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Department of Sociology and Anthropology

The Department of Sociology and Anthropology offers introductory and advanced courses in anthropology and sociology. The curricula aim to provide majors with an academic background and practical experiences useful for careers in government, business and nonprofit organizations, or for pursuing advanced academic work.

Undergraduate majors may earn one of four degrees:  Bachelor of Arts in General Anthropology, Bachelor of Arts in Criminology, Bachelor of Arts in Sociology, and Bachelor of Science in Sociology (See the Graduate Catalog for information on graduate degrees offered by the department).

Honors Program

In this program, outstanding majors pursue an individual program of study involving close working relationships with departmental faculty. Twelve credit hours of honors courses and an honors thesis will allow students to enhance their expertise in sociology, criminology, and anthropology. Honors courses combine nine hours of credit in regular classes, each with additional honors work, with a three-credit honors thesis done as an independent study in consultation with a faculty honors adviser.

To be admitted, students must have earned 12 hours in their major and have a 3.25 overall GPA and a 3.25 in the major. To graduate with Anthropology/Criminology/Sociology Honors, the student must have a 3.25 GPA overall and in the major. Successful completion of the program is noted on the student’s transcript and at commencement.

Bachelor of Arts in Anthropology

The Anthropology major introduces students to anthropology with offerings in three of the subfields of the discipline: archaeology, biological anthropology, and cultural anthropology. Our program focuses on the interrelationships among the cultural, social and biological bases of human behavior in evolutionary and contemporary contexts. The degree emphasizes exposure to different cultures through classic ethnography, and a better understanding of the past through archaeology and human skeletal analysis. Theory and methods are required.  An anthropology internship is also offered.

ANT 251Physical Anthropology3
ANT 252Cultural Anthropology3
ANT 253Unearthing the Past: Introduction to World Archaeology3
or ANT 254 Language and Culture
ANT 411Overview of Anthropological Theory3
or ANT 483 Theories of Archaeological Research
Research Methods3
ANT 416Research Methods in Cultural Anthropology3
or ANT 389 Fundamentals of Archaeological Research
1 300-level ANT course3
1 400-level ANT Course3
ANT General Electives (3 courses at the 300 or 400 level)9

Specific curriculum requirements are available on the Registration and Records website.

Bachelor of Arts in Criminology

The Criminology degree provides a foundation for understanding the causes, correction and prevention of crime and the agencies involved in criminal justice. More specific areas of study concern deviance, juvenile delinquency, the court system, and correctional facilities. Students complete a 120 hour internship with a criminal justice field agency during their senior year.

SOC 202Principles of Sociology3
SOC 300Social Research Methods4
SOC 400Theories of Social Structure3
or SOC 401 Theories of Social Interaction
2 sociology courses at the 300 level or higher6
3 criminology electives at the 400 level or higher9
1 criminology-related Political Science course3
1 additional Sociology elective at any level3
SOC 413Criminal Justice Field Work4
ST 311Introduction to Statistics3

Specific curriculum requirements are available on the Registration and Records website.

Bachelor of Arts in Sociology

The Sociology degree introduces students to the scientific study of social life, social change, and the social causes and consequences of human behavior. Courses address social groups, social interaction and the institutional processes necessary to understand patterns of behavior, social inequality, social change and resistance, and how social systems work.

SOC 202Principles of Sociology3
SOC 300Social Research Methods4
SOC 400Theories of Social Structure3
or SOC 401 Theories of Social Interaction
3 additional sociology courses at the 300 level or higher12
3 additional sociology courses at the 400 level or higher9
1 additional Sociology elective at any level3
Total Units34

Specific curriculum requirements are available on the Registration and Records website.

Minor in Anthropology

A minor in Anthropology focuses on the comparative study of human beings, with an emphasis on both biology and behavior. A flexible selection of courses (15 credit hours) includes offerings from anthropological sub-disciplines such as cultural anthropology, physical anthropology, archaeology, and linguistics.

Specific curriculum requirements are available on the Registration and Records website.

Minor in Criminology

The criminology minor emphasizes criminological theory and research. The minor is grounded in sociological theory and methods and allows students flexibility in the choice of specialized criminological study such as juvenile delinquency, sociology of law, formal institutions of social control, community and crime, and data analysis in criminology.

Specific curriculum requirements are available on the Registration and Records website.

Minor in Sociology

This minor emphasizes sociological theory and research with substantive applications. The minor builds on theory and methodology and allows students flexibility in the choice of specialized sociological study such as social inequality, race and ethnic relations, gender, family, education, work, the environment, food, and community.

Specific curriculum requirements are available on the Registration and Records website.

Head

W. R. Smith


Associate Head

M Crowley


Assistant Head

D. T. Case
Director of Undergraduate Programs


Director of Graduate Programs, Sociology

S. McDonald


Director of Graduate Programs, Anthropology

N. Haenn


Anthropology Program Director

J.M. Wallace


Scheduling Officer

Sinikka Elliot


Professors

M.P. Atkinson

T.N. Greenstein

P.L. McCall

T.L. Parcel

M.L. Schwalbe

T. Shriver

M.A. Zahn


Associate professors

S. Bowen

D. T. Case

M. Crowley

S. DeCoster

S. Elliott

N. Haenn

S. Longo

S. M. McDonald

Sasha Newell

W.R. Smith

M.E. Thomas

M.S. Thompson

J.M. Wallace


Assistant professors

M. DeSoucey

K. Ebert

W. Liao

A. Manzoni

S. C. McManus

J. K. Millhauser


Professors Emeriti

V. Aldige

W.B. Clifford

E.M. Crawford

R. L. Della Fave

J. C. Leiter

R.L. Moxley

R.D. Mustian

L.B. Otto

M.M. Sawhney

C. Tittle

M.E. Voland

J. Zuiches


Associate Professors Emeriti

R.C. Brisson

R.F. Czaja

S.K. Garber

S. Lilley

I. Rovner

M.L. Walek


Assistant Professor Emerita

R. S. Ellovich


Associate Teaching Professor Emerita

W.E. Wormsley

ANT - Anthropology Courses

ANT 251 Physical Anthropology 3.

Study of human evolution. Processes of evolution, human variation and race, behavior and morphology of nonhuman primates, and the fossil record. Emphasis on the study of human biosocial adaptation, past and present, and on humans as culture-bearing primates.

ANT 252 Cultural Anthropology 3.

Comparative study of contemporary human culture, social institutions and processes that influence behavior. The range of human cultural variation shown throughout the world, including the student's own cultural system.

ANT 253 Unearthing the Past: Introduction to World Archaeology 3.

World-wide survey of origins of human society, technology and culture in Old Stone Age, and origins of agriculture, cities, and civilizations of the Bronze and Iron Age in Europe, Asia, Africa, and pre-Columbian Middle and South America.

