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Department of Foreign Language and Literatures

https://fll.chass.ncsu.edu/

Opportunities

The expansion of international relations makes the knowledge of foreign languages a critical need for today’s professional. The student of foreign languages is not limited to teaching, translating or interpreting. There are careers in politics, diplomacy, commerce, business, agriculture, science, and research in which a thorough knowledge of foreign languages and cultures is crucial for success. The demand for multilingual personnel extends to all fields of human enterprise and will continue to grow in the coming years.

Bachelor of Arts in Foreign Languages and Literatures (concentrations in Arabic Language and Culture, Asian Language, French, German Studies, or Spanish)

All the general requirements for Bachelor of Arts degree must be met. Degree designations are B.A. in Foreign Languages and Literatures. Major concentrations in Arabic Language and Culture, Asian Language, French Language and Literatures, German Studies, Spanish Language and Literatures, and Foreign Language Education with a French, German, or Spanish option.

Outstanding students may become members of the Pi Delta Phi, French Honor Society, Sigma Delta Pi, National Hispanic Honor Society, or of Delta Phi Alpha, German Honor Society.

Major in Foreign Language Education with French, German, or Spanish Teaching Option

In collaboration with the College of Education and the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures offers a program leading to a French, German, or Spanish teaching license in North Carolina, grades K-12.

Programs Abroad

Summer study programs are offered in Austria, France, Italy, Spain, and Peru.

Minors in Foreign Language, Literatures, and Cultures

Minor programs in the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures include courses in language, literature, and civilization. The minor program requires 15 hours of study in Arabic, Chinese Studies, Classical Studies, French, German, Hindi-Urdu, Italian Studies, Japanese, Japan Studies, Persian, Portuguese, Russian Studies, or Spanish.

Undergraduate students majoring in any area of study at NC State are eligible to minor in a foreign language. Students may not, however, major and minor in the same language.

English as a Second Language (ESL)

The English as a Second Language program serves the academic and professional language needs of international university students. Courses are designed to help both undergraduate and graduate students perfect their language skills. The ESL program administers the Speaking Proficiency English Assessment Kit (SPEAK) for potential graduate teaching assistants to measure their oral English proficiency.  

ESL Add-On Licensure for K-12 teachers

The ESL program provides an ESL teacher licensure program for undergraduates enrolled in teacher education and for currently licensed North Carolina public school teachers.

TESOL Certificate Program

This non-degree hybrid program which includes a 30-hour internship is designed for those who are interested in teaching English abroad and in community colleges, and working and volunteering in immigrant communities. Students earn a TESOL Certificate in one semester.

Summer Institute in English

The Summer Institute in English offers intensive, communicative instruction and practice to students, business people, and professionals pursuing more advanced proficiency in English.

 

Head

R. V. Gross


Associate Head

D. M. Marchi


Assistant Head for Student Affairs

S.G. Navey-Davis


Scheduling Officer

A.C. Wright


Distinguished Professor

G.A. Dawes


Professors

T.P. Feeny

M.D. Garval

R.V. Gross

H. A. Jaimes

D. M. Marchi

J. Mari

J.A. Pasten

Y.B. Rollins

E. Tai


Professors Emeriti

G.F. Gonzalez

J.R. Kelly

M.A. Witt


Associate Professors

V. Bilenkin

H.G. Braunbeck

M.A. Darhower

J.S. Despain

S.E. Garrigan

N.K. Isaacson

J.P. Mertz

J. Michnowicz

S.S. Mody

L.A. Mykyta

V.A. Wust


Associate Professors Emeriti

R.A. Alder

S.T. Alonso

M.M. Magill

M.L. Salstad

S.E. Simonsen


Assistant Professors

M. Eley

L.K. Nyota

R.E. Ronquest


Teaching Associate Professors

G. Mathews

I. Stern


Teaching Assistant Professors

C.J. Block

J.H. Brown

J.S. Haeseler

L. Kube

I.T. Messiha

N. Phukan

M.A. Reibold

A.M. Turner

K.A. Villa-Garcia


Senior Lecturers

J. Khater

J. McConnell

S.G. Navey-Davis

C. Quarterman

S.F. Sotillo

A.C. Wright

H.S. Young


Senior Lecturer Emeriti

T.P. Brody


Lecturers

J.L. Allen

A.R. Bonaduce-Dresler

L.K. Call

D.A. Carson

Z. Chen

K.A. Coachman

J.A. Despain

B.J. Farag

I.N. Galisteo

A.E. Gray

T.K.L. Hoversten

D.T. Kane

R.M. Kube

M. Mohaghegh

K. Morel

R. Nitta

J. Pybus

S.M. Sferuzzo

N.M. Swisher

K. Ueda

L.A. Villagarcía

J.L. Widener

M.C. Woodbridge

CLA - Foreign Language-Classical Studies Courses

CLA 110 Greek and Latin Roots of English 3.

Study of the formation of English words from Greek and Latin roots, designed to build English vocabulary and word power (Students who plan to enter medical professions should take CLA 115. Students may not receive credit for both CLA 110 and CLA 115.).

CLA 115 Medical Terminology 3.

Study of the formation of medical terms from their Greek and Latin roots designed both to build vocabulary and to teach the uses of a medical dictionary. Students may not receive credit for both CLA 110 and CLA 115.

CLA 210 Classical Mythology 3.

Greek and Roman mythology through the writings and art of the Classical period. Discussion of creation stories, the major gods and heroes, the underworld and afterlife, intellectual, religious and educational role of myth, and the most important theories of interpretation and classification. All readings and discussion in English.

CLA 215 The Ancient World in Modern Media 3.

Study of the ways classical myth and culture appear in modern media such as film, TV, comics, the internet and others, with focus on why ancient stories, ideas and images are still appealing, but also how and hwy they are used in new ways with new meanings.

CLA 320 Masterpieces of Classical Lit 3.
R: Sophomore Standing.

Study of great works of Greek and Latin Literature in a genre such as tragedy, comedy, epic or lyric, with attention to both literary merit and cultural importance. All readings in English. May be taken up to three times in different genres for credit.

CLA 325 Gender, Ethnicity & Identity in the Ancient World 3.
R: Sophomore Standing.

Study of the formation of ideas and practices regarding gender, ethnicity, and identity in the ancient Greek and Roman world, with attention to both continuities and difference between ancient and modern views.

CLA 395 Special Topics in Classical Studies 3.

For topics not part of regular course offerings, or offering of new courses on a trial basis. May be taken up to three times provided the topics are different.

CLA 398 Independent Study in Classical Studies 1-3.
R: Sophomore Standing.

Individualized study in classical language, culture or literature. Topic, mode of study, and credit hours to be determined in consultation with faculty member supervising work. May be taken up to three times provided the topic is sufficiently different. Individualized/Independent Study and Research courses require a "Course Agreement for Students Enrolled in Non-Standard Courses" be completed by the student and faculty member prior to registration by the department.

FL - Foreign Languages Courses

FL 216 Art and Society in France 3.

An overview of the visual arts in France, defined broadly, and their relationship to French society and culture: painting, architecture, photography, cinema, book production, gardens, fashion, food, television, popular culture, and mass media, including the Internet. The principal themes of the course are how France's cultural heritage is embodied in its rich tradition of visual expression and how artists' visual expressions have either served to represent, glorify, or critique the nation.

FL 219 Studies in Great Works of Non-Western Literature 3.

Readings, in English translation, or non-Western literary masterpieces from the beginnings of literacy in the Middle East, Asia, and Africa to the modern period, including excerpts from texts such as the Upanishads, the Ramayana, the Sundiata, Gilgamesh, A Thousand and One Nights, and the Quran and such authors as Confucius, Oe Kenzaburo, Omar Khayyam, Rumi, and Amos Oz.

FL 220 Studies in Great Works of Western Literature 3.

Readings, in English translation, of Western literary masterpieces, from the beginnings of literacy in the Middle East and Europe towards the present, including such authors as Homer, Sophocles, Virgil, Ovid, Augustine, Danta, Machiavelli, Shakespeare, Cervantes, Moliere, Voltaire, Goethe, Austen, Flaubert, Dickinson, Tolstoy, Kafka, and Woolf.Credit will not be given for both ENG/FL 220 and either ENG/FL 221 or ENG/FL 222.

FL 221 Literature of the Western World I 3.

Readings from English translations of Biblical, Classical, Medieval, and Early Renaissance literature, including works by such authors as Homer, Plato, Virgil, Ovid, St. Paul, St. Augustine, Marie de France, and Dante.

FL 222 Literature of the Western World II 3.

Readings from English translations of Renaissance, Neo-Classical, Romantic, and Early Modern literature, emphasizing the cultures of continental Europe from the Renaissance to 1900, and including such authors as Petrarch, Erasmus, Rabelais, Machiavelli, Shakespeare, Moliere, Voltaire, Rousseau, Goethe, Flaubert, Tolstoy.

FL 223 Contemporary World Literature I 3.
Prerequisite: ENG 112.

Twentieth-century literature of some of the following cultures: Russian, Eastern European, Western European, Latin American, Canadian, Australian.

FL 224 Contemporary World Literature II 3.
Prerequisite: ENG 112.

Twentieth-century literature of some of the following cultures: Asian, Arabian, African, Caribbean, Native-American.

FL 246 Literature of the Holocaust 3.

Fictional and nonfictional versions of the Holocaust, focusing on themes of survival, justice, theology, and the limits of human endurance.

FL 295 Special Topics in Foreign Languages and/or Literatures 1-6.

A special projects course on topics to be determined as needed in the departmental program.

FL 298 Independent Study in Foreign Language or Literature 1-6.

