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Department of Plant and Microbial Biology

http://catalog.ncsu.edu/undergraduate/collegeofals/plantbiology/

...in the junior year, following completion of BIO 183 and Organic Chemistry ( CH 223 ) with...

PO 322 Muscle Foods and Eggs 3. Prerequisite: ZO 160, BIO 181 or BIO 183.

Processing and preserving fresh poultry, red meats, seafood, and eggs. Ante- and post-mortem events as they affect quality, yield, and compositional characteristics of muscle foods. Principles and procedures involved in the production of processedmeat items.

ANS 324 Milk and Dairy Products 3. Prerequisite: BIO 181 or 183, CH 101.

Introduction to the manufacture of dairy products. Dairy processing procedures from the farm, through the dairy plant, and to the consumer are studied. The course consists of 15 learning modules, three exams, and a project.

FS 324 Milk and Dairy Products 3. Prerequisite: BIO 181 or 183, CH 101.

Introduction to the manufacture of dairy products. Dairy processing procedures from the farm, through the dairy plant, and to the consumer are studied. The course consists of 15 learning modules, three exams, and a project.

ANS 322 Muscle Foods and Eggs 3. Prerequisite: ZO 160, BIO 181 or BIO 183.

Processing and preserving fresh poultry, red meats, seafood, and eggs. Ante- and post-mortem events as they affect quality, yield, and compositional characteristics of muscle foods. Principles and procedures involved in the production of processedmeat items.

FS 322 Muscle Foods and Eggs 3. Prerequisite: ZO 160, BIO 181 or BIO 183.

Processing and preserving fresh poultry, red meats, seafood, and eggs. Ante- and post-mortem events as they affect quality, yield, and compositional characteristics of muscle foods. Principles and procedures involved in the production of processedmeat items.

CS 211 Plant Genetics 3. Prerequisite: BIO 183 or ZO 160.

Fundaments of plant genetics. Genetic basis for plant improvement. Genetic analysis of Mendelian traits, molecular structure and organization of genetic material, crop biotechnology, distribution and behavior of genes in populations.

BME 467 Mechanics of Tissues & Implants Requirements 3. Prerequisite: (ZO 160 or BIO 183) and (MAE 314 or CE 313).

Application of engineering and biological principles to understand the structure and performance of tendons, ligaments, skin, and bone; bone mechanics; viscoelasticity of soft biological tissues; models of soft biological tissues; mechanics of skeletal muscle; and tissue-derived devices as well as interfaces between native tissues and synthetic devices.

TE 467 Mechanics of Tissues & Implants Requirements 3. Prerequisite: (ZO 160 or BIO 183) and (MAE 314 or CE 313).

Application of engineering and biological principles to understand the structure and performance of tendons, ligaments, skin, and bone; bone mechanics; viscoelasticity of soft biological tissues; models of soft biological tissues; mechanics of skeletal muscle; and tissue-derived devices as well as interfaces between native tissues and synthetic devices.

AEE 208 Agricultural Biotechnology: Issues and Implications 3. Prerequisite: (BIO 105 or BIO 115 or BIO 181 or BIO 183).

Trends and issues of agricultural biotechnology in today's society are addressed while covering the basic biological science behind the technology. Applications of and policy issues associated with plant, animal, and environmental biotechnology used in the agricultural industry are examined from an interdisciplinary approach.

BME 301 Human Physiology for Engineers I 3. Prerequisite: BME 201 and either ZO 160 or BIO 183, BME Majors, Corequisite: BME 311.

This course includes a quantitative approach to human physiology from the biomedical engineering perspective with an emphasis on neural, sensory, muscle, and cardiac physiology. Autonomic neural and somatic motor control will be discussed. Engineering applications, including neural stimulators, functional imaging, cochlear implants, artificial noses, vestibular implants, visual implants, artificial larynges, pacemakers and defibrillators will be discussed. Assignments include computer-based exercises using MATLAB.

SSC 427 Biological Approaches to Sustainable Soil Systems 3. Prerequisite: SSC 200 or equivalent, BIO 181 or 183, and CH 101.