ANT 254 Language and Culture 3.

Focus among the aspects of human language and between aspects of language and culture. Topics such as: descriptive and comparative linguistics, structuralism, language and thought, sociolinguistics, bilingualism, culture change and linguistic changes.

ANT 261 Technology in Society and Culture 3.

Processes of social and cultural change with a focus on role of technological innovation. Cross-cultural emphasis. Workplace changes and societal risks in U.S. and non-U.S. societies associated with technological innovations. Special attention to the role of scientists and engineers in socio-cultural change. Topical case studies apply course concepts and principles. Core sociological and anthropological concepts, methods, theories.

ANT 295 Special Topics in Anthropology 1-3.

Offered as needed to present 200-level subject materials not normally available in regular course offerings or for new courses on a trial basis.

ANT 310 Native Peoples and Cultures of North America 3.
Prerequisite: ANT 252 or HI 365.

Native North American peoples and cultures including Eskimos and Aleuts. Theories of origin and selected prehistoric cultural manifestations. People and cultures at the time of European contact and post-contact cultural change. Contemporary problems and prospects.

ANT 315 The Aztecs, Maya, and Their Predecessors: Archaeology of Mesoamerica 3.
Prerequisite: 3 credits of 200-level Anthropology, or HI 215 ');">HI 215, or HI 216.

This course introduces the peoples and cultures of Mesoamerica from prehistoric times to the Colonial period. Themes include the peopling of the New World, the development of agriculture and social inequity, and the rise of states and empires. Covers the cultures of the Olmec, Maya, Zapotec, and Aztec as well as the ongoing importance of these cultures for the people of Mexico and Central America. Introduces primary archaeological and ethnohistoric sources and the anthropological approach to understanding people and cultures through their material remains.

ANT 325 Andean South America 3.
Prerequisite: ANT 252 or HI 215 ');">HI 215 or HI 216.

The societies, cultures, politics, economics and ecology of the Andean countries of South America (Peru, Bolivia, Ecuador, Chile, Colombia). Special attention to the development of pre-Columbian Andean Societies.

ANT 330 Peoples and Cultures of Africa 3.
Prerequisite: ANT 252 or HI 275 or HI 276.

African peoples and cultures, especially in sub-Saharan Africa; past and present social patterns of indigenous African populations from a cross-cultural perspective.

ANT 345 Anthropology of the Middle East 3.

An introduction to the anthropology of Middle Eastern societies. Themes include religion and secularism, gender and sexuality, national identity and the state, memory and commemoration, violence and conflict, youth culture, and popular uprisings.

ANT 346 Peoples and Cultures of Southeast Asia 3.
Prerequisite: ANT 252.

Southeast Asian peoples and cultures; past and present social patterns of selected mainland and insular Southeast Asian peoples; culture change; relations between minorities and dominant ethnic groups; development of nationalism.

ANT 351 Contemporary Culture in Japan 3.
Prerequisite: FLJ 101.

Introduction to basic aspects of cultural practices in Japanese society, including education, work life, family relationships, everyday religious practices, aesthetic traditions, national identity, and gender. Students will develop an understanding of the interrelationships between language and culture.

ANT 354 Peoples and Cultures of the Pacific 3.
Prerequisite: ANT 252.

The Pacific Ocean contains thousands of inhabited islands. This course examines the millions of people and thousands of societies that live in the Pacific and its three subregional areas Melanesia, Micronesia and Polynesia. Course topics include the Pacific environment, peopling of the Pacific, regional cultural variation, social organization, Exchange systems, politics, conflict, modernization, globalization and global warming in the Pacific region.

ANT 370 Introduction to Forensic Anthropology 3.
Prerequisite: ANT 251.

Broad overview of forensic anthropology-an applied field of biological anthropology. Application of the science of biological anthropology to the legal process and humanitarian arena. Identification of skeletal remains to determine age, sex, ancestry, stature, and unique features of a decedent. General identification techniques addressed but proficiency not expected.

ANT 371 Human Variation 3.
Prerequisite: ANT 251.

Survey of basic principles of population genetics with emphasis on mechanisms that shape human biological variation. Geographic variation. Analysis of laws of heredity exhibited in modern human populations via microevolution and adaptation. Historical development of concepts with specific application to physical and forensic anthropology. Discussion of most current research.

ANT 374 Disease and Society 3.
Prerequisite: ANT 251 or ANT 252.

Survey of diseases that affect human beings and human societies past and present. Analysis of how diseases affect societies with different economies (gathering/hunting, pastoral, agricultural, industrial) and of different social complexity. Impactof diseases on human evolution.

ANT 389 Fundamentals of Archaeological Research 3.
Prerequisite: ANT 253.

Overview of the objectives, field strategies, basics of laboratory analysis, and interpretative approaches to the archaeological record. Analysis and classification of lithics, shell, bone, ceramics, metal, soils, and perishable materials.

ANT 395 Special Topics in Anthropology 1-3.
Prerequisite: 3 credits of 200-level Anthropology.

Offered as needed to present 300-level subject materials not normally available in regular course offerings or for new courses on a trial basis.

ANT 411 Overview of Anthropological Theory 3.
Prerequisite: ANT 252 and ANT 310 or ANT 325 or ANT 330 or ANT 345 or ANT 346 or ANT 354.

A detailed introduction to anthropological theory, interpretive styles and research techniques of major nineteenth and twentieth century anthropologists working within the analytic frameworks of their times, positions espoused by anthropologists in contemporary debates concerning the discipline's future. Students cannot receive credit for both ANT 411 and ANT 511.

ANT 412 Applied Anthropology 3.

History, aims, methods and ethics of applied anthropology. Anthropological practice in government, industry, community development, education, and medicine. Analysis of consequences of development programs for culture change. Credit cannot be given for both 412 and 512.

ANT 416 Research Methods in Cultural Anthropology 3.
Prerequisite: ANT 252 and one of the following: ANT 310,325,330, 346, 351, or 354.

A systematic overview of cultural anthropological research methods including designing research projects, research techniques, field work methods, and cross-cultural comparison. Reviews relevant ethical questions and anthropologists' reports of their own field work.

ANT 419 Ethnographic Field Methods 3.
Prerequisite: Six hours of cultural anthropology.

Ethnographic research methods as part of a summer field school abroad. Topics: research design, participant observation, field note writing, interviewing, sampling, coding, computers in ethnographic research, analysis and ethics.

ANT 421 Human Osteology 3.
Prerequisite: ANT 251 and any ANT 300 Level.

Survey of all the bones of the human skeleton from an anthropological perspective, including their names, important features useful in recognizing fragmentary specimens from an archaeological context, and techniques for determining the side of the body they come from. Skeletal development and its relationship to skeletal abnormalities. Issues relating to the study of archaeological skeletons.