Individualized study in a foreign language or literature. Topic, mode of study and credit hours to be determined in consultation with the faculty member supervising work. Individualized/Independent Study and Research courses require a "Course Agreement for Students Enrolled in Non-Standard Courses" be completed by the student and faculty member prior to registration by the department.

FL 299 Field Experience for 21st Century Teaching 1.
Prerequisite: ECI 204 and ED 204.

This course has a required fieldwork component in local K-12 schools, and students are responsible for their own transportation to and from the schools. Students are required to purchase internship liability insurance to participate in this course. Contact University Insurance & Risk Management for details on acquiring the insurance and the current charge. This course is restricted to Foreign Language Education majors.

FL 392 Major World Author 3.

Intensive study in English, of the writings of one (or two) author(s) from outside the English and American traditions. Sample subjects: Homer, Virgil and Ovid, Lady Murasaki, Marie de France and Christine de Pizan, Dante, Cervantes, Goethe, Balzacand Flaubert, Kafka, Proust, Lessing and Gordimer, Borges and Marquez, Neruda, Achebe, Soyinka, Calvino, Walcott and Naipaul. Topics will vary from semester to semester.May be repeated for credit with new topic.

FL 393 Studies in Literary Genre 3.

Concentrated treatment of one literary genre, such as the epic, the lyric, the drama, satire, romance, autobiography, the essay, the novel, or the short story. Treatment of materials from several national or ethnic cultures and several periods. All readings in English. Course may be taken three times for credit.Course may be taken 3 times in different genres.

FL 394 Studies in World Literature 3.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and above.

Study of a subject in world literature: for example, African literature, Asian literature, Hispanic literature, East European literature, Comedy, the Epic, the Lyric, Autobiography, the Faust legend, or Metamorphosis. Subjects vary according to availability of faculty. Readings in English translation.

FL 395 Study Abroad Programs 1-3.

Specific category of courses involving language and/or culture taught in foreign countries through the Department Study Abroad Program.

FL 406 Modernism 3.

International Modernist movement in literature, from its nineteenth-century origins to its culmination in the early twentieth century. Definitions of modernity, as embodied in a variety of genres. Placement of Modernist texts within a variety of cultures that produced them.

FL 407 Postmodernism 3.

Literary expressions of Postmodernism, from its origins in the Modernist movement through its culmination in the later decades of the twentieth century. Definitions of post modernity, as embodied in a variety of genres. Placement of Postmodernist texts within a variety of cultures that have produced them.

FL 424 Linguistics for ESL Professionals 3.

Study of the diachronic nature of language and the phonological, morphological, syntactic, and semantic features of English in relation to other world language groups. Application of linguistic principles to the ESL classroom. Analysis of common errors in grammar due to first language interference. Discussion of teaching strategies based on current research in second-language acquisition. Credit will not be given for both FL 424 and FL 524.

FL 427 Methods and Materials in Teaching English as a Second Language 3.

Methodologies and current approaches to teaching English as a Second Language. Techniques and strategies for teaching reading, writing, listening, speaking and culture. Selection, adaptation, and creation of instructional materials for various levels of proficiency and teaching situations. Evaluation and assessment of written and oral language proficiency through standardized and non-standardized assessment tools. Students cannot receive credit for both FL/ECI 427 and FL/ECI 527.

FL 439 Perspectives on English as a New Language 3.
Prerequisite: Admission to ESL Teacher Licensure, Corequisite: NC teaching license in any area.

Examination of the complexity of multiculturalism in American society and the challenges faced by immigrant families in adapting to U.S. institutions. Emphasis on understanding historical, legal, cultural and pedagogical issues with respect to learning English as a new language (ENL).

FL 440 Internship in Teaching English as a Second Language 3.
Prerequisite: Admission to ESL Licensure Program, Corequisite: Teacher Licensure in any primary area.

Skills and techniques required in teaching ESL in a public school setting. 15 hours of classroom observation and 30 hours in direct instruction. Demonstration of competencies essential for teaching ESL. Individualized/Independent Study and Research courses require a Course Agreement for Students Enrolled in Non-Standard Courses be completed by the student and faculty member prior to registration by the department.

FL 492 Senior Seminar in Foreign Languages & Literatures 3.
Prerequisite: FLJ 301 or FLC 301 or FLN 301 or FLA 301.

Senior seminar for foreign language majors with concentration in non-European / less-commonly taught languages. Focus on recent trends in scholarship, career guidance, senior research projects or equivalent. Conducted in English. Students will be required to provide a detailed summary of their project in the language of their concentration.

FL 495 Special Topics in Foreign Languages and Literatures 1-6.

A concentrated study of a special period, author or genre to be determined as needed in the departmental program.

FL 498 Independent Study in Foreign Language or Literature 1-6.

Individualized study of a foreign language or literature. Topic, mode of study, and credit hours to be determined in consultation with the faculty member supervising work. Individualized/Independent Study and Research courses require a "Course Agreement for Students Enrolled in Non-Standard Courses" be completed by the student and faculty member prior to registration by the department.

FL 505 Issues and Trends in Foreign Language Education: Theory & Practice 3.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

An exploration of theory and practice issues related to foreign language teaching. Inquiry into proficiency-oriented instruction, innovative methodological approaches, the National Standards and learning scenarios, integrating culture, options for testing and assessment, content-based instruction, the role of grammar in second language acquisition, teaching foreign language students with learning disabilities, and Foreign Language in the Elementary School (FLES) in North Carolina. Students will examine case studies related to these topics and engage in a classroom action research project.

FL 506 Instructional Technology in Foreign Language Education: Addressing the National 3.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Hands-on experience in appropriately selecting and applying a number of instructional technologies to foreign language teaching and learning in relation to the current National Standards. Analysis and use of effective technology tools including hardware, software, and courseware. Emphasis will be on the application of Technology-Enhanced Language Learning (TELL) as it integrates the National Standards' goals of Communication, Cultures, Connections, Comparisons, and Communities.

FL 507 College Teaching of Foreign Languages 3.
Prerequisite: Graduate status.

Principles of second language acquisition and foreign language pedagogy. Examination of problematic concepts in teaching Spanish and French. Thorough treatment of instructional technology appropriate to foreign language teaching and learning. Regular observation of practicing instructors and micro-teaching in college-level Spanish or French classes. Credit not given for both FL 507 and either FL/ECI 505 or FL/ECI 506. Course taught in English. Required for new FLL Teaching Assistants.

FL 508 Second Language Acquisition Research: Interlanguage Development 3.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing or Permission of the Instructor.

This course introduces students to the objectives, methods, and findings of research investigating how classroom learners acquire French and Spanish as a second language. It examines specific features of French and Spanish interlanguage including: grammatical gender, copular ser/estar and idiomatic uses of etre/avoir, pronominalization, verbal systems, and longitudinal/cross-sections studies of interlanguage development. Course content bridges the gap between second language acquisition research, foreign language teaching methodology courses, and curriculum implementation. Graduate standing or consent of instructor required.

FL 524 Linguistics for ESL Professionals 3.

Study of the diachronic nature of language and the phonological, morphological, syntactic, and semantic features of English in relation to other world language groups. Application of linguistic principles to the ESL classroom. Analysis of common errors in grammar due to first language interference. Discussion of teaching strategies based on current research in second-language acquisition. Credit will not be given for both FL 424 and FL 524.

FL 527 Methods and Materials in Teaching English as a Second Language 3.

Methodologies and current approaches to teaching English as a Second Language. Techniques and strategies for teaching reading, writing, listening, speaking and culture. Selection, adaptation, and creation of instructional materials for various levels of proficiency and teaching situations. Evaluation and assessment of written and oral language proficiency through standardized and non-standardized assessment tools. Students cannot receive credit for both FL/ECI 427 and FL/ECI 527.

FL 539 Seminar In World Literature 3.

Rotating topics in world literature, including treatment of the subject's theoretical or methodological framework. Possible subjects: colonialism and literature; orality and literature; the Renaissance; the Enlightenment; translation; comparison ofNorth and South American literatures; African literary traditions; post-modernism and gender. Readings in English (original languages encouraged but not required).

FL 541 Literary and Cultural Theory 3.

A survey of literary theory in the 20th century from New Criticism to postmodernism. Examines the virtues and pitfalls of these approaches to the study of culture and literature. A course on issues, concepts, theorists and the sociohistorical and political context in which the theorists are writing. Taught in English. No formal pre-requisites. However, students who have not had advanced literature will be disadvantaged.

FL 595 Special Topics in Foreign Languages and Literatures 1-6.

A concentrated study of a special period, author or genre to be determined as needed in the departmental program.

FLA - Foreign Languages and Literatures - Arabic Courses

FLA 101 Beginning Arabic 101 3.

Beginning Arabic is for students who have had no prior experience with the language. It is the first in a series of courses which develop reading and writing skills in Modern Standard Arabic with active speaking and listening skills in both formal Arabic and the Egyptian dialect. Authentic materials from the Arabic media will be used in addition to text-related video and audio materials. An introduction to Arab culture will be integrated throughout the semester.This course is designed for true beginners who have had no previous experience with the Arabic language, either written or spoken. Credit will be allowed for either FLA 101 or FLA 111, but nor for both.

FLA 102 Beginning Arabic 102 3.
Prerequisite: FLA 101 or 111.

This course is the second in a series which develops reading and writing skills in Modern Standard Arabic with active speaking and listening skills in both formal Arabic and the Egyptian dialect. Authentic materials from the Arabic media will be used in addition to text-related video and audio materials. An introduction to Arab culture will be integrated throughout the semester.Credit will be allowed for either FLA 102 or FLA 112, but not for both.

FLA 103 Beginning Arabic 101 Conversation 1.
Corequisite: FLA 101.