Ecological and biochemical concepts will be applied to managing soils in agro-ecological settings such as organic and conventionally managed farms and gardens, emphasizing microbial transformations of nutrients and matter. Topics covered include soil organic matter formation and fractionation, decomposition, microbial assimilation of nutrients, fertilizer management, tillage, crop rotations, cover crop management. Companion course SSC 428 and SSC 341 recommended.

MT 432 Biotextiles Evaluation 3. Prerequisite: MT 323 and BIO 183; Corequisite: MT 366 or TE 466..

Evaluation of the performance of biotextiles and medical polymers in biological and microbiological environments, with an emphasis on in vitro and in vivo techniques for testing the biocompatibility and biostability of implantable biomedical products. Related issues will deal with quality assurance systems, inspection and sampling plans, ISO certification, good manufacturing practices, reference materials and organisms, and the use of accelerated tests and animal trials so as to meet regulatory requirements.

ANS 205 Physiology of Domestic Animals 3. Prerequisite: (BIO 181 or BIO 183) and Sophomore standing.

This course is designed to introduce students to mammalian physiology (structure and function) with emphasis on livestock species. Students will gain a basic understanding of body systems including circulatory, muscular, skeletal, digestive, and reproductive systems and functions of those systems with relevance to the whole animal and maintenance of homeostasis.

BAE 315 Properties of Biological Engineering Materials 3. Prerequisite: (BIO 181 or BIO 183), and either (BAE 200, CSC 112, CSC 114 or CSC 116) and (CE 215 or MAE 208) and Corequisites: (MAE 308 or CE 382), and (MAE 314 or CE 313)..

Physical properties of biological and non-biological engineering materials, their uniqueness and variability within systems. Relationships between plant, animal, and human tissues, property measurement, and evaluation of dimensional, mechanical, rheological, thermal, electrical, and optical properties.

ANS 230 Animal Nutrition 3. Prerequisite: ANS 150 or BIO 183; ANS 205 is also recommended..

Introduction to nutrition, digestion, and absorption in domestic mammals. Major nutrient classes and their functions in the body, feed classification and chemical analysis, feed processing, and nutrient requirements.

SSC 428 Service-Learning in Urban Agriculture Systems 1. Prerequisite: SSC 200 or equivalent, BIO 181 or 183, and CH 101.

Course provides students a hands-on experience in urban agriculture with under-served youth in the Raleigh area. Students partner with a community gardening organization to provide knowledge and experience in soil science and agriculture to youth with the goals of increasing urban food security and developing student leadership skills. Particular emphasis is places on reflecting on course activities and deepening of skills related to extension, outreach, and working with diverse populations. Course designed to be taken as a companion course to SSC 427, however can be taken as a stand-alone course.

BME 540 Nanobiotechnology Processing, Characterization, and Applications 3. Prerequisite: BIO 183 and PY 212.

Topics at the interface of nanoscale science and biotechnology will be discussed. Chemical, physical, and biological properties of nanostructured biomaterials, devices, and systems. Lectures and problem-based learning will be used to present development of nanobiotechnology-enhanced materials and devices.

GN 311 Principles of Genetics 4. Prerequisite: BIO 183 or ZO 160.

Basic concepts and principles of prokaryotic and eukaryotic genetics. Mendelian inheritance, polygenic inheritance, linkage and mapping, chromosome aberrations, population genetics, evolution, DNA structure and replication, gene expression, mutation, gene regulation, extranuclear inheritance, bacterial and viral genetics, and recombinant DNA technology.

HS 428 Service-Learning in Urban Agriculture Systems 1. Prerequisite: SSC 200 or equivalent, BIO 181 or 183, and CH 101.

Course provides students a hands-on experience in urban agriculture with under-served youth in the Raleigh area. Students partner with a community gardening organization to provide knowledge and experience in soil science and agriculture to youth with the goals of increasing urban food security and developing student leadership skills. Particular emphasis is places on reflecting on course activities and deepening of skills related to extension, outreach, and working with diverse populations. Course designed to be taken as a companion course to SSC 427, however can be taken as a stand-alone course.