ANT 424 Bioarchaeology 3.
Prerequisite: ANT 421.

Survey of approaches used by bioarchaeologists to understand past lifeways through the study of excavated human remains, and the theories that inform those approaches. Analysis and critique of the ways in which bioarchaeologists use skeletal and mortuary data to reconstruct health and disease patterns, mortality rates, diet, degree of interpersonal violence, and social structure among humans from the distant past.

ANT 427 Bioarchaeological Fieldwork 3.
Prerequisite: ANT 421.

An introduction to the bioarchaeology of the local region, and an overview of the objectives, field strategies, ad laboratory methods used by bioarchaeologists to prepare and study human remains from archaeological cemeteries. Includes laboratory work on field osteology and processing of skeletal remains. Provides an understanding of how bioarchaeologists proceed from excavation of osteological remains to preparation and analysis. Course is offered as part of an NCSU Study Abroad Program. All costs associated with the course, except for textbooks, are paid via the Study Abroad Program fee.

ANT 428 Human Paleopathology 3.
Prerequisite: ANT 251.

Survey of diseases that manifest on the human skeleton. Analysis and identification of these diseases from a clinical perspective through all life stages from radiographic analysis, macroscopic analysis, and photographic analysis.

ANT 431 Tourism, Culture and Anthropology 3.
Prerequisite: Three hours of cultural anthropology.

Anthropological approach to tourism studies with emphasis on cross-cultural aspects of international tourism. Attention to impact of mass tourism as compared to alternative tourism; environmental and economic impact of tourism; impact of international tourists and tourism on local communities. Principal theories of leisure in relation to tourism. Theories of culture change in relation to travel and tourism. Credit not given for both ANT 431 and ANT 531.

ANT 433 Anthropology of Ecotourism and Heritage Conservation 3.
Prerequisite: ANT 252.

Introduction to how cultures and societies view, utilize, interpret, manage and conserve environmental and cultural heritage resources; includes examination of theory and concepts of place, identity, sacred heritage, ecotourism, wildlife management as well as the cultural politics and practices of environmentalist and heritage management. Some limited travel to NC heritage sites required at student expense.

ANT 444 Cross-Cultural Perspectives on Women 3.
Prerequisite: ANT 252 and one of the following: ANT 310,325,330 or 346.

Comparison of women in a variety of societies: western and non-western; hunting and gathering to industrialized. Cross-cultural perspective on the similarity and diversity of women's statuses and roles. Effect of gender on social position.

ANT 450 Culture, Ecology, and Sustainable Living 3.
Prerequisite: One of the following: ANT 310,325,330 or 346.

Examines the myriad ways that culture serves to mediate the human-environmental equation. Focus is given to different belief systems, subsistence strategies, technological achievements, and policy formulations. Topics covered include cultural ecology, gender and the environment, land tenure, development, ethnoscience and cognitive ecology, subsistence and social organization, historical and political ecology, environmentalism, and environmental policy issues.

ANT 460 Urban Anthropology 3.
Prerequisite: ANT 252 and one of the following: ANT 310,325,330 or 346.

Anthropological study of cities. Examination of cross-cultural patterns of behavior in urban areas and adaptive strategies that urban dwellers employ. Introduction to major theoretical and methodological approaches relevant to an understanding of contemporary urbanization.

ANT 464 Anthropology of Religion 3.
Prerequisite: ANT 252 and one of the following: ANT 310,325,330 or 346.

Examination of various anthropological perspectives on the role of religion in social life, and discussion of theoretical and methodological issues pertaining to the study of ritual and belief.

ANT 475 Environmental Archaeology 3.
Prerequisites:ANT 253 and one 300-level anthropology course.

Archaeological investigation of human-environmental interactions and human impacts on ancient environments. Focuses on the causes of environmental change (climate, human activity) and the implications for understanding human nature, predicting future problems, and addressing current crises. Topics include reconstructing paleoclimate, the extinction of megafuana, anthropogenic landscapes, environmental degradation and the collapse of ancient states, sustainability and the Anthropocene.

ANT 483 Theories of Archaeological Research 3.
Prerequisite: ANT 251 or 253 and 3 cred 300-level ANT.

Covers the theories that inform archaeological research in the effort to locate and interpret material evidence about past human activities. Topics include the history of archaeology, theories of archaeological practice and interpretation, ethics, and working with stakeholders. Relies on case studies and major syntheses and critiques of current theoretical debates. Cases focus on the origins of social complexity, human-environmental interactions, and critical perspectives on inequality, race, class, gender, and ethnicity. Students may not receive credit for both ANT 483 and ANT 583.

ANT 495 Special Topics in Anthropology 3.

Detailed investigation of a topic in anthropology. Topic and mode of study determined by faculty member(s).

ANT 496 Anthropology Internship 6.
Prerequisite: ANT 412, ANT 416; Senior standing in Anthropology (B.A.).

Supervised observation and experience in work settings appropriate to anthropological perspectives. Study of the relationships between internship setting and relevant anthropological theory, methods and research. Weekly seminars, individual conferences and an integrative report. Students are responsible for arranging their own transportation to internship sites. Individualized/Independent Study and Research courses require a Course Agreement for Students Enrolled in Non-Standard Courses be completed by the student and faculty member prior to registration by the department.

ANT 498 Independent Study in Anthropology 1-6.
Prerequisite: Six hours of ANT.

Independent study of a topic in anthropology. Topic and mode of study determined by faculty member(s) and student(s). Individualized/Independent Study and Research courses require a Course Agreement for Students Enrolled in Non-Standard Courses be completed by the student and faculty member prior to registration by the department.

ANT 501 Proseminar: Introduction to Graduate Studies in Anthropology 1.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Introduction to anthropological research process; introduction to anthropology faculty; research proposal design; career planning; professional development; campus resources. Graduate standing or instructor permission required.

ANT 511 Overview of Anthropological Theory 3.
Prerequisite: ANT 252 and ANT 310 or ANT 325 or ANT 330 or ANT 345 or ANT 346 or ANT 354.

A detailed introduction to anthropological theory, interpretive styles and research techniques of major nineteenth and twentieth century anthropologists working within the analytic frameworks of their times, positions espoused by anthropologists in contemporary debates concerning the discipline's future. Students cannot receive credit for both ANT 411 and ANT 511.

ANT 512 Applied Anthropology 3.
Prerequisite: ANT 252.

History, aims, methods and ethics of applied anthropology. Anthropological practice in government, industry, community development, education, and medicine. Analysis of consequences of development programs for culture change. Credit cannot be given for both 412 and 512.

ANT 516 Qualitative Research Methods 3.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Systematic overview of qualitative research methods including theoretical perspectives, research techniques, research design and data management. Reviews relevant ethical questions and social science presentation of research findings. Credit will not be given for both ANT 416 and 516.