Supplements conversational practice for FLA 101 to help students develop oral proficiency at the beginning level. Students will practice using their speaking skills in a variety of individual and group activities to build competency in basic social situations.

FLA 104 Beginning Arabic 102 Conversation 1.
Prerequisite:FLA 103; Corequisite: FLA 102.

Supplements conversational practice for FLA 102 to help students develop oral proficiency at the advanced beginning level. Students will practice using their speaking skills in a variety of individual and group activities to build competency in basic social situations.

FLA 201 Intermediate Arabic I 3.
Prerequisite: FLA 102 or FLA 112.

Intermediate Arabic I is the third in a series of courses which develop reading and writing skills in Modern Standard Arabic with active speaking and listening skills in both formal Arabic and the Egyptian dialect. An increased emphasis is placed onthe acquisition of vocabulary and grammatical tools necessary to undertake more in-depth readings and discussions of news articles from the Arab media. Authentic materials from the Arab media will be used in addition to text-related video and audio materials.

FLA 202 Intermediate Arabic II 3.
Prerequisite: FLA 201.

Intermediate Arabic II is the fourth in a series of courses which develop reading and writing skills in Modern Standard Arabic with active speaking and listening skills in both formal Arabic and the Egyptian dialect. A continued emphasis is placed on the acquisition of vocabulary and grammatical tools necessary to undertake more in-depth readings and discussions of news articles from the Arab media. Authentic materials from the Arab media will be used in addition to text-related video and audiomaterials.

FLA 203 Intermediate Arabic Conversation I 1.
Prerequisite: FLA 102.

Supplements conversational practice for FLA level 201 or higher. This course helps students develop oral proficiency at the intermediate level. Students will practice using their speaking skills in a variety of individual and group activities to build competency in various social situations.

FLA 204 Intermediate Arabic Conversation II 1.
Prerequisite: FLA 201.

Supplements conversational practice for FLA level 202 or higher. This course helps students develop oral proficiency at the intermediate high level. Students will practice using their speaking skills in a variety of individual and group activities to build competency in various social situations.

FLA 301 Advanced Intermediate Arabic I 3.

Advanced Intermediate Arabic I is the fifth in a series of courses which develop whole language skills in Modern Standard Arabic with active speaking and listening skills in the Egyptian dialect. Upon completion of this course the student will havethe tools necessary to understand and produce all the basic structures of Modern Standard Arabic. Arabic film and media will be used in class. The student will also be introduced to selected short stories from modern Arabic literature.

FLA 318 Egyptian Culture through Film 3.

This course offers a survey of cinema in modern Egypt using film as a medium to learn about the cultural and social structures in Egypt. The course incorporates weekly screenings of feature films representing different styles and periods. Students will be required to read relevant material, take essay exam questions, write film reviews, a final paper, and give a presentation of their final paper. The course is taught in English.

FLA 330 Media Arabic 3.
Prerequisite:FLA 202.

An introduction to the language of print and Internet news media of the Arab world, using authentic materials from Arabic newspapers, Internet news sites, and magazines. This course provides students with the tools necessary to build a core media vocabulary base, comprehend front page news stories, read critically, and detect bias, in selected news content, and develop listening skills necessary for understanding oral news reports.

FLA 440 Modern Arabic Short Story 3.
Prerequisite: FLA 301 or FLA 330.

An advanced language skills course which introduces students to contemporary Arabic literature through selected readings of modern Arabic short stories. Students will develop an understanding of this rich literary genre as a reflection of concurrent social structures, political landscapes, and cultural traditions in Middle Eastern societies. Emphasis will also be placed on recognizing advanced grammatical structures in Modern Standard Arabic with attention given to the increased use of vernacular expression in modern literary works. Assigned readings, writing assignments, and class discussions will be in Arabic.

FLC - Foreign Language - Chinese Courses

FLC 101 Elementary Chinese I 3.
Corequisite: FLC 103.

Introduction to Modern Standard Chinese. Emphasis on speaking and listening with an introduction to reading, writing and Chinese culture.

FLC 102 Elementary Chinese II 3.
Corequisite: FLC 104.

Continuation of basic skills. Emphasis on speaking and listening with some reading, writing and Chinese culture.

FLC 103 Elementary Chinese I Conversation 1.
Corequisite: FLC 101.

Supplements conversational practice and handwriting skills for FLC 101. Students will gain practice at using their speaking skills in a variety of basic social situations.

FLC 104 Elementary Chinese II Conversation 1.
Prerequisite: FLC 101 and FLC 103; Corequisite: FLC 102.

Supplements conversational practice and handwriting skills for FLC 102. Students are encouraged to use their speaking skills in a variety of typical social situations. Special attention is given to naturalness of speech.

FLC 201 Intermediate Chinese I 3.
Corequisite: FLC 203.

Continuation of basic skills. Greater emphasis on reading, writing and Chinese cultural traditions.

FLC 202 Intermediate Chinese II 3.
Corequisite: FLC 204.

Continuation of basic skills. Focus on reading, writing, Chinese cultural traditions and patterns of behavior.

FLC 203 Intermediate Chinese I Conversation 1.
Prerequisite: FLC 102 and FLC 104; Corequisite: FLC 201.

Supplements conversational practice and handwriting skills for FLC 201. Students are encouraged to use their speaking skills in a variety of situations. Special attention is given to naturalness of speech and intonation.

FLC 204 Intermediate Chinese II Conversation 1.
Prerequisite: FLC 201 and FLC 203; Corequisite: FLC 202.

Supplements conversational practice and handwriting skills for FLC 202. Students are encouraged to use their speaking skills in a variety of situations. Special attention is given to naturalness of speech and intonation.

FLC 301 Intermediate Chinese III 3.
Prerequisite: FLC 202.

Last of the foundation courses in Chinese. Continued practice in speaking and understanding Chinese with new emphasis on writing and on the reading of cultural and literary texts.

FLC 302 Intermediate Chinese IV 3.
Prerequisite: FLC 301.

Continued practice in speaking and understanding Chinese with greater emphasis on reading and writing. Continued study of cultural and literary texts.

FLC 351 Modern Chinese Popular Culture 3.

Introduction to basic aspects of cultural practices and production in Chinese society, including consumer culture, education, work life, family relationships, everyday religious practices, aesthetic traditions, national identity, and gender. Reading and analysis of representative works of modern Chinese visual and print culture including literature, film, advertising, digital media and consumer products with attention to cultural analysis as well as to historical and cultural background.

FLC 401 Advanced Chinese: Readings in Literature and Social Sciences 3.
Prerequisite:FLC 302.

Continued training in the foundations of Chinese language, with emphasis on nuances of written Chinese. This course introduces advanced Chinese language students to modern literature and social science texts. Students read and analyze some of the finest works of 20th c. Chinese intellectuals, authors and social critics. The class explores a wide range of prose forms, styles, and subject matter. Emphasis will be placed on developing advanced-level proficiency in reading & writing, and on literary analysis & discussion of cultural & historical contexts.

FLC 402 Advanced Chinese: Readings in Literature and Science 3.
Prerequisite:FLC 302.

Continued training in the foundations of Chinese language, with emphasis on nuances of written Chinese. This course introduces advanced Chinese language students to modern literature and science texts. Students read and analyze some of the finest works of 20th c. Chinese intellectuals, authors and proponents of scientific advancement as well as original scientific research in Chinese. The class explores a wide range of prose forms, styles, and subject matter. Emphasis will be placed on developing advanced-level proficiency in reading & writing, and on literary analysis & discussion of cultural & historical contexts.

FLE - Foreign Language - English Courses

FLE 100 Introduction to Academic Writing 4.

For non-native speakers of English. Intensive introduction to critical writing and reading in academic contexts. Exploration of writing processes and academic literacy skills: interpreting assignments; comprehending, analyzing, and evaluating college-level texts; inventing, drafting, and revising; seeking, providing, and responding to constructive feedback; collaborating effectively under varied learning models. Extensive writing practice and individualized coaching. Attention to grammar and conventions of standard written English. Intended as preparation for FLE 101.Only for non-native speakers of English. Requires C- or better. Credit for FLE 100 is not allowed if student has prior credit for FLE 101.

FLE 101 Academic Writing and Research 4.
Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in FLE 100 or placement via ESL testing guidelines..

For non-native speakers of English intensive instruction in academic writing and research. Basic principles of rhetoric and strategies for academic inquiry and argument. Instruction and practice in critical reading, including the generative and responsible use of print and electronic sources for academic research, adapted for non-native speakers. Exploration of literate practices across a range of academic domains, laying the foundation for further writing development in college. Continued attention to grammar and conventions of standard written English. Satisfies freshman English requirements. Successful completion of FLE 101 requires a C- or better. Credit for FLE 101 is not allowed if the student has already fulfilled the first-year writing requirement.

FLE 201 Oral Communication in English for International Students 3.

Oral communication in English; active and interactive speaking skills, listening comprehension and reading. Specific tasks in spoken English such as communicating information, making inquiries, requests and complaints. Individual and group work inthe form of oral reports, role play, presentations, etc. Listening to lectures and note taking skills.

FLE 400 American English Pronunciation for International Students 3.

Intensive pronunciation practice for non-native speakers of English. Emphasis on improved intelligibility through practice on English rhythm, stress and intonation. Individual and class work on vowel and consonant difficulties.

FLE 401 Advanced Oral Communication in English for International Students 3.

Oral communication in English; pronunciation skills, reading, aural comprehension and oral skills; communication strategies and cross-cultural communication; individual and group activities such as presenting information, teaching a class, fielding questions and leading a discussion.

FLE 402 Advanced Written Communication in English for International Students 3.