BIO 183 Introductory Biology: Cellular and Molecular Biology 4. Prerequisite: BIO 181 or CH 101.

Basic concepts and principles of molecular, cellular, and developmental biology. Emphasis will be on the physical basis of life, the cell as the fundamental unit of life, the mechanisms involved in the development of multicellular organisms and on critical thinking, problem solving, experimental design, and effective communication. Cannot receive credit for both BIO 183 and (BIO 105 or BIO 106 or BIO 115 or BIO 116).

BIO 212 Basic Human Anatomy and Physiology 4. Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 183.

Major emphasis on structure and function of the muscular, skeletal, circulatory and nervous systems of humans. Credit in both BIO 212 and BIO 301 or BIO 302 is not allowed.

BIO 315 General Parasitology 3. Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 181 and BIO 183.

General principles of parasitic symbiosis. Emphasis on life cycles, epidemiology, and pathology of major parasites of humans and domestic animals.

BIO 405 Functional Histology 3. Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 183.

Offered only as a distance education course via the internet. Functional Histology describes the cellular structure of tissues and organs. Human organs are emphasized, with brief consideration given to variation in other mammals. Tissue and organ structure is related to function, including examples of malfunction (histopathology). The course is especially appropriate for students planning a career in veterinary science, medicine, or allied health fields. Offered by distance education only.

BIO 269 Research in the Life Sciences II: Guided Research 3. Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 183 and B- or better in BIO 267.

This course is designed to provide students with a laboratory framework for conducting original research and (together with BIO 267) preparation to move on to conducting research in a scientific laboratory. Students will explore the binding characteristics of bacterially-expressed estrogen receptor genes by generating their own research goals, writing research proposals, conducting original independent research, and presenting their findings in at least one poster symposium. This course is the second part of the Research PackTrack program, and students in this course will have earned a B- or better in the first course (BIO 267). Individualized/Independent Study and Research courses require a Course Agreement for Students Enrolled in Non-Standard Courses be completed by the student and faculty member prior to registration by the department.

BIO 267 Research in the Life Sciences I: Research Skills 3. Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 181 and Corequisite: BIO 183.

This course is designed to help first year students learn basic skills associated with scientific research. Class structure is interactive and relies on group collaboration for most projects. Students will become confident in reading and analyzing scientific literature, communicating scientific principles, compiling a poster presentation, presenting at scientific conferences, and attending local scientific symposia as well as practicing some basic laboratory techniques. The 2-semester Research PackTrack Program (BIO 267 and 269) is designed to prepare undergraduates for an original research experience in a scientific laboratory. A B- or better in BIO 267 is required to take BIO 269. Students in BIO 267 are required to attending one research symposium outside of regular class time. Individualized/Independent Study and Research courses require a Course Agreement for Students Enrolled in Non-Standard Courses be completed by the student and faculty member prior to registration by the department.

MB 351 General Microbiology 3. Prerequisite: One Biology course (BIO 181, BIO 183, ZO 150 or ZO 160) and one Organic Chemistry course (CH 221 or CH 220).

Rigorous introduction to basic principles of microbiology for students in biological and agricultural sciences and for all students planning to take further courses in microbiology.

HS 302 Gardening with Herbaceous Perennials 3. Prerequisite: BIO 183 or BO 200.

Examination of the use of herbaceous perennials in the home garden and commercial landscapes. Topics include: general plant characteristics, culture and management, garden attributes, design usage, horticultural history, propagation, use of exotic (nonnative)species in the garden, heirloom roses and ornamental grasses.

NTR 500 Principles of Human Nutrition 3. Prerequisite: CH 220 and (CH 221 or CH 223) and (ZO 160 or BIO 181/183).

Overview of fields of Nutritional Sciences; functions of nutrients in the human body; sources and properties of nutrients; relationships of food industry practices to nutrition. Credit will not be given for both NTR (FS)400 and NTR 500.

BIT 410 Manipulation of Recombinant DNA 4. Prerequisite: BIO 183 or ZO/BIO 160 and CH 223 or CH 227 with a C- or better.

