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Department of Social Work

The Department of Social Work offers the Bachelor of Social Work (BSW) degree, which is accredited by the Council on Social Work Education. Students complete a curriculum based on the liberal arts that incorporates a professional foundation, including social work practice, human behavior and diversity, community social services, social policy, and research methods. Optional courses offer opportunities to study in depth various social work practice areas such as child welfare, aging, health care, addiction recovery, African American families, school social work, people who are homeless, soldiers/veterans/families, and a 7-week study abroad program in Guatemala. Students complete three 40-hour pre-professional placements and a 420-hour field placement in a social service setting. A minor in Social Work is available; an MSW (Master of Social Work) degree is available.

The mission of the Department of Social Work is to prepare students for entry-level generalist professional practice with diverse populations in urban and rural areas of North Carolina. The program uses a framework that advances cultural respect, human rights, and social and economic justice and contributes to the empowerment of individuals, families, groups, and communities that experience oppression and discrimination. The program also prepares students for advanced graduate-level academic work. The curriculum is a liberal arts base that includes English, literature, history, natural science, math and statistics, foreign language, philosophy, social sciences, physical education, diversity, global perspectives, interdisciplinary perspectives, and free electives. Forty-three hours of core social work courses and 3 hours of social work electives complete the 121 hour graduation requirement. Enrollment in practice and field classes is limited to social work majors, and no credit towards the social work degree is given for student life experiences.

Specific curriculum requirements are available on the Registration and Records website.

Opportunities

Social work is an exciting, challenging, and dynamic profession. No matter what the political climate or the changing nature of personal or social need, social workers will be in demand. The BSW Program provides students with the knowledgeable, values, and skills to respond competently to:

  1. The aspirations and service needs of diverse client populations
  2. The contexts that shape the needs of clients and service delivery systems throughout the state.

Social workers are employed in a variety of settings which include health care, mental health, services to the aging, child welfare, public welfare, addictions recovery, public schools, developmental disabilities, and many other public and private settings. In each of these areas there is recognition for professional preparation, and the BSW graduate will be prepared to embark upon a career in his or her chosen field. All states, including North Carolina, have licensing or certification procedures for social work practice. Graduation from the Department of Social Work makes the student eligible for such licensing or certification.

Minor in Social Work

The minor is designed to familiarize students with the social service system, major social welfare programs, and elements of the profession of social work. The student takes four required courses and selects one additional course from elective offerings, which represent the contribution of professional social work in a number of settings.

Student Organizations

Baccalaureate Student Social Work Association (BSSWA) is open to all majors and gives students the chance to interact with other Social Work majors and practitioners in the community to share concerns and ideas and to undertake fund-raising and service projects for the community. It is an organization run by students and aims to help students enhance professional development and promote human dignity.

Phi Alpha Honor Society is national honor society for social work students. A BSW student is eligible for membership after achieving national and local chapter requirements which include having sophomore status, achieving a 3.0 overall grade point average and a 3.25 grade point average in required social work courses,  successfully completing the application to the professional sequence , and completing 9 hours of social work courses.

Application to the Professional Sequence

The social work faculty is committed to helping all students evaluate career goals and objectives to ensure that the students meet minimum academic standards; have goals and objectives compatible with the major; and know specifically what the profession of social work is in terms of its philosophy, value base, and fields of practice. Once students are admitted to the BSW Program, either through admission to the university or internal/external transfer, the students complete the application to the professional sequence. The application to the professional sequence process  is intended to strengthen the student’s certainty regarding career choice and to enhance the student’s focus and sense of purpose in curriculum planning. Specific components of the  application process include:

SW 201Community Social Services4
SW 290The Development of Social Welfare and Social Work in the U.S.3
SW 307Social Welfare Policy: Analysis and Advocacy3
SW 310Human Behavior Theory for Social Work Practice3
SW 312Multicultural Social Work3
  1. Applicant must be a current social work major;
  2. Completion with a grade of B- or better in two of the following courses:
     
  3. Completion of the application to the professional sequence
  4. Completion of a personal interview with the Department Student Review Committee if requested. The Department of Social Work Student Handbook spells out further details of this procedure, as well as other elements of the department.