Written communication skills for graduate students; integrated writing tasks focusing on writing, reading, grammar and comprehension, specifically geared to the needs of research students and teaching assistants. Reading, critical analysis and synthesis of written material such as journal articles, research reports, etc.

FLF - Foreign Language - French Courses

FLF 101 Elementary French I 3.

First in a four-course sequence to develop language skills. Oral and written practice in classroom and language laboratory. Readings in French culture and civilization.

FLF 102 Elementary French II 3.
Prerequisite: FLF 101.

Continuation of FLF 101 with intensive practice in spoken French. Readings in French culture and civilization.

FLF 110 Accelerated Elementary French 3.
Prerequisite: Placement into this course determined by The Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures Placement Test: http://sasw.chass.ncsu.edu/fl/place.htm.

Content of FLF 101 and 102, at an accelerated pace, for students with previous study of French (1-2 years in high school) who placed into the course based on results of the NC State French Placement Test. Includes a refresher of 101 material beforecovering 102 material. Development of skills in listening, speaking, reading, writing and understanding Francophone cultures. Significant amount of work outside of class. Fulfills the FL 102 requirement.

FLF 201 Intermediate French I 3.
Prerequisite: FLF 102 or FLF 110.

Third of four consecutive courses to develop skills of speaking, listening, reading and writing. Readings and discussions of French culture, civilization and literature.

FLF 202 Intermediate French II 3.
Prerequisite: FLF 201.

Last of four sequential language courses. Increased emphasis on reading and writing. Readings in the literature, culture, and civilization of France and the Francophone world.

FLF 212 French: Language, Culture, and Technology 3.
Prerequisite: FLF 102 or FLF 110.

A study of the language structures and vocabulary necessary for an intermediate level of communication in French together with cultural and technological issues of our global society, in the context of the French-speaking world and the European Union. Students are responsible for providing their own transportation for required field trip. Fulfills the FLF 201 requirement.

FLF 301 Survey of French Literature from the Middle Ages through the Enlightenment 3.
Prerequisite: An advanced language skills course (FLF 308, 310, 315) or FLF 202 with permission of instructor.

Reading and discussion of representative works with attention to literary analysis as well as to historical and cultural background.

FLF 302 Survey of French Literature from Romanticism to the Contemporary Period 3.
Prerequisite: An advanced language skills course (FLF 308, 310, 315) or FLF 202 with Consent of Instructor.

Reading and discussion of representative works with attention to literary analysis as well as to historical and cultural background.

FLF 306 French Business Communication 3.
Prerequisite: FLF 202.

Study of major forms of written and oral business communication used in the French-speaking world. Extensive work with current, culturally authentic materials. Emphasis on development of practical communicative skills, with special attention to cross-cultural comparisons of French and American business practices and modes of communication.

FLF 307 Business French 3.
Prerequisite: FLF 202.

Business French vocabulary and concepts with emphasis on cultural differences and their importance in the new global village business world.

FLF 308 Advanced Conversation: Contemporary French Cultures 3.
Prerequisite: FLF 202.

Conversation and reading emphasizing idiomatic and practical usage with attention to contemporary civilization and cultures of the French speaking world. Emphasis on social structures, political features, events, world views and modes of communication.

FLF 309 French Phonetics and Pronunciation 3.
Prerequisite: FLF 202.

A study of the oral production of standard French with the aim of improving pronunciation, fluency and skill in communication. Extensive oral practice through conversation and phonetics.

FLF 310 Advanced Written Communication 3.
Prerequisite: FLF 202.

An in-depth study of French written communication at the advanced level, including the more advanced aspects of the French grammar with extensive writing practice serving a variety of practical communicative needs.

FLF 315 French Civilization and Culture 3.
Prerequisite: FLF 202.

French civilization and culture from its origins to the modern period. Reading and discussion of the social, cultural, economic and political structures of France, including its geography, history, music, art and national consciousness.

FLF 318 The Heritage of French Cinema 3.
Prerequisite: 3 hrs. in French at 300 level.

Survey of the major contributions of French cinema from its origins to the present. Attention to film as an artistic medium and to the cinematic representation of French history and culture. Reading, discussion, and viewing of films including Un Chien Andalou, La Passion de Jeanne d'Arc, Le Retour de Martin Guerre, La Marseillaise, Les 400 Coups, and Diva.

FLF 321 French Cultures and Contexts 3.
Prerequisites: FLF 308 and FLF 310.

An approach to important periods in the history of French culture through the reading of texts by several important writers. Films, slides, painting, music, and the Internet will be included to put the readings in a cultural context.

FLF 401 French Graduate Reading 3.

Basic French grammar, with special attention to characteristics of formal expository style, and illustrative readings. Study of extracts from scholarly publications in students' areas of research. Prepares students to take the graduate foreign language certification exam.

FLF 411 Approaches to French Translation 3.
Prerequisite: at least two French (FLF) 300 level courses.

Intensive practice of translating to and from French a variety of texts selected from the areas of business, law, technology and science, as well as literature and the arts. Focus on Documentation, Research and Translation techniques and ethics.

FLF 414 Studies in French Prose 3.
Prerequisite: 3 hrs in French at 300 level with 3 hrs in literature.

Major developments in the French essay, letter, novel and other prose forms from the Renaissance to 1900. Readings from such authors as Montaigne, Sevigne, Lafayette, Rousseau, Sand, Balzac, Stendhal, Flaubert.

FLF 425 Literature, Cinema and Culture of the Francophone World 3.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

A study of a number of literary texts and films from across the spectrum of the Francophone world - West Africa, the Maghreb, and the Caribbean. Through these texts and films we will study the diversity of the French colonial empire as well as the different historical, political and cultural effects of colonialism and postcolonialism. Films, videos, internet sites will be used.Course taught in French.

FLF 492 Seminar in French Studies 3.
Prerequisite: Junior standing and 6 hrs in French literature.

A small-group study of a topic in literature resulting in either a substantial essay or series of essays by each student. Topics vary each semester.

FLF 502 Variety in Language: French 3.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Structure and evolution of the French language. A study of language variety in the French-speaking world. Attention to the historical evolution of the language through time, and an analysis of the phonological, morphological and syntactic featuresof modern French. Use of the World Wide Web will enable students to access material from many parts of the Globe.Course taught in French.

FLF 511 Approaches to French Translation 3.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Intensive practice of translating to and from French a variety of texts selected from the areas of business, law, technology and science, as well as literature and the arts. Focus on Documentation, Research and Translation techniques and ethics.Course taught in French. Credit not allowed for both 411 & 511.

FLF 516 Art and Society in France 3.

An overview of the visual arts in France, defined broadly, and their relationship to French society and culture: painting, architecture, photography, cinema, book production, gardens, fashion, cuisine, television, popular culture, and mass media will be studied.Course taught in French.

FLF 521 French Cultures and Contexts 3.
Prerequisite: Graduate status required for FLF 521.

Study of important periods in the history of French culture through the reading of key literary texts. Films, slides, painting, music, and the Internet will be included to put the readings in a cultural context. Topics vary. Students cannot get credit for both 421/521.

FLF 525 Literature, Cinema and Culture of the Francophone World 3.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

A study of a number of literary texts and films from across the spectrum of the Francophone world - West Africa, the Maghreb, and the Caribbean. Through these texts and films we will study the diversity of the French colonial empire as well as the different historical, political and cultural effects of colonialism and postcolonialism. Films, videos, internet sites will be used.Course taught in French.

FLF 592 Seminar in French Studies 3.
Prerequisite: At least one 400-level French class; Graduate standing.

Seminar on literary, linguistic, or cultural topic in French studies. Research paper and oral presentation required. Conducted entirely in French. Rotating topics.Credit not allowed for both 492 and 592.

FLF 595 Special Topics in French 3-6.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

In depth exploration of specialized topics in French literature, culture or language. Also used to test and develop new courses.Course taught in French.

FLF 630 Independent Study in French 1-3.

Individualized study in French language or literature at the graduate level. Topic and mode of study to be determined in consultation with the faculty member supervising work.

FLF 675 Special Project in French 1-3.
Prerequisite: Student must be in final semester of his or her program..

Individual project in French language or literature at the graduate level. Topic and mode of study to be determined in consultation with student's project advisory committee within the parameters of specific options.

FLF 688 Non-Thesis Masters Continuous Registration - Half Time Registration 1.
Prerequisite: Master's student.

For students in non-thesis master's programs who have completed all credit hour requirements for their degree but need to maintain half-time continuous registration to complete incomplete grades, projects, final master's exam, etc.

FLG - Foreign Language - German Courses

FLG 101 Elementary German I 3.

The first in a four-course sequence to develop the language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Emphasis on the acquisition of everyday German and cultural awareness. Active class participation, practice in the language lab and computer lab, and written assignments.

FLG 102 Elementary German II 3.
Prerequisite: FLG 101.

Second in a four-course sequence to develop the language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Emphasis on the acquisition of everyday German and cultural awareness. Active class participation, practice in the language lab and computer lab, and written assignments.

FLG 201 Intermediate German I 3.
Prerequisite: FLG 102.

The third of four consecutive courses in German. Intensive conversational practice to develop proficiency in speaking and listening, advanced reading and writing skills by learning complex grammatical structures and through the use of authentic texts. Acquisition of cultural knowledge about the German-speaking countries.

FLG 202 Intermediate German II 3.
Prerequisite: FLG 201.

Last of four consecutive courses in German. Continued conversational practice to develop proficiency in speaking and listening. Development of advanced writing skills by refining grammatical structures and style through assignments, and of advancedreading skills through the use of cultural and literary texts from the German-speaking countries.

FLG 212 German Language, Culture, Science, and Technology 3.
Prerequisite: FLG 201.