ANT 521 Human Osteology 3.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of instructor, Corequisite: ANT 524, ANT 529.

Survey of all the bones of the human skeleton from an anthropological perspective, including their names, important features useful in recognizing fragmentary specimens from an archaeological context, and techniques for determining the side of the body they come from. Skeletal development and its relationship to skeletal abnormalities. Issues relating to the study of archaeological skeletons.

ANT 524 Bioarchaeology 3.
Prerequisite: ANT 421.

Survey of approaches used by bioarchaeologists to understand past lifeways through the study of excavated human remains, and the theories that inform those approaches. Analysis and critique of the ways in which bioarchaeologists use skeletal and mortuary data to reconstruct health and disease patterns, mortality rates, diet, degree of interpersonal violence, and social structure among humans from the distant past.

ANT 528 Human Paleopathology 3.
Prerequisite: ANT 251.

Survey of diseases that manifest on the human skeleton. Analysis and identification of these diseases from a clinical perspective through all life stages from radiographic analysis, macroscopic analysis, and photographic analysis.

ANT 529 Advanced Methods in Forensic Anthropology 4.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

Advanced methods in forensic anthropology-an applied field of biological anthropology. Application of the science of biological anthropology to the medicolegal process. Identification of skeletal remains to determine age, sex, ancestry, stature, andunique features of a decedent. Analysis of human skeletal remains. Identification techniques addressed and proficiency expected. Students must provide their own transportation to the laboratory site.

ANT 531 Tourism, Culture and Anthropology 3.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

Anthropological approach to tourism studies with emphasis on cross-cultural aspects of international tourism. Attention to impact of mass tourism as compared to alternative tourism; environmental and economic impact of tourism; impact of international tourists and tourism on local communities. Principal theories of leisure in relation to tourism. Theories of culture change in relation to travel and tourism. Credit not given for both ANT 431 and ANT 531.

ANT 533 Anthropology of Ecotourism and Heritage Conservation 3.
Prerequisite: ANT 252.

Introduction to how cultures and societies view, utilize, interpret, manage and conserve environmental and cultural heritage resources; includes examination of theory and concepts of place, identity, sacred heritage, ecotourism, wildlife management as well as the cultural politics and practices of environmentalist and heritage management. Some limited travel to NC heritage sites required at student expense.

ANT 544 Cross-Cultural Perspectives on Women 3.
Prerequisite: 3 hours Cultural Anthropology or Graduate standing.

Comparison of women in a variety of societies: western and non-western; hunting and gathering to industrialized. Cross-cultural perspective on the similarity and diversity of women's statuses and roles. Effect of gender on social position.

ANT 550 Culture, Ecology, and Sustainable Living 3.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Examines the myriad ways that culture serves to mediate the human-environmental equation. Focus is given to different belief systems, subsistence strategies, technological achievements, and policy formulations. Topics covered include cultural ecology, gender and the environment, land tenure, development, ethnoscience and cognitive ecology, subsistence and social organization, historical and political ecology, environmentalism, and environmental policy issues.

ANT 560 Urban Anthropology 3.
Prerequisite: ANT 252 or Graduate standing.

Anthropological study of cities. Examination of cross-cultural patterns of behavior in urban areas and adaptive strategies that urban dwellers employ. Introduction to major theoretical and methodological approaches relevant to an understanding of contemporary urbanization.

ANT 564 Anthropology of Religion 3.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Examination of various anthropological perspectives on the role of religion in social life, and discussion of theoretical and methodological issues pertaining to the study of ritual and belief.

ANT 575 Environmental Archaeology 3.
,Prerequisites:ANT 253 and one 300-level anthropology course.

Archaeological investigation of human-environmental interactions. Focuses on various techniques archaeologists and paleoecologists use to reconstruct prehistoric environments. Topics include the analysis of animal remains (e.g., shellfish, fish, marine mammals, birds), soils, and plants, dating techniques, and stable isotopes. Must hold graduate standing, credit not allowed for both ANT 475 and ANT 575.,Archaeological investigation of human-environmental interactions and human impacts on ancient environments. Focuses on the causes of environmental change (climate, human activity) and the implications for understanding human nature, predicting future problems, and addressing current crises. Topics include reconstructing paleoclimate, the extinction of megafuana, anthropogenic landscapes, environmental degradation and the collapse of ancient states, sustainability and the Anthropocene.

ANT 575 Environmental Archaeology 3.
,Prerequisites:ANT 253 and one 300-level anthropology course.

Archaeological investigation of human-environmental interactions. Focuses on various techniques archaeologists and paleoecologists use to reconstruct prehistoric environments. Topics include the analysis of animal remains (e.g., shellfish, fish, marine mammals, birds), soils, and plants, dating techniques, and stable isotopes. Must hold graduate standing, credit not allowed for both ANT 475 and ANT 575.,Archaeological investigation of human-environmental interactions and human impacts on ancient environments. Focuses on the causes of environmental change (climate, human activity) and the implications for understanding human nature, predicting future problems, and addressing current crises. Topics include reconstructing paleoclimate, the extinction of megafuana, anthropogenic landscapes, environmental degradation and the collapse of ancient states, sustainability and the Anthropocene.

ANT 583 Theories of Archaeological Research 3.
Prerequisite: ANT 251 or 253 and 3 cred 300-level ANT.

Covers the theories that inform archaeological research in the effort to locate and interpret material evidence about past human activities. Topics include the history of archaeology, theories of archaeological practice and interpretation, ethics, and working with stakeholders. Relies on case studies and major syntheses and critiques of current theoretical debates. Cases focus on the origins of social complexity, human-environmental interactions, and critical perspectives on inequality, race, class, gender, and ethnicity. Students may not receive credit for both ANT 483 and ANT 583.

ANT 585 Skeletal Biology in Anthropology 3.

Skeletal biology is the study of human skeletal remains; understanding past populations' demographics, health and disease, physical activity, diet, and biological relatedness to other groups, past and present. Must hold graduate standing.

ANT 587 Cultural Resource Management 3.

Theoretical and practical overview of U.S. federal and state laws, institutions, and practices related to the inventory, evaluation, preservation, protection, and overall management of cultural resources; history and philosophical bases of Cultural Resource Management (CRM); professional ethics; indigenous and other stakeholder interests in CRM; and comparative national regulations outside the U.S. and the international heritage management and organizations. Graduate standing in history required.

ANT 595 Special Topics in Anthropology 1-6.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

In depth exploration of specialized topics in Anthropology. Also used to test and develop new courses.

ANT 598 Independent Study in ANT 1-3.

Independent study of a topic in anthropology. Topic and mode of study determined by faculty member(s) and student(s).