Child Welfare Education Collaborative

The NC Child Welfare Education Collaborative strengthens public child welfare services in the state by increasing the number and diversity of well trained and highly committed BSWs and MSWs working in local Departments of Social Services. Any BSW student interested in a course of study leading to employment and leadership in public child welfare is eligible to apply for the program. Candidates for the $3400 /semester service awards (provided during the student’s last two semesters) must have completed the application to the professional sequence  and agree to work in child welfare in a county Department of Social Services in North Carolina for up to 1year following graduation. Further information about the Collaborative Program is available online.

Interim Head

K. Bullock


Graduate Program Director

J. Taliaferro


Undergraduate Program Director

To Be Announced


BSW Field Director

To Be Announced


MSW Field Director

J. Hall


BSW Advising Coordinator

To Be Announced


Professors

K. Bullock

J. Pennell


Associate Professor

N. Ames

W. Casstevens

M. Leach

J. Taliaferro


Assistant Professor

M. Fisher-Borne

J. Hall


Clinical Assistant Professor

B. Zelter


Child Welfare Education Collaborative Coordinator

J. Hall

SW - Social Work Courses

SW 201 Community Social Services 4.

This course, the basis for all other social work courses, provides an introduction to generalist practice and an overview of social work practice in a variety of settings. Successful completion of this course is a prerequisite for all advanced SW courses. This course is designed to acquaint students with social services typical of most American communities: what they are, who uses them, their impact, who pays for them, and who works in them. 40-hour pre-professional placement required, intern liability insurance required. Transportation to and from agency and/or community settings is the responsibility of the student.

SW 260 Introduction to Gerontology: An Interdisciplinary Field of Practice 3.

An integrative seminar in introducing students to gerontology as an interdisciplinary field of practice. The course provides an overview of topics such as the demography of older adults and the physical, cognitive, and psychosocial aspects of aging. The course also covers health care and social policies that impact older persons and caregivers along with the aging network of services. Students will discuss forms of oppression such as ageism, sexism, racism, able-body(ism), and homophobia that impacts work with older people as well as strategies to promote social and economic justice.

SW 290 The Development of Social Welfare and Social Work in the U.S. 3.

This course reviews the major policy and program developments in American social welfare and the emergence and development of professional social work. Emphasis will be on the socio-cultural context of policy and programs, and the ideas and ideals that shape social welfare. In addition, the basic elements of social policy development will be considered. This course provides the history, mission, philosophy, and evolution of social welfare policies and services that form the foundation of social welfare, particularly as they relate to poverty, racism, and efforts to address the needs of oppressed and marginalized populations.

SW 300 Research Methods in Social Work 3.
P: ST 311; R: Social Work Majors/Minors.

Course provides an overview of the principles and methods of basic social work research. Substantive research knowledge, quantitative and qualitative research methodology are highlighted. Research ethics within the context of social work purposes and values are emphasized. Course exposes students to how high quality research in social work is designed and conducted and how it can assist in making important decisions about the design and implementation of projects, programs, and policies that address the social needs of diverse groups.

SW 307 Social Welfare Policy: Analysis and Advocacy 3.
Prerequisite: SW 290.

Course enables students to understand the processes by which social welfare policies are developed and implemented as well as the ways in which people can intervene to affect these processes. Students have the opportunity to review recent developments in national and state social welfare policies and programs in major areas such as poverty, welfare, social security , housing, health and mental health care, and child welfare. The course focuses on the development of students' policy analysis and advocacy skills.

SW 310 Human Behavior Theory for Social Work Practice 3.
Prerequisite: SW 201.

Designed to introduce theory regarding human life/development for students intending to practice social work. Students learn to recognize ways in which diversity characterizes and shapes the human experience and is critical to the formation of identity, the extent to which a culture's structures and values may oppress, marginalize, alienate, create or enhance privilege and power. Course surveys major theoretical frameworks and normative developmental variations. Students learn to apply these theories and knowledge from the liberal arts to understand biological, psychological, social, cultural, and spiritual development. Transportation to and from agency and/or community setting is the responsibility of the student.

SW 312 Multicultural Social Work 3.

Course prepares students to work with diverse groups of people locally and globally defined by gender, ethnicity, race, national origin, sexual orientation, income, physical and mental ability, age and religion. Emphasis is placed on defining and developing skills for culturally competent social work generalist practice with these populations through students' self-examination, experiential learning, and critical reading of class material. This course helps students develop competencies in critical self-reflection, multicultural values and ethics, knowledge, awareness and skills in a variety of ways so that they can work against manifestations of social injustice. Students are expected to provide their own transportation as needed.