Discussion of German, Austrian and Swiss scientific discoveries and technological inventions as well as their impact on global society, such as aspirin, x-rays, printing technology, diesel engine, computer, microchip, television, mp3 format, genetics, and environmental technologies. Also a fourth semester German course, with intensive practice to develop proficiency in intermediate speaking and listening, reading and writing, using materials from scientific and technological disciplines.

FLG 301 Advanced German 3.
Prerequisite: FLG 202 or FLG 212 or a score of 688 on the NC State placement test..

Review and consolidation of aspects of German grammar and development of writing skills. Listening and speaking practice through group activities and oral reports. Class discussions on topics from the cultures of Germany, Austria, and Switzerland, such as film, history, and the fine arts. FLG 301 and 302 can be taken in random order.

FLG 302 German Oral and Written Expression 3.
Prerequisite: FLG 202 or FLG 212 or a score of 688 on the NC State placement test..

Review and practice of spoken and written German using authentic texts and materials from contemporary Germany (short stories, films, and online media). Review of German grammar through conversation, writing, and vocabulary building exercises. Oral reports by students. FLG 301 and 302 can be taken in random order.

FLG 307 Business German 3.
Prerequisite: FLG 202 or FLG 212 or placement at 300 level through the NC State placement exam.

Business German vocabulary and terminology. Readings and discussions on current business topics. Special consideration to intercultural communication relative to international business operations.

FLG 311 Introduction to German Translation 3.
Prerequisite: FLG 202 or FLG 212 or placement at 300 level through the NC State placement exam.

Introduction to theory, methods, and techniques in translation applied to materials of various fields and professions. Emphasis on written translation.

FLG 315 Germanic Civilization and Culture 3.
Prerequisite: FLG 202 or FLG 212 or placement at 300 level through the NC State placement exam.

Culture and civilization of the German-speaking countries. Analysis of the social, economic and political structures of Germany, Austria, and Switzerland. Lectures, reports, conversation. Taught in German.

FLG 318 New German Cinema and Beyond 3.
Prerequisite: FLG 202 or FLG 212.

Survey of the major contributions to German Cinema from the 1960's to the present day. Attention to film as an artistic medium and to the cinematic representation of German history and culture. Topics covered include Nazism, German Terrorism, former East Germany, debates on the position of minorities in Germany, and German Jewish relations. Taught in German.

FLG 320 Introduction to German Literature 3.
Prerequisite: FLG 202 or FLG 212 or placement at 300 level through the NC State placement exam.

An introduction to reading and analyzing German, Austrian, and Swiss literary texts in their cultural and historical contexts. Discussion of various genres (short story, novel, drama, poetry) formal aspects, literary periods, and a variety of critical approaches. Lectures and much discussion. Oral and written assignments, exam.

FLG 323 Twentieth Century German Literature 3.
Prerequisite: FLG 202 or FLG 212 or placement at 300 level through the NC State placement exam.

Twentieth century literature from German-speaking countries. Readings of Mann, Kafka, Rilke, Hesse, Durrenmatt, Frisch, Grass, and a variety of poets.

FLG 325 German Lyric Poetry 3.
Prerequisite: FLG 202 or FLG 212 or placement at 300 level through the NC State placement exam.

A historical and interpretative study of the German lyric from the fifteenth into the twentieth century with special attention to the poet's choice of theme, the ways in which that theme is treated, and the relevance of the poem to the human experience.

FLG 390 German Studies Topics 3.
Prerequisite: FLG 202 or FLG 212 or placement at 300 level through the NC State placement exam.

Presentation of material not available in regular course offerings, or offering of new courses on a trial basis. Course may be offered through videoconferencing with other UNC campuses as an offering of the German Studies Consortium. Content determined by faculty member in consultation with the department's German section coordinator. May be repeated.

FLG 398 Independent Study in German 1-6.
Prerequisite: FLG 202 or FLG 212 or placement at 300 level through the NC State placement exam.

Individualized study in German language, culture, or literature. Topic, mode of study, and credit hours to be determined in consultation with the faculty member supervising work. Departmental approval required. Individualized/Independent Study and Research courses require a "Course Agreement for Students Enrolled in Non-Standard Courses" be completed by the student and faculty member prior to registration by the department.

FLG 401 German Graduate Reading 3.

Basic German grammar, with special attention to characteristics of formal expository style, and illustrative readings. Study of extracts from scholarly publications in students' areas of research. Prepares students to take the graduate foreign language certification exam.

FLG 420 Current Issues in German-Language Media 3.
Prerequisite: Two courses at the FLG 300 level.

Using the internet and a textbook, the course will be constructed from current topics circulated in the German, Austrian and Swiss media, e.g. newspaper websites, radio programs and TV news in streaming video format. Overview of the different news genres, the German-language media scape, and major political, economic, social and cultural issues in the German-speaking countries. Discussion, oral presentations, written assignments.

FLG 430 Cultural Artifacts in the German-Speaking Countries 3.
Prerequisite: One FLG 300-level course and one from this list: FLG 315, 316, 318, 320, 323, 325, 390..

Focuse on major cultural achievements in Germany, Austria and Switzerland, including literature, film, art, and music. Topics will vary. Examples are: "Kafka and Modernism", "German/Austrian/Swiss Literature and Film-Adaptations", "German-LanguageOpera", "German Art and Society in the 20th Century", or "The Faust Theme in Literature, Art, and Music". This course is repeatable so long as a different topic is covered each time.

FLG 440 Green Germany: Nature and Environment in German Speaking Cultures 3.
Prerequisite: 3 Hours of 300-Level German.

Survey of the long "Green" tradition in German-speaking cultures as reflected in the arts, in literature, and in scientific discoveries that have made Germany, Austria, and Switzerland leaders in development of alternative environmental technologies. Discussion in German of issues such as Romantic nature poetry, industrialization, Nazi attitudes towards nature, deforestation, the Green Party, air and water pollution, waste management, energy production, climate change, transportation systems, green architecture, sustainability, and the latest environmental technologies. Practice and assessment through class debates, group work, writing tasks, student presentations, and a portfolio.

FLG 492 Senior Seminar in German Studies 3.
Prerequisite: Two 300 level FLG courses on literature or culture or film.

Capstone seminar in German literature or culture. Student presentations and either a substantial essay or a series of essays. Topics vary each semester.

FLG 499 Internship in Germany, Austria, or German-Speaking Switzerland 1-6.
Prerequisite: Two courses at the FLG 300 level.

Professional internship in a company or organization in Germany, Austria, or German-speaking Switzerland, with German as the main language of daily operations. Contract between the student, department, and company or organization about content, scope, and requirements. 1-6 credits for an approved internship. Essay describing and evaluating the internship experience in the conext of student's professional development. Students are responsible for their own travel and living expenses. Departmental approval required. Individualized/Independent Study and Research courses require a Course Agreement for Students Enrolled in Non-Standard Courses be completed by the student and faculty member prior to registration by the department.

FLI - Foreign Language - Italian Courses

FLI 101 Elementary Italian I 3.

Begins the development of a balanced foundation in all four language skills. Concentrates on listening and speaking, emphasizing idiomatic Italian. Short readings in Italian culture and civilization. Class and laboratory practice, written homework.

FLI 102 Elementary Italian II 3.
Prerequisite: FLI 101.

Continuation of FLI 101 with emphasis on acquisition of oral skills through class practice and use of audio aids. Readings in Italian culture, civilization and literature.

FLI 201 Intermediate Italian I 3.
Prerequisite: FLI 102.

Third of four consecutive courses to develop skills of speaking, listening, reading and writing. Readings and discussion of Italian culture, civilization and literature.

FLI 202 Intermediate Italian II 3.
Prerequisite: FLI 201.

Last of four sequential language courses. Increased emphasis on reading and writing. Readings in the literature, culture, and civilization of Italy.

FLI 208 Intermediate Italian Conversation 3.
Corequisite: FLI 202.

Intensive practice in speaking and understanding Italian through role playing, discussion, interviews, and use of audio-visual materials.

FLI 308 Italian Reading and Conversation 3.
Prerequisite: FLI 202.

Advanced readings and intensive conversational practice in Italian for students beyond the intermediate level.

FLI 318 Italian Society Through Cinema 3.
Prerequisite: FLI 202.

Italian culture and society through cinema from the fascist era to the present. A study of selected films representative of major social-political, ideological, and artistic developments,. Weekly film viewings.

FLJ - Foreign Language - Japanese Courses

FLJ 101 Elementary Japanese I 3.
Corequisite: FLJ 103.

Introduction to standard, formal Japanese. Emphasis on speaking and listening skills. Exposure to Japanese culture, reading, and writing.

FLJ 102 Elementary Japanese II 3.
Prerequisite: FLJ 101, Corequisite: FLJ 104.

Continuation of basic skills. Emphasis on speaking and listening skills; inclusion of Japanese cultural factors in communication. Some reading and writing.

FLJ 103 Elementary Japanese I Conversation 1.
Corequisite: FLJ 101.

Supplements conversational practice in FLJ 101. Students are encouraged to use their speaking skills in a variety of situations. Special attention is given to correcting and improving pronunciation and intonation.

FLJ 104 Elementary Japanese II Conversation 1.
Prerequisite: FLJ 101, Corequisite: FLJ 102.

Supplements conversational practice in FLJ 102. Extensive use of speaking skills in a variety of situations. Special attention given to correcting and improving pronunciation and intonation.

FLJ 201 Intermediate Japanese I 3.
Prerequisite: FLJ 102 or FLJ 105, Corequisite: FLJ 203.

Continuation of basic skills. Greater emphasis on reading and writing. More exposure to Japanese cultural traditions.