ANT 610 Special Topics in Anthropology 1-6.

Provision for in-depth investigation of some particular topic in anthropology. Reflection of current student needs and interests through variations in course content and mode of study. Determination of topics by faculty member(s) and student.

ANT 693 Masters Supervised Research 1-9.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

Instruction in research, and research under the mentorship of a member of the Graduate Faculty. Restricted to Masters Students in Anthropology.

ANT 695 Masters Research 1-9.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

Thesis research conducted under the supervision of student's thesis committee chair or other graduate faculty member. Restricted to Masters Students in Anthropology.

ANT 696 Summer Thesis Res 1.

ANT 699 Masters Thesis Preparation 1-9.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

For students who have completed all credit hours, full-time enrollment, and other requirements for the masters degree, and are writing and defending their thesis. Restricted to Masters Students in Anthropology.

ANT 810 Special Topics in Anthropology 1-6.

Provision for in-depth investigation of some particular topic in anthropology. Reflection of current student needs and interests through variations in course content and mode of study. Determination of topics by faculty member(s) and student.

SOC - Sociology Courses

SOC 202 Principles of Sociology 3.

Introduction to sociology. Analyses of key processes and institutions including interaction, inequality, organization, socialization, and social change. Addresses experiences and outcomes of diverse groups in U.S. society. Includes core sociological concepts, methods, theories.

SOC 203 Current Social Problems 3.

Examination of social problems linked to structures of economic, political, gender and racial inequality; including poverty, disease, racism, sexism, unemployment, psychological distress, educational failure, environmental destruction and violence. Possible solutions viewed from a variety of perspectives. Includes core sociological concepts, methods and theories.

SOC 203A Current Social Problems 3.
Requisite: Agricultural Institute Only.

Examination of social problems linked to structures of economic, political, gender and racial inequality; including poverty, disease, racism, sexism, unemployment, psychological distress, educational failure, environmental destruction and violence. Possible solutions viewed from a variety of perspectives. Includes core sociological concepts, methods and theories.

SOC 204 Sociology of Family 3.

Contemporary American family structures and processes and their development. Focus on socialization, mate selection, marital adjustment and dissolution. Includes core sociological concepts, methods, theories.

SOC 205 Jobs and Work 3.

Work experience in terms of intrinsic and extrinsic rewards for worker. Work experience as intersection of occupation, industry, organization, region, and time period. Research skills for comparing job options to individual goals. Includes core sociological theories, concepts and methods.

SOC 206 Social Deviance 3.

Social processes in the creation and maintenance of deviant populations: classification, objectification of social meanings, functions of subcultures and social outcomes of the deviance-ascription process. Includes core sociological concepts, methods, theories.

SOC 220 Cultural Geography 3.

Investigates the world's past and present cultural diversity by studying spatial patterns of population, language, religion, material and non-material culture, technology and livelihoods, communities and settlements and political organization and interaction.

SOC 241 Sociology of Agriculture and Rural Society 3.

Application of sociological concepts, methods, theories and styles of reasoning to major social problems facing rural America. Changing structure of agriculture; social impact of agricultural technology; rural community growth and decline; rural industrialization, rural poverty, natural resources and environmental issues in rural America. Includes core sociological concepts, methods, theories.

SOC 241A Sociology of Agriculture and Rural Society 3.
Requisite: Agricultural Institute Only.

Application of sociological concepts, methods, theories and styles of reasoning to major social problems facing rural America. Changing structure of agriculture; social impact of agricultural technology; rural community growth and decline; rural industrialization, rural poverty, natural resources and environmental issues in rural America. Includes core sociological concepts, methods, theories.

SOC 261 Technology in Society and Culture 3.

Processes of social and cultural change with a focus on role of technological innovation. Cross-cultural emphasis. Workplace changes and societal risks in U.S. and non-U.S. societies associated with technological innovations. Special attention to the role of scientists and engineers in socio-cultural change. Topical case studies apply course concepts and principles. Core sociological and anthropological concepts, methods, theories.

SOC 295 Special Topics in Sociology 1-3.

Offered as needed to present 200-level subject materials not normally available in regular course offerings or for new courses on a trial basis.

SOC 300 Social Research Methods 4.
Prerequisite: SOC 202, Corequisite: ST 311.

Basic methods of social research, research design, sampling, data collection, measurement, and analysis; the relationship between theory and research. Laboratory exercises on computer applications.

SOC 301 Human Behavior 3.
Prerequisite: 3 cr. in SOC, 200 level.

The development of personality as a consequence of social interactions and behavior of individuals in social contexts. Processes of learning, socialization, social perception, organization, stability and change of attitudes, norms, norm-formation and conformity, social roles and role strain, interpersonal attraction, and intergroup and intragroup relations.

SOC 304 Women and Men in Society 3.
Prerequisite: 3 cr. in SOC, 200 level.

A sociological analysis of women and men in contemporary American society. Perpetuation of and change in gender stratification using sociological concepts. theories and research. How gender expectations developed and transmitted. Historical data and research on diversity in American society used for analysis of causes and consequences of gender inequality.

SOC 305 Racial and Ethnic Relations 3.
Prerequisite: 3 cr. in SOC, 200 level.

Study of the nature of the relationships among racial and ethnic groups in societies around the world but with emphasis on the United States. Explores topics such as inequalities of wealth, power, and status, racism, conflict, and social boundaries among groups. Current trends in intergroup relations are discussed.

SOC 306 Criminology 3.
Prerequisite: 3 cr. in SOC, 200 level.

Study of processes whereby behavior is defined as crime and persons are identified as criminals. Includes a sociological investigation of agencies of law enforcement, adjudication, corrections and prevention; patterns of criminal behavior; explanations of variations in criminality with emphasis on sociocultural and sociopsychological theories.

SOC 309 Religion and Society 3.
Prerequisite: 3 cr. in SOC, 200 level.

Religious beliefs, practices and organizations addressed as social phenomena. Structural functionalism, conflict and subjectivism as theoretical orientations for understanding influences between religion and society. Relationship of religions to family, government, and economy and to social divisions, conflict and change.

SOC 311 Community Relationships 3.
Prerequisite: 3 cr. in SOC, 200 level.

Institutions, organizations and agencies found in modern communities; social problems and conditions with which they deal; their interrelationships and trends toward comprehensive planning.

SOC 342 International Development 3.
Prerequisite: 3 cr. in SOC, 200 level.

Sociological explanations of the causes of development and underdevelopment and origins of the present world system with emphasis on lesser developed countries. Recent global changes in the world situation including the increasing internationalization and interdependence of all countries.

SOC 350 Food and Society 3.
Prerequisite: 3 credits of a 200-level Sociology.