SW 320 Social Work Practice I 4.
Corequisite: Social Work Majors, and a prerequisite or corequisite of SW 310.

First of a three-course sequence. Practice I presents the generalist social work practice method and focuses on interviewing skills, engaging clients in the helping process, and integrating theory and social work practice. It addresses ethical and professional standards and emphasizes understanding and applying systems and ecological frameworks to practice situations. It examines strengths-based assessment, the phases of the helping relationship, and the dynamics of change in interpersonal helping relationships, within a framework of human rights, social justice, and diversity. 40-hour preprofessional placement required; intern liability insurance required. Transportation to and from agency and/or community settings is the student's responsibility.

SW 405 Social Work Practice II 4.
Prerequisite: Social Work Majors, SW 320, Corequisite: SW 480/SW 408.

Second of a three-course sequence (Practice I, II, and III). Practice II examines generalist social work roles and techniques with families and groups. Building on the foundation interviewing and engagement skills presented in Practice I, it focuses on assessment, planning, and intervention with individuals, families and small groups within a framework of human rights, social justice, and diversity. 40-hour preprofessional placement is required, intern liability insurance is required. Transportation to and from agency and/or community settings is the student's responsibility.

SW 408 Social Work Practice III 3.
Prerequisite: Social Work Majors, SW 320, Corequisite: SW 405, SW 480.

Course prepares students for practice will organizations, communities, policy structures, and institutions that are viewed as both tools and targets for change efforts. Course emphasizes multiculturalism, diversity, and social justice in relation to social systems. It is designed to provide social work practitioners with the means to help organizations and communities empower themselves to make change through networking, political participation, leadership development, mobilization, utilization of resources, and other strategies and techniques. Transportation to and/or from community settings is the responsibility of the student.

SW 412 Social Work in Schools 3.
Prerequisite: Nine credits in Social Work courses, including SW 320.

Models and roles relevant to school social work practice. Cooperative work with school personnel in the identification, prevention and treatment of social, emotional and behavioral problems of children and interventive techniques with parents and community groups. For individuals preparing for social work practice in the public schools and for school social workers seeking licensure.

SW 413 African American Families: History, Tradition, and Community 3.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

Characteristics, traditions, history and strengths of African American families and their relationship to other social institutions, social advocacy and social policy development. African-centered worldview and relevant theory pertaining to best practice with African American families.

SW 415 Child Welfare 3.
Prerequisite: SW 201.

Generalist perspective on the practice of public child welfare. History of child welfare, practices in child welfare, and current trends in child welfare programs. Skills needed to practice in child protective services, adoption, and foster care with specific attention to the North Carolina child welfare system. Application of cultural diversity and cultural competency integrated throughout as it relates to child welfare issues.

SW 416 Addiction Recovery and Social Work Practice 3.
Prerequisite: SW 310.

Knowledge and skills in identifying Alcohol and Other Drugs (AOD) problems, screening, assessment, intervention, referral, and prevention: history of AOD problems and treatment, AOD classification, effects and signs/symptoms of AOD, models of addiction, diversity, assessment, diagnosis, intervention, treatment modalities, mutual-help groups, family dynamics, prevention, and ethical considerations. Students cannot receive credit for both SW 416 and SW 516.

SW 417 Direct Practice with Older Adults 3.

Physical, psychological, social, and cultural theories of the aging process as it relates to social work practice, social policy, and services for working with older adults and their families. Emphasis on mental and physical well-being, diversity, social and economic justice, intergenerational issues, policy and programs. Credit is not allowed for both SW 417 and SW 517.

SW 418 Child Welfare Seminar 1.
Prerequisite: Students are Participants in the NC Child Welfare Education Collaborative Program.

Best practice seminar for participants in the NC Child Welfare Education Collaborative Program. Seminars focus on current issues in child welfare practice and policy. Topics vary from semester to semester. Students arrange own transportation for occasional field trips to community agencies.

SW 420 The Legal Aspects of Social Work 3.
Prerequisite: Social Work Majors and Social Work Minors.

Legal environment of the social work profession. Relationships among legal processes, the delivery of social work services and client problems.

SW 440 International Learning Experience in Social Work 6.