FLJ 202 Intermediate Japanese II 3.
Prerequisite: FLJ 201, Corequisite: FLJ 204.

Continuation of the learning of the basic skills. Emphasis on reading and writing as well as on spoken Japanese and on cultural patterns of behavior.

FLJ 203 Intermediate Japanese Conversation 1.
Prerequisite: FLJ 102, Corequisite: FLJ 201, FLJ 202 or FLJ 301.

Practice in spoken Japanese through use of the language in a variety of situations. Increase vocabulary and develop fluency and ease in the structural patterns of the language.May be repeated for a maximum of three credit hours.

FLJ 204 Intermediate Japanese II Conversation 1.
Corequisite: FLJ 202.

Supplemental intermediate conversational practice. Drills and situational exercises to build oral proficiency with patterns introduced in FLJ 202.

FLJ 301 Intermediate Japanese III 3.
Prerequisite: FLJ 202.

Continued study of Japanese language. Primary emphasis on spoken Japanese, but attention also given to reading, writing and culture.

FLJ 302 Intermediate Japanese IV 3.
Prerequisite: FLJ 301.

Continued training in the foundations of Japanese language. Primary emphasis on spoken Japanese, with increased attention to reading and writing.

FLJ 342 Classical Japanese Literature in Translation 3.

A survey of literature in Japan from earliest recorded times through the sixteenth century. Examples from major eras and genres (folktales, poetry, philosophy, fictional narrative, theater, etc.) will be considered, with attention to historical and cultural contexts, as well as to contemporary scholarship and approaches toward traditional literature. Examples from literature outside Japan will be included for comparative purposes. No prior knowledge of Japanese required: Readings and discussions in English.

FLJ 344 Early Modern Japanese Literature in Translation 3.

A survey of literature in Japan from 1600 to late Nineteenth Century. Examples from major periods and genres (novels, poetry, philosophy, dram, miscellaneous narrative, etc.) will be considered, with attention to historical and cultural contexts, as well as to contemporary scholarship and approaches toward the literature. Examples from literature outside Japan will be included for comparative purposed. No prior knowledge of Japanese required: Readings and discussions in English.

FLJ 345 Modern Japanese Literature in Translation 3.

A survey in literature in Japan from the Meiji Era through World War Two. Examples from major periods and genres (novels, poetry, philosophy, drama, miscellaneous narrative, etc.) will be considered, with attention to historical and cultural contexts, as well as to contemporary scholarship and approaches toward the literature. Examples from literature outside Japan will be included for comparative purposes. No prior knowledge of Japanese required: Readings and discussions in English.

FLJ 351 Contemporary Culture in Japan 3.
Prerequisite: FLJ 101.

Introduction to basic aspects of cultural practices in Japanese society, including education, work life, family relationships, everyday religious practices, aesthetic traditions, national identity, and gender. Students will develop an understanding of the interrelationships between language and culture.

FLJ 401 Advanced Japanese I 3.
Prerequisite: FLJ 302.

Continued training in the foundations of Japanese language, with emphasis on complex verb forms. Increased attention to reading and writing.

FLJ 402 Advanced Japanese II 3.
Prerequisite: FLJ 401.

Elaboration on grammatical forms learned in the previous courses with applications in reading and writing, combined with more sophisticated vocabulary and idioms and attention to development of natural reading skills.

FLN - Foreign Language - Hindi Courses

FLN 101 Elementary Hindi-Urdu I 3.
Corequisite: FLN 103.

Introduction to standard Hindi-Urdu. Emphasis on speaking and listening, and on reading and writing in the Hindi writing system (Devanagari). Readings in South Asian culture and civilization.

FLN 102 Elementary Hindi-Urdu II 3.
Prerequisite: FLN 101, Corequisite: FLN 104.

Continuation of FLN 101. Emphasis on oral communication and reading and writing in the Hindi writing system (Devanagari). Further readings in South Asian culture and civilization.

FLN 103 Elementary Hindi-Urdu I Conversation 1.
Corequisite: FLN 101.

Required conversational practice for FLN 101. Special attention to individual pronunciation and intonation. Introduction of formal and informal speech. Use of audiovisual materials.

FLN 104 Elementary Hindi-Urdu II Conversation 1.
Prerequisite: FLN 101, Corequisite: FLN 102.

Required conversational practice for FLN 102. Extensive use of speaking skills in variety of situations. Attention to supplemental non-verbal communication. Use of audiovisual materials.

FLN 201 Intermediate Hindi-Urdu I 3.
Prerequisite: FLN 102, Corequisite: FLN 203.

Continuation of basic language skills. Further practice of Urdu/Hindi writing systems. Introduction to grammatical divergence of Hindi and Urdu. Readings in South Asian culture and civilization.

FLN 202 Intermediate Hindi-Urdu II 3.
Prerequisite: FLN 201, Corequisite: FLN 204.

Continuation of FLN 201. Further practice of both Hindi/Urdu writing systems. Further distinction of spoken and literary Urdu and Hindi. Further readings in South Asian culture and civilization.

FLN 203 Intermediate Hindi-Urdu I Conversation 1.
Prerequisite: FLN 102, Corequisite: FLN 201.

Required conversational practice for FLN 201. Advancement of speaking skills through role playing, interviews, debates. Further Hindi and Urdu non-verbal communication. Use of audiovisual materials, including responses to commercial television and movies.

FLN 204 Intermediate Hindi-Urdu II Conversation 1.
Prerequisite: FLN 201, Corequisite: FLN 202.

Required conversational practice for FLN 202. Refinement of speaking skills through role playing, interviews, debates. Further Hindi and Urdu non-verbal communication. Use of audiovisual materials, including responses to commercial television andmovies.

FLN 301 Twentieth Century Hindi & Urdu Fiction 3.
Prerequisite: FLN 202.

Introduces advanced Hindi-Urdu students to the prose fiction of major Hindi and Urdu literary figures including Munshi Premchand, Saadat Hasa Manto and others. Texts will be provided in both Hindi and Urdu scripts and/or English translation as available.

FLN 302 Modern Hindi & Urdu Poetry 3.
Prerequisite: FLN 301.

Introduces advanced Hindi-Urdu students to representative works of 19th and 20th century Hindi and Urdu poets and poetic forms. Texts will be provided in both Hindi and Urdu scripts and/or English translation as available.

FLN 401 Hindi Literature and South Asian Cultural Contexts 3.

Selected topics in Hindi literature and/or South Asian literature in Hindi, such as drama in modern South Asia, the twentieth-century novel, literature and the nation, narratives of pain and resistance, gender and social reform. Readings and discussion in Hindi, with emphasis on the examination of formal literary characteristics and the interconnections of texts and relevant South Asian cultural contexts. Topics will be rotated so that students can take this course for credit up to three times.

FLP - Foreign Language - Portuguese Courses

FLP 101 Elementary Portuguese I 3.

Introduction to the fundamentals of Brazilian Portuguese: pronunciation, comprehension, and spoken syntax and grammar.

FLP 102 Elementary Portuguese II 3.
Prerequisite: FLP 101.

Continuation of the essentials of Brazilian Portuguese. Further stress on pronunciation and comprehension and introduction of reading and writing skills.

FLP 201 Intermediate Portuguese I 3.
Prerequisite: FLP 102 or placement in course.

The third level of Portuguese with special attention to speaking, reading, writing and developing a cultural awareness of the cultural heritage of the Portuguese-speaking peoples of Portugal, Brazil and Portuguese-speaking Africa.

FLP 401 Brazilian Portuguese for Spanish Speakers 3.
Prerequisite: Native/Heritage Spanish Speaker or FLS 202 or Equivalent and Instructor's Approval.

A one semester on-line intensive introductory course to Brazilian Portuguese for Spanish speakers taught in Spanish focusing on the development of: 1) Reading Comprehension in Brazilian Portuguese; 2) Basic translation skills: Spanish>Portuguese>Spanish; 3) Colloquial writing skills in Brazilian Portuguese; 4) Basic speaking ability in Brazilian Portuguese. This course is open to undergraduate, graduate and extension students with a formal knowledge of Spanish who fulfill the prerequisite. Instructor approval required.

FLR - Foreign Language - Russian Courses

FLR 101 Elementary Russian I 3.

First in a four-course sequence to develop language skills in Russian. Oral and written practice in the classroom and language laboratory and attention to Russian cultural heritage.

FLR 102 Elementary Russian II 3.
Prerequisite: FLR 101.

Emphasis on acquisition of basic oral skills, with complementary reading and writing exercises and attention to Russian cultural heritage.

FLR 201 Intermediate Russian I 3.
Prerequisite: FLR 102.

Basic Russian language skills continued. More emphasis given to writing and essential conversational practice. Intermediate level readings in Russian literature and culture. Class and laboratory practice; written assignments.

FLR 202 Intermediate Russian II 3.
Prerequisite: FLR 201.

Advanced aspects of Russian syntax through study of text. Continued attention to conversational practice and vocabulary building.

FLR 303 Russian Literature in Translation: The Nineteenth Century 3.

A study of the great Russian writers of the nineteenth century. Examination of peculiarly Russian as well as the universal aspects of this literature. All readings, lectures and discussions in English.

FLR 304 Russian Literature in Translation: The Twentieth Century 3.

A study of major Russian writers of the twentieth century. Examination of peculiarly Russian as well as the universal aspects of this literature. All readings, lectures and discussions in English.

FLR 318 Russian Cinema and Society 3.

Russian culture and society through cinema. A study of selected films representative of major social-political, ideological, and artistic developments. Weekly film screenings. No knowledge of Russian required.

FLS - Foreign Language - Spanish Courses

FLS 101 Elementary Spanish I 3.