Relationships among individuals, groups, and organizations in the production, consumption, and distribution of food. Influences of gender, class, race, and ethnicity. Impacts of laws and regulations, markets, and social movements.

SOC 351 Population and Planning 3.
Prerequisite: 3 credits in SOC at the 200 level.

Effects of births, deaths, and migration on population size, composition and distribution. Comparisons across U.S. and non-U.S. societies. Socioeconomic and political implications of demographic change. Impact of alternative policies on demographic processes.

SOC 381 Sociology of Medicine 3.
Prerequisite: 200 level Sociology.

Use of theory and empirical studies to understand the social etiology of disease health practices, practitioners, and institutions, and the special area of mental health. Historical as well as contemporary examples of social influences on, and effects of, health throughout the world, but especially in the United States. Core sociological concepts, methods, theories.

SOC 395 Special Topics in Sociology 1-3.
Prerequisite: 3 credits of a 200-level Sociology.

Offered as needed to present 300-level subject materials not normally available in regular course offerings or for new courses on a trial basis.

SOC 400 Theories of Social Structure 3.
Prerequisite: 3 cr. in SOC, 200 level.

Contributions of Durkheim, Marx, Weber and others to contemporary macro-level sociological theories. Origins and development of functionalist and conflict approaches. Theories of social solidarity, class structure, the state, bureaucratization, ideology. Uses of original works.

SOC 401 Theories of Social Interaction 3.
Prerequisite: 3 cr. in SOC, 200 level.

Contributions of Weber, Simmel, Mead, Homans, Goffman and others to contemporary micro-level sociological theories. Origins and development of symbolic interaction, ethnomethodology, exchange theory and dramaturgy. Theories of the self, social construction of reality, emotions, interpersonal relationships. Interrelationship of theory and research; use of original works.

SOC 402 Urban Sociology 3.
Prerequisite: SOC 300.

Urban social structures emphasizing determinants and consequences of changes in urban places and life styles. Current urban problems and various approaches to urban social planning.

SOC 404 Families and Work 3.
Prerequisite: SOC 200 level, SOC 300.

Sociological analysis of the interplay between economy and family. How men and women make decisions regarding work and family. Theory and research techniques appropriate to the student of work/family conflicts.

SOC 405 Racism in the U.S. 3.
Prerequisite: SOC 300.

The course will examine the nature of racism in American society and its correlates: prejudice, discrimination, racial conflict, and racial oppression. Emphasis on the history and development of racism in the U.S. as well as its impact on minority groups. Sociological explanations for the emergence and continuation of racism.

SOC 407 Sociology of Sexualities 3.
Prerequisite: 3 hours SOC 200 level, 300 level.

Exploration of sexuality in a social context. Relationship between sexuality, gender and power in the U.S. Historical trends in behaviors and identities: social movements and sexual issues; current behavioral trends. Some issues covered; identity, social construction, sexual meanings.

SOC 410 Sociology of Organizations 3.
Prerequisite: 3 cr. in SOC, 200 level, SOC 300.

Application of sociological theories to study of organizational structures and processes. Special attention to control and coordination, relations with other organizations, and decision making.

SOC 413 Criminal Justice Field Work 4.
Prerequisite: SOC 306 and PS 305, Senior standing in Criminal Justice option.

Supervised observation and experience in a criminal justice agency. Study of relationships between ongoing programs and relevant political and sociological theory and research. Weekly seminars, small groups and individual conferences. Presentation of an integrative report.

SOC 414 Social Class 3.
Prerequisite: SOC 300.

The universality of social inequality, its bases and consequences. Relationship of social inequality to social class, life chances, life styles and social mobility. Theories and research methods pertinent to the study of social class.

SOC 418 Sociology of Education 3.
Prerequisite: SOC 300.

Application of sociological theories to education, relating processes of stratification, socialization and organization. Sociological analysis of classrooms and learning. Connections of schooling with family, community and work. Cross-cultural and U.S. research.

SOC 425 Juvenile Delinquency 3.
Prerequisite: 3 cr. in SOC 200-level; SOC 300.

Nature and extent of juvenile delinquency; measurement problems; and biogenic, psychogenic and sociogenic theories of delinquency causation. Policy implications of delinquency theories for treatment and prevention. Evaluation of treatment and prevention programs.

SOC 427 Sociology of Law 3.
Prerequisite: 3 cr. in SOC 200-level; SOC 300.

Sociological concepts, theories and research of law as social control. Social forces behind the creation, maintenance and application of law in American Society.

SOC 428 Formal Institutions of Social Control 3.
Prerequisite: 3 hours SOC 200 level; SOC 300.

Development, structure and behavior of formal institutions of social control in the United States (police, courts, corrections); divergent philosophies of punishment that guide the juvenile and adult criminal justice system, dimensions of inequalitythat influence processing decisions and effectiveness of formal institutions in controlling violations of legal norms.

SOC 429 Quantitative Data Analysis in Sociology 3.
Prerequisite: SOC 300 or ST 311 or equivalent.

Analysis of quantitative data in sociology, including relationship between theory and research, operationalization and measurement of concepts, descriptive and inferential statistics using computer statistical software, interpreting statistical findings and writing research papers.Sociology and Criminology majors or consent of the instructor.

SOC 430 Community and Crime 3.
Prerequisite: 3 credits in SOC 200 level; SOC 300.

Neighborhood development, structure and processes as related to delinquency, crime and criminality. Divergent theories of the effect of neighborhood context on crime and crime on neighborhood processes. The interaction of person and neighborhood context. Implications of community processes for social control.

SOC 432 Violence, Terrorism, and Public Policy 3.
Prerequisite: SOC 300 or PS 371.

The course examines interpersonal and group violence in contemporary societies and the causes for its occurrences. Specific forms of violence that will be examined include domestic violence, gangs, homicide, and terrorism, domestically and internationally. Throughout the course students will use data to critically evaluate policies and practices to prevent and control violence and will examine potential solutions to the problems of violence.

SOC 440 Social Change 3.
Prerequisite: 3 cr. in SOC, 200 level; SOC 300.

Sources, processes and consequences of social change on macro and micro levels. Applications of classical and contemporary theories to historical and modern examples of social change in international, national, regional, community, and institutionalsettings. Examples of empirical studies and appropriate methodologies for each level of analysis.

SOC 445 Inequality, Ideology, and Social Justice 3.
Prerequisite: 3 hours of 200-level SOC and SOC 300.

Systematically addresses the question of why people believe what they do about the legitimacy of inequality; explores the role of self-interest, secular and religious values, considers specific types of ideology such as meritocracy, racism, sexism, colonialism; applies various theories to explain patterns of belief; looks at the role of media and propaganda in shaping beliefs.

SOC 450 Environmental Sociology 3.
Prerequisite: 3 hours SOC 200 level, SOC 300.

