectors
Signal and noises2 lecturesSignal-to-noise ratio - Sensitivity and LOD; characterization of noises; noise classification; interference; thermal noise; bandwidth

Signal-to-noise ratio - Shot noise and Poisson distribution; 1/f noise; methods to combat noises (software and hardware)
Atomic spectroscopy2 lecturesAtomic spectroscopy - Spectral line width broadening; peak profiles under different broadening conditions (Gaussian and Lorentzian); characteristics of different peak profiles; practical peak profiles (Voigt)

Atomic spectroscopy - Methods and instrument components
Molecular spectroscopy5 lecturesMolecular spectroscopy - Types of molecular spectroscopy; Born-Oppenheimer approximation; Franck-Condon principle; chemical information

Molecular luminescence - Introduction; Jablonski diagram; time scales of molecular processes; fluorescence lifetime and rate constant measurements

Molecular luminescence - Excited states and excited state processes; quenching; energy transfer; anisotropy; excited reactions

UV-VIS - Instrumentation; signal/noise expression; deviation from Beer's law

IR - Instrumentation; non-dispersive instruments; IR detectors
Scattering1 lectureScattering - molecular Raman scattering; scattering from metal nanoparticles; Localized surface plasmon resonances; SERS
Optical microscopy1 lectureOptical imaging and spectroscopy – Microscopes; spatial resolution; frequently used microscopy (bright field, dark field, phase contrast, epi- and confocal fluorescence, etc.)
Outlook1 lectureState-of-the-art techniques - Single molecule spectroscopy and imaging; super resolution techniques; outlook of future techniques
Exams and student presentations3 lecturesExam 1: mid-way through semester. Student presentations: last two class meetings
mlnosbis 8/4/2016: See consultation notes above. No further consultation required.

ghodge 8/9/2016 Ready for ABGS reviewers

ABGS Reviewer Comments:
-It has very low enrollments and from the projects, it will cap at 9?
-No price is on the textbook in the syllabus
-Syllabus mentions lab visits as well, will these visits be on campus? if not, a note is needed for travel off campus.

ghodge 8/16/2016 there is no set number for enrollment. Would ask that department add textbook pricing to the syllabus when the course is taught and add a note to syllabus when field trips are required.
allloyd (Thu, 04 Aug 2016 14:26:41 GMT): Approved by college committee
Key: 9536