Breadcrumb Navigation:

cos-med.jpg

Department of Chemistry

http://www.ncsu.edu/chemistry

General Overview

The Chemistry Department consists of approximately 250 undergraduate majors, 125 graduate students, 28 tenure track, 11 non- tenure track faculty, and 23 staff members in a variety of technical, instructional, and clerical support roles.  The Department occupies three large buildings, Dabney Hall, Cox Hall and the Fox Undergraduate Laboratory.  In addition, several research groups are located on the Centennial Campus.

Undergraduate Degrees.  The Chemistry Department offers two undergraduate degree programs to meet the needs of students interested in chemistry:  The Bachelor of Science (B.S.) is the degree that meets certification by the American Chemical Society through its Committee on Professional Training. The B.S. degree provides the breadth and depth of experience to give graduates a wide choice of career options, and is especially suited for further study in chemistry graduate school or a career in the chemical industry.  The Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree has fewer required chemistry courses and less laboratory time than the B.S. It provides more flexibility for students to design a chemistry program with more electives to meet a wider set of career goals or to pursue a double major.  

The Chemistry Department typically graduates about 45-55 B.S. and B.A. chemistry majors each year, ranking in the top 50 in total graduates for the 600+ colleges and universities that offer the American Chemical Society accredited degree.  Approximately one-half of graduates go to graduate or professional school, including the most elite institutions.  The other half of our graduates who gain employment directly upon graduation are equally distributed among careers in the chemical industry, government, and careers outside of chemistry (including business and law).

Honors Program

Second semester sophomores or first semester juniors in the Chemistry B.S. program with an overall GPA of 3.5 or higher are invited to join the Chemistry Honors Program.

Chemistry Honors students must maintain a GPA of at least 3.25 to graduate with honors. In addition, the departmental requirement for students in the Honors Program is the completion of 9 extra credit hours of work NOT required by their degree programs. Between 3-6 credit hours can come from research conducted in laboratories in the Department of Chemistry. Research in other laboratories of molecular sciences may also be considered. However, in the latter case, prior approval is required. A 3-page report and a letter from the supervisor indicating the nature of the work, time spent in the lab, and performances are required at the end (before finals week) of the semester in which the research is conducted. It should be noted that simply working in a research lab does not necessarily meet the requirements of the Honors Program. The nature of the work must be meaningful research. The rest of the credit hour requirements can be met with 500 level or higher courses in chemistry, biochemistry, polymer sciences, materials sciences, biotechnological sciences and pharmacological sciences. Courses in other subject areas may be considered. However, prior approval is required. If you are in doubt as to whether a particular course will count toward the Chemistry Honors Program, please contact Dr. Alex Nevzorov.

Curricula

The B.A. program offers a flexible course of studies for students who do not necessarily plan to become professional chemists but who desire an interdisciplinary program with an emphasis on chemistry. The proper choice of electives will prepare the graduate for any of the following:

  • medical, veterinary, or dental school
  • work in chemical sales and management
  • teaching in secondary schools
  • work in environmental science
  • graduate school in an allied science.
  • This route is also an excellent premedical or predental program.

The B.S. curriculum, accredited by the American Chemical Society, includes a strong, broad background in mathematics, physics, and the liberal arts. The basic areas of organic, physical, inorganic, and analytical chemistry are stressed. Laboratory and classroom work develop the skills, knowledge, and inquiring spirit necessary for a successful career in chemistry. The advised elective credits allow individual diversity at the junior and senior levels. Many undergraduates participate in current departmental research through part-time employment or research projects. The B.S. curriculum prepares the student to enter the job market directly as a chemist or to enter various graduate schools in chemistry or an allied science.

Specific curriculum requirements are available on the Registration and Records website.

Interim Department Chair

Edmond F. Bowden


Associate Department Chair

Laura Sremaniak


Director of Facilities

Laura Sremaniak


Directors of Undergraduate Studies

Jeremiah Feducia

Gregory Neyhart


Director of Graduate Studies

David Shultz


Glaxo Distinguished University Professor

J.S. Lindsey


Howard Schaeffer Professor

C. Melander


Jacob and Betty Belin Distinguished Professor

D. Muddiman


Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professors

A.J. Banks

M.T. Oliver-Hoyo

K.A. Sandberg


Distinguished Professors of Chemistry

D. Muddiman

M-H. Whangbo


Undergraduate Professor Emeriti

F.C. Hentz, Jr.