Systematic relations between natural environment and human societies. Dependency on the natural world. Population technology, cultural and economic influences on ecosystems. Development of environmentalism and alternative models for understanding threats and potentials. current environmental issues and considerations of their global contexts.

SOC 457 Corporate Power in America 3.
Prerequisite: (SOC 202 or SOC 203) and SOC 300.

Examines the nature, distribution, and exercise of power in U.S. society. Emphasizes corporate power and its relationship to government. Topics include membership in the upper class and the power elite, media and shaping of public opinion, the culture of politics, formation of political consciousness, and the emergence of oppositional and reactionary social movements.

SOC 465 Social Aspects of Mental Health 3.
Prerequisite: SOC 300.

A survey of the role of social environment and life experiences in mental health and mental disorder, focusing on the link between social inequality and emotional inequality. Topics include the social construction of mental illness and the classification process, social distribution of mental health, explanations of mental health differences. Special emphasis on adolescent and adult traumas that shape the life course.

SOC 492 External Learning Experience 1-6.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

A learning experience in sociological research that utilizes facilities and resources which are external to the campus. Students are placed with organizations to apply sociological concepts in planning or conducting a research project. Contact the Sociology & Anthropology undergraduate coordinator to obtain department approval.

SOC 493 Special Problems in Sociology 1-6.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

A learning experience in sociological research that utilizes campus facilities and resources. Arrangements must be initiated by the student and approved by the instructor prior to the experience. Contact the Sociology & Anthropology undergraduate coordinator to obtain department approval.

SOC 495 Special Topics in Sociology 1-3.

Offered as needed to present materials not normally available in regular course offerings or for new courses on a trial basis.

SOC 498 Independent Study in Sociology 1-6.
Prerequisite: Six hours SOC above the 200 level.

A detailed investigation of a topic in sociology. Topic and mode of study determined by the faculty member(s) in consultation with the department head. Individualized/Independent Study and Research courses require a "Course Agreement for Students Enrolled in Non-Standard Courses" be completed by the student and faculty member prior to registration by the department.

SOC 508 Social Organization 3.
Prerequisite: SOC 400 or SOC 701.

Introduction to study of social structure. Focus on inequality, work, organizations, the economy, the state. Classic writings and their impacts.

SOC 509 Population Problems 3.
Prerequisite: SOC 202.

Examination of population growth, rates of change and distribution. Emphasis on functional roles of population, i.e., age, sex, race, residence, occupation, marital status and education. Stress on population dynamics fertility, mortality and migration. Analysis on population policy in relation to national and international goals stressing a world view.

SOC 514 Developing Societies 3.
Prerequisite: Six hrs. SOC or ANT or Graduate standing or PBS status.

Definition of major problems posed for development sociology and exploration of social barriers and theoretical solutions for development set forth with regard to newly developing countries. Review of significant past strategies and presentation of main themes in current development schemes. Proposal and discussion of untested strategies for the future. Examination of these problems in their national and international contexts.

SOC 533 The Community 3.
Prerequisite: Six hrs. SOC.

The community viewed in sociological perspective as a functioning entity. Presentation and application of a method of analysis to eight "dimensions," with emphasis on the unique types of understanding to be derived from measuring each dimension. Finally, analysis of effect of change on community integration and development.

SOC 591 Special Topics In Sociology 1-6.

An examination of current problems organized on a lecture-discussion basis. Course content varies as changing conditions require new approaches to emerging problems.

SOC 601 Seminar 1-3.

Appraisal of current literature; presentation of research papers by students; progress reports on departmental research; review of developing research methods and plans; reports from scientific meetings and conferences; other professional matters. Credits Arranged.

SOC 610 Special Topics In Sociology 1-6.

An examination of current problems organized on a lecture-discussion basis. Course content varies as changing conditions require new approaches to emerging problems.

SOC 642 Practicum In Sociology 1-6.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing in the Master of Sociology program and nine hrs. of SOC at the 500-600 level.

Opportunity for student under supervision of graduate advisory committee chair and organization/agency supervisor to develop and demonstrate competency in the area of graduate specialization through application of sociological knowledge to practicalproblems facing the organization/agency.

SOC 685 Master's Supervised Teaching 1-3.
Prerequisite: Master's student.

Teaching experience under the mentorship of faculty who assist the student in planning for the teaching assignment, observe and provide feedback to the student during the teaching assignment and evaluate the student upon completion of the assignment.

SOC 690 Master's Examination 1-9.
Prerequisite: Master's student.

For students in non thesis master's programs who have completed all other requirements of the degree except preparing for and taking the final master's exam. Credits Arranged.

SOC 693 Master's Supervised Research 1-9.
Prerequisite: Master's student.

Instruction in research and research under the mentorship of a member of the Graduate Faculty.

SOC 695 Master's Thesis Research 1-9.
Prerequisite: Master's student.

Thesis Research.

SOC 696 Summer Thesis Research 1.
Prerequisite: Master's student.

For graduate students whose programs of work specify no formal course work during a summer session and who will be devoting full time to thesis research.

SOC 699 Master's Thesis Preparation 1-9.
Prerequisite: Master's student.

For students who have completed all credit hour requirements and full-time enrollment for the master's degree and are writing and defending their thesis. Credits arranged.

SOC 701 Classical Sociological Theory 3.
Prerequisite: Six hrs. SOC and Graduate standing or PBS status.

The interdependence of theory and research in sociology; major theoretical classics in the discipline and how they provide foundations for subsequent developments and for analysis in substantive areas.

SOC 702 Contemporary Sociological Theory 3.
Prerequisite: SOC 701.

Works by major figures representing leading schools of sociological theory in the post-World War II period studied as primary sources. Underlying assumptions made explicit, the structure of the theory, including propositions, examined critically anddiscussion of relationships with other theoretical perspectives.

SOC 707 Quantitative Sociological Analysis 3.
Prerequisite: ST 507.

Introduction to application of common quantitative methodologies in sociology including multiple regression and path analysis. Emphasis on selecting appropriate analytical techniques, model estimation and sociological interpretation of findings.

SOC 708 Advanced Sociological Analysis 3.
Prerequisite: SOC 711, ST 507 or ST 711.

Examination of advanced analysis techniques adaptable to needs of sociological research. Special attention given to causal analysis, analysis of change and aggregate versus individual level data analyses. Consideration of sociological examples. Attention to emerging issues and techniques.

SOC 710 Teaching Sociology 3.
Prerequisite: Admission to sociology graduate program.

The objective of this course is for students to further their skills in teaching sociology. Students will plan an undergraduate course, construct a teaching philosophy, evaluate a variety of teaching techniques, and demonstrate an understanding of teaching as a sociological phenomenon.

SOC 711 Research Methods In Sociology I 3.
Prerequisite: SOC 300, ST 311.