Introduction to molecular biology and protein chemistry. Theory behind laboratory techniques and overview of cloning strategies starting from nucleic acid or protein sequence data. Laboratory sessions involve subcloning, preparation of competent cells, transformation, screening recombinant DNA by colony hybridization and PCR, SDS-PAGE of recombinant protein, affinity purification, and western blots.

PB 321 Introduction to Whole Plant Physiology 3. Prerequisite: (BIO 183 or PB 200 or PB 250) and CH 101/102.

Physiology of higher plants with emphasis on whole plant aspects including structure-function relationships, water and solute movement, energy sources and needs, plant growth and development, and the impact of plant physiology findings on agriculture. Students cannot receive credit for both PB 321 and PB 421.

PB 277 Space Biology 3. Prerequisite: BIO 105 or BIO 140 or BIO 181 or BIO 183 or PB 200.

Overview of the biology of plants, animals and humans in the space environment, including gravitational biology, aerospace medicine, search for extraterrestrial life, terraforming and life support.

PB 403 Systematic Botany 4. Prerequisite: PB 200, PB 250, BIO 183, Junior standing.

The course introduces basic and contemporary systematic principles and methods as applied to vascular plants, with emphasis on flowering plants. It covers classification, identification, phylogenetics, and molecular approaches, and surveys important and common plant families representing major groups of vascular plants.

PB 503 Systematic Botany 4. Prerequisite: PB 200, PB 250, BIO 183, Junior standing.

The course introduces basic and contemporary systematic principles and methods as applied to vascular plants, with emphasis on flowering plants. It covers classification, identification, phylogenetics, and molecular approaches, and surveys important and common plant families representing major groups of vascular plants.

BAE 321 Bioprocessing Engineering Fundamentals 3. Prerequisite: BIO 181 or BIO 183; Corequisite: MAE 201.

For Engineering and non-Engineering students interested in processing, biotechnology and related disciplines, it is important to have an understanding of the basic principles behind process analysis, design and scale up. This course will provide an introduction to the interdisciplinary approach and engineering concepts behind the development of useful food, chemical, energy, nutraceutical and pharmaceutical products through transformation of biological materials (bioprocessing). Some of the relevant topics covered include the fundamentals behind units, dimensions and engineering properties, stoichiometry, data analysis and statistics, mass and energy balances, rheology, mixing, heat and mass transfer, reaction kinetics and unit operations.

BIO 414 Cell Biology 3. Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 183 and (CH 221 or CH 225).

The chemical and physical bases of cellular structure and function with emphasis on methods and interpretations.

PB 414 Cell Biology 3. Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 183 and (CH 221 or CH 225).

The chemical and physical bases of cellular structure and function with emphasis on methods and interpretations.

ZO 317 Primate Ecology and Evolution 3. Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 181 & BIO 183, and one of the following courses: ANT 251, BIO 212, BIO 250, BIO/PB 330, BIO 350, BIO/PB 360, BIO 410 , BIO 422, BIO 424, or BIO 488.

A comprehensive survey of the behavior, evolution, and ecology of nonhuman primates. Special emphasis will be placed in the evolution of cognitive abilities, social systems, and behavioral patterns that are unique to primates, including the evolution of language. Topics include primate taxonomy, evolution of the extant primates, geographic distribution, social behavior, reproductive behavior and strategies, parental behavior, communication, and cognitive. Classes will consist of interactive lectures, films, and class discussions.

ZO 250 Animal Anatomy and Physiology 4. Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 183.

Roles of physical laws, environmental challenges, and evolutionary history in shaping animal structure and function. Selected examples from invertebrates and vertebrates. Laboratory in anatomy and physiology, hypothesis generation and testing and data analysis and presentation.

MSE 485 Biomaterials 3. Prerequisite: BME 203 and BIO 183.

Introduction to materials of natural and synthetic origin and brief survey of historic, current, and future applications of materials in medicine. Examination of the classes and properties of degradable and non-degradable materials, interactions of materials with cells and tissues, and fundamentals of biocompatibility including inflammation, encapsulation, and infection. Discussion of biomaterial failure mechanisms, regulation, and related ethical concerns.