A seven week learning experience in Guatemala. Through this course, the student will develop a global perspective of social welfare and social work practice, will learn about the people and culture of the Lake Atitlan area of Guatemala, will learn the variety of resources available in response to social need, and will enhance or develop Spanish language competence. All costs associated with learning opportunities and activities for this course are included in the cost of the program.

SW 480 Preparation for Field Work 1.
Prerequisite: Social Work Majors, SW 320, Corequisite: SW 405, SW 408.

Introduction to aspects of field placement process and necessary skills for a successful internship. Application, interview, ethical practice, documentation, supervision and learning contract.

SW 490 Field Work in Social Services 12.
Prerequisites: Social Work Majors, SW 405, SW 408, and SW 480; Corequisite: SW 491.

Supervised placement in a social service organization; demonstration of CSWE core competencies and professional practice behaviors. Weekly integrative seminar. Intern liability insurance required. Students are expected to provide their own transportation to the internship site.

SW 491 Community-Based Field Practicum 9.
Prerequisites: SW 405 and SW 408 and SW 480; Corequisite: SW 490.

This nine-credit course is a co-requisite for, and is taken in conjunction with, SW 491 during the BSW student's final semester. Students must complete a range of 450 to 480 hours of supervised field agency practicum in an approved community-based agency. It serves as a direct practice component of the culmination of knowledge gained in the BSW courses. Field placement provides students the opportunity to practice social work skills under the supervision of a professional social worker and apply evidence-informed practices, with emphasis on social and economic justice, in their work with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities.

SW 495 Special Topics in Social Work 3.

Detailed investigation of a topic in social work. Topic and mode of study determined by faculty member.

SW 498 Independent Studies in Social Work 1-6.
Prerequisite: Junior standing or Senior standing, Social Work Majors or Social Work Minor, Nine credits in social work courses.

Independent or small group study of a social work practice or social welfare area. Individualized/Independent Study and Research courses require a "Course Agreement for Students Enrolled in Non-Standard Courses" be completed by the student and faculty member prior to registration by the department.

SW 500 Advanced Standing Seminar 4.
Corequisite: SW 505.

Orients advanced standing students to the Department and the MSW Program; provides connection between the BSW curriculum and advanced MSW curriculum; assures attainment of CSWE Foundation Curriculum Competencies; provides opportunities to demonstrate/evaluate practice skills of engagement, assessment, intervention, and evaluation; assists students with successful entry into advanced MSW program of study and advanced field placement. For graduate students in the advanced standing program.

SW 501 Social Work Policy, Services and Programs 3.

Provides students with an understanding of and critical perspective on the development of social systems, social policy and the profession of Social Work in the United States. Examination of the history, mission, philosophy, and evolution of social welfare polices and services that form the foundation of social welfare, particularly as they relate to poverty, racism, and efforts to address the needs of oppresses and marginalized populations.

SW 505 Human Behavior and the Social Environment: Social Justice 3.

Theoretical and experiential knowledge related to oppression, privilege, and social and economic justice. Particular attention is given to persons and groups most affected by oppression and mechanisms that advance the achievement of a more just society.

SW 506 Human Behavior and the Social Environment: Individuals, Families, and Groups 3.

An overview of normative individual and family development trajectories through the life cycle and survey of major theoretical frameworks and normative development variations: Theories of individual, familial, and group interaction and ways that informal groupings and support networks function to maintain individual and family well-being and stability. Admission to the MSW program or permission of the instructor.

SW 510 Research Methods for Social Work 3.
Prerequisite: ST 311.

Social work research methods, interpretation of empirical research findings within the context of social work practice. Major activities include 1)identification of the steps of the research process, 2)utilization of mixed methodologies, 3)assessment of empirical research studies, and 4)discussion of human diversity and ethical issues in research design and implementation. Admission to the MSW Program and ST 311 or equivalent.

SW 512 Evaluation of a Social Work Intervention 2.
P: SW 505 & SW 510.

Second of three courses in social work research. Evaluating social work practice and health and human services programs within different research paradigms. Prepares students for collecting, analyzing, and reporting qualitative and quantitative data; includes laboratory experience. Restricted to students who have completed all foundation courses in the MSW program.

SW 515 Child Welfare 3.

Generalist perspective on the practice of public child welfare. History of child welfare, practices in child welfare, and current trends in child welfare programs. Skills needed to practice in child protective services, adoption, and foster care with specific attention to the North Carolina child welfare system. Application of cultural diversity and cultural competency integrated throughout as it relates to child welfare issues. Credit is not allowed for both SW 415 and SW 515.