W.P. Tucker


Professors

A.J. Banks

E.F. Bowden

F. Castellano

S.F. Franzen

C. B. Gorman

J.S Lindsey

J.D. Martin

C.C. Melander

D.C. Muddiman

M.T. Oliver-Hoyo

D.A. Shultz

A.I. Smirnov

M-H. Whangbo


Professors Emeriti

R.D. Bereman

C.L. Bumgardner

H.H. Carmichael

D.L Comins

F.W. Getzen

K.W. Hanck

S.T. Purrington

W.P. Tucker

J.L Whitten


Adjunct Professors

R. Buenker

A. Deiters

B. Gunnoe

B. M. Novak


Associate Professors

R.A. Ghiladi

E. Ison

P.A. Maggard

A.A. Nevzorov

T.L. Smirnova

D.S. Argyropoulos, Forest Biomaterials

L.A. Lucia, Forest Biomaterials

D.W. Brenner, Materials Science and Engineering

L. Sombers

G. Williams


Associate Professor Emeriti

C.B. Boss

W.L. Switzer

D.W. Wertz


Adjunct Associate Professors

R. Mantz

J.L. White


Assistant Professors

W.C. Chang

D. Fourches

E. Jakubikova

V. Lindsay

J. Pierce

C. Proulx

G. Wang

W.W. Weare


Research Assistant Professors

J. C. Deaton

M. Voynov

R.J. Worthington


Teaching Professors

P.A. Brown

K.A. Sandberg

L.E. Sremaniak


Teaching Associate Professors

M.T. Gallardo-Williams

G.A. Neyhart

R.W. Warren


Teaching Assistant Professors

J. Feducia

A. Ison

L.M. Petrovich

G. Rabah


Senior Lecturer

J.C. Folmer


Lecturer Emeritus

S. Levine


Freshman Undergraduate Advisor

J. Hawkins-Morton

CH - Chemistry Courses

CH 100 Chemistry and Society 4.

Awareness and understanding of chemistry in everyday life for the non-science student. Non-mathematical treatment of essential fundamental concepts. Emphasis on practical applications of chemistry to consumer affairs, energy, medicine, food, sports, and pollution. Credit is not allowed for CH 100 if student has prior credit for CH 101.

CH 101 Chemistry - A Molecular Science 3.
Prereq: One yr of high school chemistry and successful completion of the Chem Placement Exam or Chem Modules Exam, or completion of CH 111 w/ C- or better. Coreq: CH 102. ADD BOTH CH 101 and CH 102 TO YOUR SHOPPING CART AND THEN ENROLL SIMULTANEOUSLY.

A fundamental study of molecular bonding, structure, and reactivity. Principles of atomic structure, ionic and covalent bonding, reaction energetics, intermolecular forces, precipitation reactions, acid/base reactions, oxidation/reduction processes, and introductions to organic and inorganic chemistry.

CH 102 General Chemistry Laboratory 1.
Corequisite: CH 101.

Laboratory experience to accompany CH 101. Introduction to basic laboratory equipment and skills.

CH 103 General Chemistry I for Students in Chemical Sciences 3.
Prerequisites: (Pass Chemistry Placement Exam, or Chemistry Placement Modules Exam, or CH 111 with a grade of C- or better) and eligibility for MA 107; Co-requisite: CH 104.

A study of the structure of atoms and the periodic trends of the elements, chemical bonding, the spatial and electronic structure of molecules, chemical reactions, quantification of materials and reactions, energy changes of reactions, and properties of gases. First half of a two semester sequence for students interested in a chemistry or closely related career. This course is open to 17CHEMBS, 17CHEMBA, 14EFY-14CHEI, 11BIOCHBS, 11LSFY-11BCHI, and 17MARSCBS-17MARSCCHM majors and to students with departmental approval. Students cannot receive credit for both CH 101 and CH 103.