For students with little or no background or previous study of Spanish or those who place into course via Spanish placement exam. Development of communicative abilities within an integrated skill approach (speaking, listening, reading, writing). Introduction to the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world. Includes written and oral assignments of language structures and vocabulary. Conducted entirely in Spanish. Closed to native speakers of Spanish.

FLS 102 Elementary Spanish II 3.
Prerequisite: FLS 101.

Continuation of FLS 101. Development of communicative abilities within an integrated skills approach (speaking, listening, reading, writing). Introduction to the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world. Includes written and oral assignments of language structures and vocabulary. Conducted entirely in Spanish. Closed to native speakers of Spanish.

FLS 105 Intensive Elementary Spanish 6.

An intensive course equivalent to FLS 101 plus FLS 102. Development of communicative abilities within an integrated skills approach (speaking, listening, reading, writing). Introduction to the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world. Includes written and oral assignments of language structures and vocabulary. Conducted entirely in Spanish. Closed to native speakers of Spanish.

FLS 110 Accelerated Elementary Spanish 3.
Prerequisite: A score of 167 or better on the Spanish placement exam is required for matriculation in this course.

Contents of FLS 101 and FLS 102 at an accelerated pace, for students placed into the course based on results of the Spanish placement test. Development of communicative abilities within an integrated skills approach (speaking, listening, reading, writing). Introduction to the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world. Includes extensive written and oral assignments of language structures and vocabulary. Conducted entirely in Spanish. Closed to native speakers of Spanish.

FLS 201 Intermediate Spanish I 3.
Prerequisite: FLS 102,105 or 110.

Continued development of communicative abilities for students with previous study of elementary level Spanish. Integrated skills approach (speaking, listening, reading, writing). Students will learn to function in everyday situations, expressing opinions and doubts, and narrating and describing in present, past, and future time, and will explore cultural issues through literary and other types of readings. Includes written and oral assignments of language structures and vocabulary. Conducted entirely in Spanish. Closed to native speakers of Spanish.

FLS 202 Intermediate Spanish II 3.
Prerequisite: FLS 201 or FLS 212.

Development of communicative abilities at the intermediate level of the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Language proficiency scale, with an integrated skills approach (reading, writing, speaking, listening) and additional emphasis on knowledge and competence in the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world. Includes written and oral assignments of language structures and vocabulary. Conducted entirely in Spanish. Closed to native speakers of Spanish.

FLS 212 Spanish: Language, Technology, Culture 3.
Prerequisite: FLS 102 or FLS 110 or FLS 105.

A study of the language structures and vocabulary necessary for an intermediate level of communication in Spanish together with cultural and technical issues of our global society in the context of the Spanish-speaking world. Fulfills the FLS 201 requirement.

FLS 295 Intermediate Special Topics in Spanish 3.
Prerequisite: FLS 201.

Special Topics in language and cultures of the Spanish speaking world for students at the intermediate (200) level. Includes courses taught in Spanish study abroad programs. Course may be taken up to three times.

FLS 331 Spanish Oral and Written Expression I 3.
Prerequisite: FLS 202.

Development of speaking and writing skills at the Intermediate Mid to Intermediate High levels of the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages proficiency scale, as well as listening/viewing and reading skills. Focus on sentence and paragraph-length discourse, narration and description in present, past, and future time frames within a variety of topics and contexts, and communication skills such as circumlocution. Course readings, video and discussion content center upon culturalaspects of the Spanish speaking world.

FLS 332 Spanish Oral and Written Expression II 3.
Prerequisite: FLS 202.

Development of speaking and writing skills at the Intermediate High levels of the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages proficiency scale, as well as listening/viewing and reading skills. Focus on paragraph-length discourse, narration and detailed description in present, past, and future time frames within a variety of topics and contexts, and communication skills such as circumlocution. Course readings, video and discussion content center upon cultural aspects of the Spanish speaking world.

FLS 333 The Sounds of Spanish 3.
Prerequisite: FLS 202.

A study of the pronunciation and phonological system of Spanish, with the goals of improving student pronunciation and analyzing native Spanish pronunciation. Extensive practice in phonetic transcription and pronunciation, as well as phonetic/phonological dialect variation.

FLS 335 Spanish for Native and Heritage Speakers 3.
Native or heritage speaker of Spanish with Advanced or Superior proficiency on the ACTFL Oral Proficiency Scale.

This course is designed to meet the needs of native and heritage speakers of Spanish whose linguistic level is above that of our 200-level courses. Development of oral and writing skills at the Advanced-Mid through Superior levels of the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages proficiency scale.

FLS 336 Spanish for Business 3.
P: FLS 331 or FLS 335.

Business Spanish vocabulary and terminology. Emphasis on everyday spoken and written Spanish. Readings and discussions of business topics. Cross-cultural considerations relative to international business operations.

FLS 337 Spanish for Tourism in the Hispanic World 3.
Prerequisite: FLS 202.

Exploration of the tourism industry in the Spanish speaking world from cultural-historical, geographic, and linguistic perspectives. Course can lead to Tourism Certificate in Spanish from the Chamber of Commerce and Industry of Spain.

FLS 340 Introduction to Hispanic Literatures and Cultures 3.
Prerequisite: FLS 331 or FLS 332 or FLS 335.

Exploration of what literature is; what it means to read literature; and why one might be interested in analyzing literature. Introduction to literary terminology, as well as literary genres and movements in the Spanish language. Examination of social-cultural-historical contexts of Spain and Latin America, particularly matters of race, class, gender, and political ideas as they relate to literatures of the Spanish speaking world. Interpretation and analysis of literary texts, cultural institutions, and objects of national, mass, and popular cultures.

FLS 341 Literature and Culture of Spain I 3.
Prerequisite: FLS 331 or FLS 332 or FLS 335.

Survey of literary and cultural contexts of medieval and early modern Spain (12th to 17th centuries). Examination of literary genres in connection with concurrent cultural and historical events. Exploration of literature as a reflection of the experiences and events meaningful to Spanish society during this time period. Emphasis on the ways in which literature and other cultural artifacts give voice to value systems, traditions, and beliefs.

FLS 342 Literature and Culture of Spain II 3.
Prerequisite: FLS 331 or FLS 332 or FLS 335.

Survey of literary and cultural contexts of 18th and 19th century Spain. Examination of literary genres in connection with concurrent cultural and historical events. Exploration of literature as a reflection of the experiences and events meaningful to Spanish society during this time period. Emphasis on the ways in which literature and other cultural artifacts give voice to value systems, traditions, and beliefs.

FLS 343 Literature and Culture of Spain III 3.
Prerequisite: FLS 331 or FLS 332 or FLS 335.

Survey of literary and cultural contexts of 20th and 21st century Spain. Examination of literary genres in connection with concurrent cultural and historical events. Exploration of literature as a reflection of the experiences and events meaningful to Spanish society during this time period. Emphasis on the ways in which literature and other cultural artifacts give voice to value systems, traditions, and beliefs.

FLS 351 Literature and Culture of Latin America I 3.
Prerequisite: FLS 331 or FLS 332 or FLS 335.

Survey of literary and cultural contexts of Latin America from the pre-conquest, colonial and early-independence periods (15th to mid 19th centuries). Examination of literary genres in connection with concurrent cultural and historical events. Exploration of literature as a reflection of the experiences and events meaningful to Latin American society during this time period. Emphasis on the ways in which literature and other cultural artifacts give voice to value systems, traditions, and beliefs.

FLS 352 Literature and Culture of Latin America II 3.
Prerequisite: FLS 331 or FLS 332 or FLS 335.

Survey of literary and cultural contexts of Latin America from the Mid 19th to the Mid 20th centuries. Examination of literary genres in connection with concurrent cultural and historical events. Exploration of literature as a reflection of the experiences and events meaningful to Latin American society during this time period. Emphasis on the ways in which literature and other cultural artifacts give voice to value systems, traditions, and beliefs.

FLS 353 Literature and Culture of Latin America III 3.
Prerequisite: FLS 331 or FLS 332 or FLS 335.

Survey of literary and cultural contexts of Latin America since 1960. Examination of literary genres in connection with concurrent cultural and historical events. Exploration of literature as a reflection of the experiences and events meaningful to Latin American society during this time period. Emphasis on the ways in which literature and other cultural artifacts give voice to value systems, traditions, and beliefs.

FLS 360 Hispanic Cinema 3.
Prerequisite: FLS 331 or FLS 332 or FLS 335.

Survey of the major contributions of Hispanic cinema from its origins to the present. Analysis of film as an artistic medium and as the cinematic representation of Hispanic histories and cultures. Reading, discussions, and viewing of films by representative directors.

FLS 395 Special Topics in Spanish 3.
Prerequisite: FLS 202.

Special Topics in language and cultures of the Spanish speaking world for students at the 300 level. Includes courses taught in Spanish study abroad programs. Course may be taken up to three times.

FLS 399 Intensive Spanish Oral Proficiency Workshop 1.
Prerequisite: 3 Hours of 300-level Spanish.

Extensive conversation centered upon the communicative functions of the intermediate high to advanced levels of the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) Oral Proficiency Scale. Assignments will include listening/viewing and speaking tasks to support in class activities. Designed to help Spanish majors to achieve the intermediate high oral proficiency level required for graduation. This is a 5-week course. Departmental permission is required.

FLS 400 Methods and Techniques in Spanish Translation and Interpretation 3.
Prerequisite: 12 credits of 300 level Spanish.

Study and practical application of theory, methods and techniques of translation based on materials relevant to various fields and professions.

FLS 401 Spanish Graduate Reading 3.