SW 516 Addiction Recovery and Social Work Practice 3.

Knkowledge and skills in identifying Alcohol and Other Drugs (AOD) problems, screening, assessment, intervention, referral, and prevention: history of AOD problems and treatment, AOD classification, effects and signs/symptoms of AOD, models of addiction, diversity, assessment, diagnosis, intervention, treatment modalities, mutual-help groups, family dynamics, prevention, and ethical considerations. Credit is not allowed for both SW 416 and SW 516.

SW 517 Direct Practice with Older Adults 3.

Physical, psychological, social, and cultural theories of the aging process as it relates to social work practice, social policy, and services for working with older adults and their families. Emphasis on mental and physical well-being, diversity, social and economic justice, intergenerational issues, policy and programs. Credit is not allowed for both SW 417 and SW 517.

SW 518 Child Welfare Seminar 1.

Best practice seminar for participants in the NC Child Welfare Education Collaborative Program. Seminars focus on current issues in child welfare practice and policy. Topics vary from semester to semester. Students arrange own transportation for occasional field trips to community agencies. Required for members of the NC Child Welfare Education Collaborative Program.

SW 520 SW Generalist Practice I 3.
C: SW 505 and SW 651.

Provides the foundation knowledge and skills needed to engage and assess individuals, families and groups. Examines underlying theories and models of research-informed practice and evidence-based social work interventions with particular emphasis on the ecological systems model from a strengths perspective. Presents the phases and dynamics of change in interpersonal helping relationships within a framework of human rights, social justice, and diversity. Restricted to students admitted to the MSW program.

SW 521 SW General Practice II 3.
P: SW 505 & SW 520; C: SW 652.

Prepares students for Social Work practice within organizations, communities and policy structures. Emphasizes multiculturalism, diversity, and social justice in relation to social systems. Restricted to students admitted to the MSW program.

SW 524 Portrayals of Social Welfare in Urban Life 3.

This course provides an in-depth analysis of social policy development in the urban context and the multi-dimensional nature of environments, communities, and individuals. Popular media (newspaper and journal articles, film, television, and textbooks) will proxy as a microcosm of contemporary social welfare problems and purported solutions. Following an ethical and social justice paradigm, this course will examine the portrayals of the urban experience and the attendant social problems of life (crime, drugs, economic bifurcation, educational system, and the media) in an economically depressed or struggling major metropolitan area.

SW 540 International Learning Experience in Social Work 6.

A seven week learning experience in Guatemala. Through this course, the student will develop a global perspective of social welfare and social work practice, will learn about the people and culture of the Lake Atitlan area of Guatemala, will learn the variety of resources available in response to social need, and will enhance or develop Spanish language competence. All costs associated with learning opportunities and activities for this course are included in the cost of the program.

SW 550 Advanced Social Work Practice with Families 3.
Prerequisite: SW 652, Corequisite: SW 654.

Theories, concepts, and skills needed for practice with diverse, at-risk family populations. Includes overview of historical and current social work approaches to family intervention as well as skill development in contemporary intervention methods. Focuses on understanding families within their cultural and community contexts, and presents several family intervention models useful for helping families build on their strengths to cope with a variety of family constellations, changes, and challenges.

SW 551 Social Work Practice with Children and Adolescents 3.
Prerequisite: SW 521 and SW 652.

Focuses on assessment and intervention strategies for clinical practice with children and adolescents. Explores issues common to these client groups.

SW 557 SW Program Development and Grant Writing 3.
Prerequisite: SW 561 & SW 653; Corequisite: SW 654.

Provides a comprehensive introduction to program development and grant writing in social work. Examines the major steps in the process including problem identification, needs assessment, program planning, and resource identification and development. Designed to provide a hands-on approach to developing grant writing and other resource development skills. Restricted to students who have completed all foundation courses in the MSW program.

SW 560 Advanced Policy Practice with Organizations and Communities 3.
Prerequisite: SW 501 & SW 521.

Second of two courses on social policy. Examines how social workers collaborate with organizations and communities to intervene in social policy. Strategies for policy practice include values clarification, legislative advocacy, analytic advocacy, and implementation advocacy. These strategies build upon concepts and skills from community development, social planning, and community organizing. Emphasis is given to working with economically disadvantaged and historically disempowered communities. Restricted to students who have completed all foundation courses in the MSW program.