CH 104 General Chemistry Laboratory I for Students in Chemical Sciences 1.
Co-requisite: CH 103.

Laboratory and computer-based experiments in chemical formulas, atomic structure, bonding, qualitative analysis, solutions, quantitative analysis of acids and bases, and calorimetry. First half of a two semester sequence for students interested in a chemistry or closely related career. This course is open to 17CHEMBS, 17CHEMBA, 14EFY-14CHEI, 11BIOCHBS, 11LSFY-11BCHI and 17MARSCBS-17MARSCCHM majors and to students with departmental approval. Students cannot receive credit for both CH 102 and CH 104.

CH 111 Preparatory Chemistry 3.

Preparation for CH101. Review of main topics from high school emphasizing nomenclature, vocabulary, the periodic table and problem solving. Emphasis on mathematical skills, data handling, reaction types, stoichiometry and solutions. Credit for CH 111 is not allowed if a student has prior credit in CH 101. Credit for CH 111 does not count towards graduation for students in curricula that require CH 101.

CH 201 Chemistry - A Quantitative Science 3.
Prerequisite: CH 101 with grade C- or better, CH 102, and eligibility for MA 121 or higher, Corequisite: CH 202.

Detailed quantitative aspects of solutions, solution stoichiometry, thermodynamics, chemical equilibrium, acid-base equilibria, solubility equilibria, electrochemistry, chemical kinetics, and nuclear chemistry.

CH 202 Quantitative Chemistry Laboratory 1.
Prerequisite: CH 101, CH 102, Corequisite: CH 201.

Laboratory experience to complement CH 201. Experimental exploration of thermodynamic, kinetic, and electrochemical behavior.

CH 203 General Chemistry II for Students in Chemical Sciences 3.
Prerequisites: (CH 101 with a minimum of 3 grade points or CH 103), and (CH 102 or CH 104), and eligibility for MA 131 or higher; Co-requisite: CH 204.

A study of intermolecular forces between molecules, and their affect on the properties of solids, liquids and gases, and on phase changes. The interplay of energetics and chemical kinetics on equilibria, including gas phase, acid-base, redox, and solubility equilibria. Second half of a two semester sequence for students interested in a chemistry or closely related career. This course is open to 17CHEMBS, 17CHEMBA, 14EFY-14CHEI, 11BIOCHBS, 11LSFY-11BCHI, and 17MARSCBS-17MARSCCHM majors and to students with departmental approval. Students cannot receive credit for both CH 201 and CH 203.

CH 204 General Chemistry Laboratory II for Students in Chemical Sciences 1.
Co-requisite: CH 203.

Laboratory experiments in solid state materials, preparation and analysis of an organic compound, separations, gases, solutions, equilibrium, acids and bases, and kinetics. Second half of a two semester sequence for students interested in a chemistry or closely related career. This course is open to 17CHEMBS, 17CHEMBA, 14EFY-14CHEI, 11BIOCHBS, 11LSFY-11BCHI, and 17MARSCBS-17MARSCCHM majors and to students with departmental approval. Students cannot receive credit for both CH 202 and CH 204.

CH 220 Introductory Organic Chemistry 4.
Prerequisite: CH 101.

A one-semester course in the fundamental principles of organic chemistry. Preparation, reactions, and physical properties of alkanes, cycloalkanes, alcohols, alkyl halides, aromatic compounds, aldehydes, ketones, organic acids, acid derivatives, and amines. Credit is not allowed for both CH 220 and CH 221.

CH 221 Organic Chemistry I 3.
Prerequisite: CH 101 with a grade of C- or better and CH 102; Corequisite: CH 222.

First half of two-semester sequence in the fundamentals of modern organic chemistry. Structure and bonding, stereochemistry, reactivity and synthesis of carbon compounds. Detailed coverage of aliphatic hydrocarbons, alcohols, ethers, and alkyl halides. Introduction to spectral techniques of IR, UV-vis, and NMR. Students cannot receive credit for both CH 221 and CH 225.

CH 222 Organic Chemistry I Lab 1.
Prerequisite: CH 101 and CH 102; Corequisite: CH 221.