Basic Spanish grammar, with special attention to characteristics of formal expository style, and illustrative readings. Study of extracts from scholarly publications in students' areas of research. Prepares students to take the graduate foreign language certification exam.

FLS 402 Introduction to Spanish Linguistics 3.
Prerequisite: 12 credits of 300 level Spanish.

Introduction to fundamental terminology and concepts in the study of linguistics. Overview of the Spanish phonetics and phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics, sociolinguistics and historical linguistics.

FLS 405 Spanish-English Comparative Grammar 3.
Prerequisite: 12 credits of 300 level Spanish.

Analysis of the linguistic and grammatical structure (phonology, morphology, syntax, and discourse) of English and Spanish in order to develop a deeper understanding of how both linguistic systems function in similar and different ways.

FLS 411 Topics in the Culture of Spain 3.
Prerequisite: 12 credits of 300-level Spanish.

Exploration of particular themes related to the culture of Spain, with culture broadly defined as history, social and political aspects of society, as well as human and artistic expression including use of language, literary production, performance,print, and electronic media. Themes in this course expand upon those introduced in the 300 level of the Spanish curriculum. Class discussion and assignments require greater depth and sophistication than introduction to literature and culture courses of the 300 level.

FLS 412 Topics in the Culture of Latin America and the Caribbean 3.
Prerequisite: 12 credits of 300-level Spanish.

Exploration of particular themes related to the culture of Latin America and the Caribbean, with culture broadly defined as history, social and political aspects of society, as well as human and artistic expression including use of language, literary production, performance, print, and electronic media. Themes in this course expand upon those introduced in the 300 level of the Spanish curriculum. Class discussion and assignments require greater depth and sophistication than introduction to literature and culture courses of the 300 level.

FLS 413 Spain and the Americas in Transatlantic Perspective 3.
Prerequisite: 12 credits of 300-level Spanish.

Exploration of key moments of communication, exchange and conflict between the different parts of the Spanish speaking world, from the point of contact between imperial Spain and the indigenous civilizations of the "New World". Examination of the commonalities and distinctions of the quest for independence, modernity and democracy. Analysis of immigration across national frontiers in the present day Hispanic World and greater American continent.

FLS 492 Seminar in Hispanic Studies 3.
Prerequisite: 12 credits of 300 level Spanish.

Advanced seminar on a specific area of Hispanic studies (topics vary), leading to a major term paper and/or a series of essays by the student.

FLS 495 Advanced Special Topics in Spanish 3.
Prerequisite: 12 credits of 300-level Spanish.

Advanced special topics in language and cultures of the Spanish speaking world for students at the 400 level. Includes courses taught in Spanish study abroad programs. Course may be taken up to three times.

FLS 502 Linguistic Structure of Spanish 3.

Introduction to fundamental terminology and concepts in the study of linguistics. Overview of the Spanish sound system (phonology), principles of word formation such as derivation and inflection (morphology), structure and grammatical relations of phrases and sentences (syntax), as well as the relationship between linguistic levels. Graduate standing required.

FLS 503 Spanish Applied Linguistics 3.
Prerequisite: FLS 502 (Linguistic Structure of Spanish).

Overview of prominent theoretical perspectives in the acquisition of Spanish as a second language. Application of theory to the learning and teaching of the Spanish language. Analysis of issues in the acquisition of Spanish phonology, morphosyntax, semantics, and pragmatics. Graduate standing required.

FLS 504 Spanish Language Change and Variation 3.
Prerequisite: FLS 502 (Linguistic Structure of Spanish).

Overview of phonological and morphosyntactic change from Latin to modern Spanish. Linguistic exploration of social and geographical dimensions Spanish language variation. Examination of issues of Spanish/English contact in the United States, including bilingualism and bilingual education. Graduate standing required.

FLS 509 Spanish Phonetics and Phonology 3.
Prerequisite: FLS 502 (Linguistic Structure of Spanish).

A theoretical introduction to the phonetics and phonological system of Spanish. Topics covered include articulatory phonetics, narrow and broad transcription, and the analysis of linguistic data with the goal of understanding the underlying system of Spanish sounds. Current topics in Spanish phonology are included. Graduate standing required.

FLS 515 History of Spanish Language 3.
Prerequisite: FLS 502 or equivalent; or permission of instructor.

Overview of historical evolution of modern Spanish from spoken Latin. Focus on theories of language change as applied to the historical development of Spanish. Graduate status or instructor permission required.

FLS 528 Don Quixote 3.

This course studies the historical and political contexts of Cervante's writing, his place in Renaissance culture, and the role of Don Quixote in the formation of the modern novel. Taught in Spanish. Graduate status or permission of the instructor.

FLS 530 The Cultural Production of Spanish Democracy 3.

Challenges, contradictions, accomplishments, and shortcomings in the political, social, economic, cultural, and literary dimensions of Spain in the last quarter of the 20th century. Treatment of literary texts, historical and journalistic documents, critical and theoretical essays, as well as fiction and non-fiction films, music, and other products of popular and mass culture since 1975. Particular attention to significant cultural events such as the 1992 Barcelona Olympics, and the celebration of the 500th anniversary of the "Discovery" of America. Must hold graduate standing.

FLS 553 The Latin American Avant-Garde 3.

An in-depth analysis of the cultural avant-garde in Latin America at the beginning of the twentieth century (1905-1939). Students will study European and Latin American theories of the avant-garde, literature, art, music, and manifestation from the period in several Latin American countries.Graduate standing required. Taught in Spanish.

FLS 554 The Sixties in Latin America 3.

An in-depth analysis of the cultural production during the 60s in Latin America. Students will study novels, short stories, poetry, music, and film from several Latin American countries. Graduate standing required.

FLS 563 The Latin American Novel 3.

The course offers a comprehensive view of Latin America novel (from the 19th Century until the present). It centers its attention foremost on canonical works (Isaacs, Gallegos, Vargas Llosa, Puig, etc.). Besides familiarizing students with the political, social and cultural contexts that gave rise to these texts, it also provides, through the reading of various theoretical articles, a basic introduction to narrative theory (Genette, Booth, Bal, Brooks, etc.). Graduate standing required.

FLS 592 Seminar in Hispanic Studies 3.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Hispanic Studies;M.A. students in Hispanic Studies.

Advanced seminar on a specific area of Hispanic studies (topics vary), leading to a major term paper and/or a series of essays by the student.

FLS 595 Special Topics in Spanish 1-3.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing or Permission of the Instructor.

In depth exploration of specialized topics in Spanish literature, culture or language. Also used to test and develop new courses.Course taught in Spanish.

FLS 630 Independent Study in Spanish 1-3.

Individualized study in Spanish language or literature at the graduate level. Topic and mode of study to be determined in consultation with the faculty member supervising work.

FLS 675 Special Project in Spanish 1-3.
Prerequisite: Student must be in final semester of his or her program.

Individual project in Spanish language or literature at the graduate level. Topic and mode of study to be determined in consultation with student's project advisory committee within the parameters of specific options.

FLS 688 Non-Thesis Masters Continuous Registration - Half Time Registration 1.
Prerequisite: Master's student.

For students in non-thesis master's programs who have completed all credit hour requirements for their degree but need to maintain half-time continuous registration to complete incomplete grades, projects, final master's exam, etc.

GRK - Foreign Language - Greek Courses

GRK 101 Elementary Greek I 3.

Introduction to Classical Greek. Greek alphabet, basic grammar and syntax. Readings based on Greek mythology, philosophy, and literature.

GRK 102 Elementary Greek II 3.
Prerequisite: GRK 101.

A second course in Classical Greek, continuing and expanding the work of GRK 101, and completing the study of grammar. Readings from major authors including Herodotus, Thucydides, and Xenophon.

GRK 201 Intermediate Greek I 3.
Prerequisite: GRK 102.

Introduction to Greek prose. Emphasis upon improvement of reading skill through vocabulary acquisition and study of complex grammar. Introduction to Attic dialect through reading Plato, and Koine Greek through reading the New Testament. Examination of the importance of these works to Western literature and culture.

GRK 202 Intermediate Greek II 3.
Prerequisite: GRK 201.

Reading in Homer's Iliad and the New Testament. Techniques of oral poetry. Study of the use of myth, and of the literary and historical significance of the Iliad. Analysis of differences between classical and Koine Greek in the New Testament.

GRK 399 Directed Readings in Greek 3.
Prerequisite:GRK 202.

Advanced Greek language course introducing students to research methods in classical studies. Readings may include Plato, Homer, Sophocles, New Testament, or others. May be taken up to two times with different readings for credit.

LAT - Foreign Language - Latin Courses

LAT 101 Elementary Latin I 3.

Beginning course in Classical Latin, emphasizing elementary grammatical form and basic syntax. Readings based on brief selections from Roman authors, including Cicero and Catullus.

LAT 102 Elementary Latin II 3.

Continuation of Latin 101. Completion of the study of elementary grammar. Readings from a variety of Latin authors, including texts on mythological themes.

LAT 201 Intermediate Latin I 3.
Prerequisite: LAT 102.

Introduction to Latin prose and poetry. Emphasis on increased reading skill. Review of grammar fundamentals and exposure to new and more complex syntax. Examination of cultural significance of readings.

LAT 202 Intermediate Latin II 3.
Prerequisite: LAT 201.

Lyric poetry of Catullus and Horace emphasizing vocabulary, syntax, and techniques of Latin verse. Traditions and the evolution of lyric poetry and the social role of the Roman poet.

LAT 399 Directed Readings in Latin 3.
Prerequisite:LAT 202.

Advanced Latin language course introducing students to research methods in classical studies. Readings may include Vergil, Ovid, Livy, Cicero, or others. May be taken up to two times with different readings for credit.