BME 441 Biomechanics 3. Prerequisite: ZO 160 or BIO 183; BME 342; ST 370.

Students study human body kinematics, force analysis of joints, and the structure and composition of biological materials. Emphasis is placed on the measurement of mechanical properties and the development and understanding of models of biological material mechanical behavior.

BME 541 Biomechanics 3. Prerequisite: ZO 160 or BIO 183, BME 342, ST 370.

Students study human body kinematics, force analysis of joints, and the structure and composition of biological materials. Emphasis is placed on the measurement of mechanical properties and the development and understanding of models of biological material mechanical behavior.

AEC 501 Ornithology 4. Prerequisite: BIO 181, BIO 183, and (BIO 250 or BIO/PB 360).

The biology of birds. Lecture topics include evolution, functional morphology, physiology, ecology and behavior. Field and museum laboratories emphasize particular aspects of morphology, ecology and behavior, as well as taxonomy and identification.One coastal weekend field trip required.

CBS 770 Cell Biology 3. Prerequisite: BCH 451 and BIO 183 and (CH 223 or CH 227).

Advanced cell and organelle structure and function and recent advances in molecular biology. Emphasis on current literature and application of research procedures.

FOR 430 Forest Health and Protection 3. Prerequisite: PB 200 or BIO 181 or BIO 183 or FOR 260 or BIO 360 or PB 360 (or other Biology or Plant Biology course)..

This course will introduce students to the major insect and disease problems of North American forests, both native and introduced, with an emphasis on the recognition and management of pests and the damage they cause. Wild land fire, invasive plants, and climate change and their interactions with forest insect and diseases will also be covered.

ANS 281 Professional Development of PreVeterinary Track Students 1. Prerequisite: ZO 160 or BIO 125 or BIO 181 or BIO 183.

This course introduces PreVeterinary track students to the scope of the veterinary profession and to current issues affecting veterinary professionals. The course will help students gain an understanding of the professional requirement of the veterinary school applications. Students will be expected to discuss current animal and public health issues as well as areas of national shortage in the veterinary profession. One Saturday at the NCSU vet school Open House is required (first Saturday in April).

BCH 351 General Biochemistry 4. Prerequisite: (CH 223 or CH 227) and BIO 183.

This course is an introduction to the basic principles of biochemistry. It emphasizes biochemical structures, properties, and functions, including enzyme kinetics and major metabolic processes. It discusses amino acids and proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids. The pathways discussed will include glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, and the Krebs cycle. It can serve as a prerequisite for BCH 452 with permission of the department. This course is designed for those students who are not majoring in Biochemistry and do not require a more comprehensive introduction to biochemistry. It is not intended for graduate students. Credit is not allowed for both BCH 351 and BCH 451.

BIO 330 Evolutionary Biology 3. Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 181and BIO 183.

Principles and patterns of organic evolution. Topics will include the origin of life, patterns of genetic variation, adaptations, natural selection, and the formation of species, the relationship between micro and macroevolution, and the importance of evolution to humans and medicine.

CS 214 Crop Science Laboratory 1. Prerequisite: BIO 181 or BIO 183 or PB 200 or PB 250;Co-requisite: CS 213.

The laboratory's intent is to provide students enrolled in the CS 213 lecture course opportunity to apply under field and controlled environmental conditions the crop production principles introduced in the lecture course. Using a hands-on approach targeting a variety of crop management approaches, students will examine the growth and development characteristics that relate most directly to final yield and quality of the marketed product. Students will employ a spectrum of treatment combinations aimed at strengthening understanding of the interaction of genotype, environment, and management, with the goal of identifying influential factors of crop yield and quality.

MB 360 Scientific Inquiry in Microbiology: At the Bench 3. Prerequisite:CH 101 and BIO 183 (both with a C- or better).

Scientific questions, controls and variables, designing, preparing for and carrying out experiments, keeping a notebook, interpreting results, and presenting their findings: i.e. the pragmatic things a student must know in order to work efficiently in a research lab regardless of the discipline. Prior or current enrollment in MB 352 or MB 354 recommended.