Issues in philosophy of science, causation, relationship of theory and research. Qualitative, experimental and survey design methodologies.

SOC 712 Advanced Survey Research Methods 3.
Prerequisite: SOC 711 and SOC 707.

Advanced survey methodology including research design, sampling, questionnaire development and surveys using the World Wide Web. Designing and executing substantive and methodological studies using surveys to perationalize behavioral and social constructs and to test hypotheses.

SOC 713 Applied Research 3.
Prerequisite: SOC 202.

Studies research process with emphasis upon its application to action problems. Stress upon development of research design to meet action research needs.

SOC 715 Qualitative Sociological Methods and Analysis 3.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Survey of qualitative sociological research methods. Practice in research design and evaluation, multiple forms of data gathering and data analysis. Theoretical and epistemological issues as related to qualitative sociology, with special attentionto ritical and feminist epistemological debates.

SOC 721 Deviant Behavior 3.
Prerequisite: Six hrs. SOC or ANT or Graduate standing or PBS status.

Topics include: the inevitability of deviance and its social utility; cross-cultural variations in appearance and behavioral cues for labeling the deviant; descriptive and explanatory approaches to kinds and amounts of deviance in contemporary American society; social change, anomie and social disorganization theories; the process of stigmatization; formal and informal societal responses to deviance and the deviant; social action implications.

SOC 722 Social Control 3.
Prerequisite: Six hrs. SOC above 200 level or Graduate standing or PBS status.

Examination of need, functions, utilization and effects of both informal and formal social control mechanisms. Emphasis and critical evaluation of theoretical perspectives on social control and the empirical support for these positions.

SOC 723 Research On Crime and Deviance 3.
Prerequisite: SOC 721.

Major topics including an examination of conceptual problems and research issues and methods in study of crime and deviance; an assessment of current research on crime causation and deviance processes; an examination of research on social control processes and agencies; and an assessment of social action and evaluative research. A variety of substantive topics dealt with in the context of above topical areas including: delinquency, drug usage, mental illness, obesity, stuttering, suicide, prostitution, homicide and rape.

SOC 727 Comparative Societies 3.
Prerequisite: Six hrs. SOC.

Sociological analysis of societies around the world with particular reference to North and South America. Special emphasis given to cultural and physical setting, population composition, levels of living, relationship of the people to the land, structure and function of major institutions and forces making for change.

SOC 731 Survey Of Family Sociology 3.
Prerequisite: SOC 202.

Examination of structural and demographic continuities and changes for American families in general and within major subgroups (e.g., race, ethnicity, social class). Consideration of historical and cross-cultural comparisons. Assessment of the impact of families upon their members and the dynamics of marital and family relationships.

SOC 732 Contemporary Family Theory and Research 3.
Prerequisite: SOC 731.

Emphasis on contemporary research, theory and methodological techniques used by sociologists studying families. Critical examination of where field is now and where it appears to be heading. Primarily for graduate students designing or doing research about families.

SOC 736 Social Stratification 3.
Prerequisite: Six hrs. SOC.

The theoretical background, methodological approaches and analysis of the consequences of systems of stratification. Emphasis on static and dynamic qualities of stratification systems on relations within and between societies. Attention to the integrative and divisive quality of stratification as expressed in life styles, world views, etc.

SOC 737 Sociology Of Gender 3.
Prerequisite: Graduate student, SOC 736 OR 731.

Theories about the development and maintenance of gender. Historical development of gender stratification. How individuals "do gender" in their daily lives. Contemporary research and substantive readings about gender in public and intimate relationships.

SOC 738 Race and Ethnic Inequality 3.
Prerequisite: Six hours of Sociology.

Theoretical and methodological approaches and critical debates on race. Impact of racial discrimination on inequality. Effects of inequality on community institutions. Formation of attitudes and identities.

SOC 739 Social Psychology Of Inequality 3.
Prerequisite: SOC 746 or 508.

The effects of race, class and gender inequality on the formation of group consciousness, self-evaluations, emotions, values, attitudes and beliefs. Attention to interpersonal processes through to reproduction of inequality in everyday life.

SOC 746 Sociological Social Psychology 3.
Prerequisite: SOC 401t.

Central issues in sociological social psychology, including formation of the self, effects of social structure on individual development, emergence of ritualized interaction and tension between individual agency and societal constraint. Emphasis on symbolic interactionist and dramaturgical perspectives.

SOC 752 Work and Industry 3.
Prerequisite: SOC 400 or SOC 508 or SOC 701.

Control of economy and workplace. Special attention to economic restructuring, the labor process and recent workplace innovations. Theories include managerialism, bank hegemony and deskilling. Historical studies complement analyses of contemporary settings and issues.

SOC 753 Inequality in Work and the Economy 3.
Prerequisite: SOC 701.

Sociological study of structural inequality in labor markets and workplaces with implications for class, race, gender, and spatial disparities in employment-related outcomes. Special attention is paid to job quality, spatial disparities in employment opportunity, and processes contributing to race and gender disparities in job attainment and rewards.

SOC 754 Economic Sociology 3.
Prerequisite: SOC 701.

Embeddedness of economic action by individuals, firms, and states within a social context. Topics include globalization, restructuring, the informal economy, social capital, spatial organization, labor markets and role of the state.

SOC 791 Special Topics In Sociology 1-6.

An examination of current problems organized on a lecture-discussion basis. Course content varies as changing conditions require new approaches to emerging problems.

SOC 810 Special Topics In Sociology 1-6.

An examination of current problems organized on a lecture-discussion basis. Course content varies as changing conditions require new approaches to emerging problems.

SOC 885 Doctoral Supervised Teaching 1-3.
Prerequisite: Doctoral student.

Teaching experience under the mentorship of faculty who assist the student in planning for the teaching assignment, observe and provide feedback to the student during the teaching assignment, and evaluate the student upon completion of the assignment.

SOC 890 Doctoral Preliminary Exam 1-9.
Prerequisite: Doctoral student.

For students who are preparing for and taking written and/or oral preliminary exams.

SOC 893 Doctoral Supervised Research 1-9.
Prerequisite: Doctoral student.

Instruction in research and research under the mentorship of a member of the Graduate Faculty.

SOC 895 Doctoral Dissertation Research 1-9.
Prerequisite: Doctoral student.

Dissertation Research.

SOC 896 Summer Dissertation Research 1.
Prerequisite: Doctoral student.

For graduate students whose programs of work specify no formal course work during a summer session and who will be devoting full time to thesis research.

SOC 899 Doctoral Dissertation Preparation 1-9.
Prerequisite: Doctoral student.

For students who have completed all credit hour requirements, full-time enrollment, preliminary examination, and residency requirements for the doctoral degree, and are writing and defending their dissertations.