Laboratory experience to accompany CH 221. Introduction to basic organic laboratory equipment and techniques. Students cannot receive credit for both CH 222 and CH 226.

CH 223 Organic Chemistry II 3.
Prerequisite: CH 221 with a grade of C- or better and CH222; Corequisite: CH 224.

Second half of two-semester sequence in the fundamentals of modern organic chemistry. Structure and bonding, stereochemistry, reactivity and synthesis of carbon compounds. Detailed coverage of aromatic hydrocarbons, condensation reagents, and selected biological chemistry topics such as carbohydrates, lipids, and amino acids. Students cannot receive credit for both CH 223 and CH 227.

CH 224 Organic Chemistry II Lab 1.
Prerequisite: CH 221 and CH 222; Corequisite: CH 223.

Laboratory experience to accompany CH 223. Introduction to basic organic laboratory equipment and techniques. Students cannot receive credit for both CH 224 and CH 228.

CH 225 Organic Chemistry I for Students in Chemical Sciences 3.
Prerequisites: (CH 201 or CH 203) and (CH 202 or CH 204); Co-requisite: CH 226.

First half of a two semester sequence in organic chemistry for students interested in a chemistry or closely related career. Structure and bonding, stereochemistry, reactivity and synthesis of aliphatic hydrocarbons, alcohols, ethers and alkyl halides. Introduction to IR, NMR, and mass spectral techniques. This course is open to 17CHEMBS, 17CHEMBA, 14EFY-14CHEI, 14CHEBS, 11BIOCHBS, 11LSFY-11BCHI, and 17MARSCBS-17MARSCHM majors and to students with departmental approval. Students cannot receive credit for both CH 221 and CH 225.

CH 226 Organic Chemistry Laboratory I for Students in Chemical Sciences 1.
Co-requisite: CH 225.

First half of a two semester laboratory sequence in organic chemistry for students interested in a chemistry or closely related career. Laboratory experiments in the determination of physical properties of organic compounds, separation of mixtures and purification of compounds, synthesis and spectroscopic characterization of organic compounds, and the execution of a multi-step synthesis. This course is open to 17CHEMBS, 17CHEMBA, 14EFY-14CHEI, 14CHEBS, 11BIOCHBS, 11LSFY-11BCHI and 17MARSCBS-17MARSCHM majors and to students with departmental approval. Students cannot receive credit for both CH 222 and CH 226.

CH 227 Organic Chemistry II for Students in Chemical Sciences 3.
Prerequisites: (CH 221 B or better or CH 225) & (CH 222 or CH 226); Corequisite: CH 228; Restricted to:17CHEMBS, 17CHEMBA, 14CHEI, 14CHEBS, 11BIOCHBS, or 17MARSCHM majors or dept approval. Students cannot receive credit for both CH 223 and CH 227..

Second half of a two semester sequence in organic chemistry for students interested in a chemistry or other closely related career. Structure and bonding, stereochemistry, reactivity and synthesis of aromatic compounds. Condensation reactions and organic compounds of biological interest. This course is open to 17CHEMBS, 17CHEMBA, 14EFY-14CHEI, 14CHEBS, 11BIOCHBS, 11LSFY-11BCHI and 17MARSCBS-17MARSCHM majors and to students with departmental approval. Students cannot receive credit for both CH 223 and CH 227.

CH 228 Organic Chemistry Laboratory II for Students in Chemical Sciences 1.
Co-requisite: CH 227.

Second half of a two semester laboratory sequence in organic chemistry for students interested in a chemistry or closely related career. Laboratory experiments in multi-step organic synthesis, identification and characterization of compounds by spectroscopic methods. Searching the chemical literature. This course is open to 17CHEMBS, 17CHEMBA, 14EFY-14CHEI, 14CHEBS, 11BIOCHBS, 11LSFY-11BCHI and 17MARSCBS-17MARSCHM majors and to students with departmental approval. Students cannot receive credit for both CH 224 and CH 228.

CH 230 Computational Chemistry Lab I 1.
Prerequisite: CH 221 or CH 225: Co-requisite: MA 241.

An introduction to computational methods in the chemical sciences. A quantitative introduction to inter- and intramolecular forces in gas and condensed phases. Potential energy surfaces of molecules and chemical reactions. First of a two-semester sequence.