ZO 402 Invertebrate Biology 4. Prerequisite: A grade of C- or better in BIO 181 and BIO 183. Credit is not allowed for both BIO 350 and BIO 402/403..

Over 90% of all animals are invertebrates, and many invertebrate species have proven extremely useful in medical and research applications. This course will survey invertebrate groups or clades (excluding the Protista), and will emphasize their functional biology, phylogeny, ecology, behavior, and use as models in research. Lab will emphasize an experimental approach and will involve work primarily with live material. Students may not receive credit for both BIO 402 and BIO 350 or BIO 140.

PB 421 Plant Physiology 3. Prerequisite: BIO 183 or ZO 160, or PB 200 and CH 220 or CH 221 or CH 225.

Physiology of higher plants with emphasis on biochemical, cell biological and molecular aspects of how plants function. Unique aspects of regulation of plant metabolism including photosynthesis, respiration, nitrogen fixation, cell wall biosynthesis, growth and stress responses will be emphasized. The course is intended for students interested in postgraduate studies in plant biology. Students cannot receive credit for both PB 321 and PB 421.

CS 213 Crop Science 3. Prerequisite: BIO 181 or BIO 183 or PB 200 or PB 250.

Our basic premise is that to produce field crops successfully we must know how our crops grow and develop and what they require from the production environment - including the farmer - for satisfactory management of the relevant environment, and finally to successful yield and quality of commercially important product. Especially important is to understand the various ways in which producers must respond to ever-changing circumstances on the farm, at the bank (credit), and in the marketplace. A solid understanding of the impact of cropping history on the soil and entire ecosystem to be used for the next crop also is vitally important.

BIO 361 Developmental Biology 3. Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 183.

In this course students will discover the amazing journey that cells must take to get from an egg to an embryo, form a mature adult, and reproduce in order to continue the life cycle. Students will relate science to everyday life using developmental biology as a forum to integrate many aspects of biology from the molecules in single cells to the complete organism and how it is influenced by evolution and the environment. Cannot receive credit for both BIO 361 and GN 434.

BME 484 Tissue Engineering Fundamentals 3. Prerequisite: (ZO 160 or BIO 183), CH 221, and (MAE 301 or MSE 301 or CHE 315 or TE 303).

This course covers essential concepts of organ and tissue design and engineering using living components, including cell-based systems and cells/tissues in combination with biomaterials, synthetic materials and/or devices. Topics include: In vivo tissue structure and function; Isolation and culture of primary cells and stem cells; Principles of cellular differentiation; Mass transport processes in cell culture systems; Design, production and seeding of scaffolds for 3D culture; Design of bioreactors to support high-density cell growth; State-of-the-art engineered tissue systems; Clinical translation; and Ethics.

BME 584 Tissue Engineering Fundamentals 3. Prerequisite: BIO 183 and (CH 221 or CH 225) and (MAE 301 or MSE 301 or CHE 315 or TE 303).

This course covers essential concepts of organ and tissue design and engineering using living components, including cell-based systems and cells/tissues in combination with biomaterials, synthetic materials and/or devices. Topics include: In vivo tissue structure and function; Isolation and culture of primary cells and stem cells; Principles of cellular differentiation; Mass transport processes in cell culture systems; Design, production and seeding of scaffolds for 3D culture; Design of bioreactors to support high-density cell growth; State-of-the-art engineered tissue systems; Clinical translation; and Ethics.

BAE 204 Introduction to Environmental and Ecological Engineering 2. Prerequisite: BAE 200 and (BIO 181 or BIO 183); Corequisite: BAE 203 and SSC 200.

Introduction to the principles and applications related to environmental and ecological engineering. Topics include watershed hydrology, nutrient cycling, sources of environmental pollution, and the impact to ecosystems. An overview of different methods employed in these two disciplines to remediate and protect natural resources. Special emphasis on how soil, water, microbial, and plant interactions occur in ecosystems and how they are used to develop treatment technologies.

BEC 363 Foundations of Recombinant Microorganisms for Biomanufacturing 2. Prerequisite: BIO 183.