SW 561 Social Work Administration and Supervision 3.
Prerequisite: SW 521 & SW 652.

Addresses the theoretical frameworks and functions of managing human service organizations. Explores personal and professional values and ethical dilemmas in exercising leadership in the management of culturally diverse community groups, boards and committee meetings. Issues of staff development, team building, group decision-making, problem solving strategies, legal structure, governance, funding, accountability systems, and human resources will be discussed. Restricted to students who have completed all foundation courses in the MSW program.

SW 571 Community Mental Health 3.
Prerequisite: SW 691.

Focuses on social work practice in the field of Mental Health. Reviews policy and practice as it pertains to the promotion of mental health, the prevention of mental illnesses, and the delivery of psychosocial treatment. Strategies and practice for use at the individual, family, group, organizational, community, and societel levels are explored. Master of social work required.

SW 580 Social Work Professional Seminar 4.
Prerequisite: SW 653.

Capstone course taken in the final semester of the MSW program intended to help students integrate all coursework in preparation for graduation and professional practice. Directs students to apply promising practices to their professional work andencourages students to interact and blend perspectives from both direct practice and community partnership concentration options.

SW 581 Advanced Social Work Practice with Individuals 3.
Prerequisite: SW 521 and SW 652.

Prepares the student for advanced generalist practice with individuals who are experiencing a range of complex life challenges. Focus on traditional and emerging social work practice theories used by social workers to assist individuals in experiencing external and/or internal stressors. Interventions with diverse populations risk. Restricted to students who have completed all foundation courses in the MSW program.

SW 582 Advanced Social Work Practices with Groups 3.
Prerequisite: SW 521 and SW 652; Corequisite: SW 653.

Focuses on advanced social work practice with groups. Uses ecological systems and empowerment perspectives to explore major theories of social work practice with groups. Critical examination of contemporary issues in designing and evaluation group interventions in assessing their impact on individual and social change. Restricted to students who have completed all foundation courses in the MSW program.

SW 583 Advanced Social Work Practice with Family Systems 3.
Prerequisite: SW 521 and SW 652; Corequisite: SW 654.

Theories, concepts, and skills needed for practice with diverse, at-risk families. Overview of historical and current social work approaches to family intervention as well as skill development in contemporary methods. Focuses on understanding families within their cultural and community contexts and presents several family intervention models useful for helping families build on their strengths to cope with a variety of family constellations, changes, and challenges experienced throughout their lifespan. Restricted to students who have completed all foundation courses in the MSW program.

SW 590 Social Work Capstone 2.

Integration of ecological systems and empowerment perspectives with concepts of intersectionality and covert and overt oppression in group and organizational life leading to design and implementation of a capstone project reflecting mastery of all curricular content and demonstrating readiness to practice as an MSW level professional social worker. Restricted to students who have completed the first semester in the Advanced Year of the MSW Program.

SW 595 Special Topics in Social Work 3-6.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

In-depth exploration of specialized or emerging topics in social work or social welfare. Topic of current interest and mode of study determined by faculty member. Also used to test and develop new courses.

SW 630 Independent Study in Social Work 1-3.
Prerequisite: Master of Social Work, SW 510.

An independent study addressing an area of social work practice or social welfare.

SW 651 Social Work Field Internship I 5.
C: SW 505 & SW 520.

First course in a two-course foundation sequence that provides students the opportunity to use generalist practice social work skills in a field agency under the supervision of an MSW social work practitioner.

SW 652 Social Work Field Internship II 5.
Prerequisite: SW 520 and SW 651, Corequisite: SW 521.

Second course in a two-course foundation field internship sequence that provides students the opportunity to use generalist practice social work skills in a field agency under the supervision of an MSW social work practitioner.

SW 653 Advanced Social Work Field Internship I 5.
C: SW 512 or 557 or 561 or 581 or 582.

First course in the advanced field internship sequence that provides students with the opportunity to use advanced generalist practice social work in a field agency under the supervision of an MSW social work practitioner.

SW 654 Advanced Social Work Field Internship II 5.
Prerequisite: SW 653; Corequisite: SW 560 or SW 561 or SW 583 or SW 590.

Second course in the advanced field internship sequence that provides students the opportunity to use advanced generalist practice social work skills in a field agency under the supervision of an MSW social work practitioner.