Introduction to basic biomanufacturing techniques with particular focus on the most commonly used recombinant microbes in industry. Includes microbial identification, metabolism, and growth kinetics; recombinant production and analysis of low molecular weight molecules, alcohols, recombinant enzymes and others. The laboratory portion of this half-semester course provides students with practical experience on basic biomanufacturing techniques carried out in small scale.

ZO 410 Introduction to Animal Behavior 3. Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 181and BIO 183.

Studies in animal behavior in vertebrates and invertebrates, focusing on the mechanisms and evolution of animal behavior. Topics include neural, hormonal, and genetic bases of behavior; foraging; anti-predator defenses; mating systems and sexual selection; social behavior; communication; parental care; territoriality and habitat selection.

ANS 215 Agricultural Genetics 3. Prerequisite: BIO 183 or equivalent or instructor's consent.

To provide an introduction to the science of genetics as applied to agriculture. Emphasis is given to qualitative and quantitative genetics. By the end of this course, students should be able to apply genetic concepts to efficiently solve problems and make predictions necessary for "real-life" agricultural situations.

HS 215 Agricultural Genetics 3. Prerequisite: BIO 183 or equivalent or instructor's consent.

To provide an introduction to the science of genetics as applied to agriculture. Emphasis is given to qualitative and quantitative genetics. By the end of this course, students should be able to apply genetic concepts to efficiently solve problems and make predictions necessary for "real-life" agricultural situations.

BIO 245 Principles of Human Anatomy & Physiology (B): Endocrine, Cardiovascular, Respiratory & Renal Systems 4. Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 183; Cannot receive credit for both this course and BIO 212 or BIO 421.

BIO 245 provides an introduction to the anatomy and physiology of the endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, and renal systems. Fundamental principles addressed throughout the course include (1) maintenance and regulation of homeostasis, (2) communication and control processes throughout the body, (3) integration and interdependence across organ systems, (4) structure-function relationships, and (5) anatomical and physiological adaptation. Together, BIO 240 and BIO 245 provide a strong foundation in human anatomy and physiology (through both lecture and lab) for students preparing for a variety of health-related professions.

BIO 432 Evolutionary Medicine 3. R: Junior or Senior standing; Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 181 or BIO 183 or GN 311..

This course introduces the rapidly emerging field of evolutionary medicine as one approach to appreciating evolution as a unifying principle of biology. The primary goal is for students to better understand the evolutionary nature of many issues connected to human health and to better understand the field of evolution via examples that are medically relevant. The course will require reading and discussing scientific literature. Credit is not allowed for both BIO 432 and BIO 330.

BIO 230 The Science of Studying Dinosaurs 3. Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 181 or BIO 183 or BIO 105.

This course introduces students to the scientific method as applied to the study of dinosaurs and the world in which they lived. Because we cannot directly observe dinosaurs, estimating biological features such as running speed, growth rates, and reproductive and other physiological strategies presents challenges. We will examine a range of biological concepts (including cellular biology and physiology, functional morphology and biomechanics, evolutionary relationships, and paleoecology), as well as geological concepts (such as sedimentology, radiometric dating, plate tectonics, and the geologic time scale) as they apply to dinosaurs as living organisms. An understanding of biology at the introductory college level will be assumed.

PB 250 Plant Biology 4. Prerequisite: BIO 181 and BIO 183.

An introduction for Life Science majors to the ecology, structure, function, processes, reproduction and evolution of higher plants. Students may not receive credit for both PB 200 and PB 250.

BIO 240 Principles of Human Anatomy & Physiology (A): Nervous, Skeletal, Muscular, & Digestive Systems 4. Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 183; Cannot receive credit for both this course and BIO 212 or BIO 421.

BIO 240 provides an introduction to the anatomy and physiology of the nervous, skeletal, muscular, and digestive systems. Fundamental principles addressed throughout the course include (1) maintenance and regulation of homeostasis, (2) communication and control processes throughout the body, (3) integration and interdependence across organ systems, (4) structure-function relationships, and (5) anatomical and physiological adaptation. Together, BIO 240 and BIO 245 provide a strong foundation in human anatomy and physiology (through both lecture and lab) for students preparing for a variety of health-related professions.