CH 232 Computational Chemistry Lab II 1.
Prerequisite: CH 221 or CH 225, Corequisite: MA 241.

An introduction to computational methods in the chemical sciences. A computer-based introduction to quantum mechanics, including atomic and molecular orbitals and molecular orbital theory with applications to inorganic chemistry.

CH 295 Special Topics in Chemistry 1-3.

Special topics in chemistry at the early undergraduate level. Trial offerings of new or experimental courses in chemistry. Enrollment requires permission of the department.

CH 315 Quantitative Analysis 3.
Prerequisite: (CH 201 or CH 203) with a grade of C- or better, Co-requisite: CH 316.

Introduce the fundamental principles and modern techniques of chemical analyses. This includes examination of electrolytic solutions, including acid-base, oxidation-reduction, and solubility equilibria, and introduction to spectrochemical, electrochemical, volumetric and chromatographic methods of analysis, modern chemical instrumentation, and interpretation of data.

CH 316 Quantitative Analysis Laboratory 1.
Prerequisite: (CH 201 or CH 203) and (CH 202 or CH 204); Corequisite: CH 315.

Application of spectrochemical, electrochemical, volumetric, and chromatographic methods of analysis for the identification and quantification of components in a mixture.

CH 331 Introductory Physical Chemistry 4.
Prerequisite: (CH 201 or CH 203) and (CH 202 and 204) and (MA 231 or 241) and (PY 205 or PY 211).

Fundamental physiochemical principles including chemical thermodynamics, physical and chemical equilibrium, electrochemistry and reaction kinetics. For students requiring only a single semester of physical chemistry.

CH 335 Principles of Green Chemistry 4.
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in CH 101/102, CH 201/202 (or equivalent general chemistry series), and CH 221/22 (or equivalent).

Introduction to the topic of green chemistry as an emerging field; Identification of hazards and classes; overview of sources; alternative solvents and reagents; sustainability of chemical reactions; alternative chemical reactions and pathways; alternative feedstocks; enzymatic catalysis; ionic liquids; re-engineering of chemical processes; chemical synthesis.

CH 401 Systematic Inorganic Chemistry I 3.
Prerequisite: (CH 201 or CH 203) with grade of C- or better..

Descriptive chemistry of the elements with particular attention to their reactions in aqueous solution. Emphasis on the chemistry of the main group elements and the periodicity of their chemical properties. Introduction to transition element and coordination chemistry. Major paper required.

CH 403 Systematic Inorganic Chemistry II 3.
Prerequisite: CH 401, CH 431.

Development and application of theoretical principles to the structure and energies of inorganic substances. Particular attention to the chemistry of coordination compounds of the transition elements. Special applications to bioinorganic chemistry,organometallic chemistry, and inorganic solid state chemistry.

CH 415 Analytical Chemistry II 3.
Prerequisite: CH 315 or PCC 412.

Methods of quantitative analysis based on electronic instrumentation. Signal processing and electronics, spectroscopy (atomic, x-ray fluorescence, infrared/Raman, surface), voltammetry, chromatography (gas, liquid), mass spectrometry as well as chemical transducers and statistical methods of data handling.

CH 431 Physical Chemistry I 3.
Prerequisite: (CH 201 or CH 203) and MA 242 and (PY 203 or 208); Corequisite: MA 341.

Development of the basic concepts of quantum mechanics and wavefunctions as applied to atomic structure, to the translational, rotational and vibrational motion in molecules, and to molecular spectroscopy. Development of partition functions as applied to thermodynamic properties of materials. Cannot get credit for both CH 431 and CH 437.

CH 433 Physical Chemistry II 3.
Prerequisite: MA 341.

A classical thermodynamic treatment of states of matter, activities and chemical potentials, energy changes, equilibria, and electrochemical processes. The kinetics of multi-step, catalytic and enzyme reactions.

CH 435 Introduction to Quantum Chemistry 3.
Prerequisite: CH 431.

An introduction to the basic principles of quantum theory and its application to atomic and molecular structure and spectroscopy.

CH 437 Physical Chemistry for Engineers 4.
Prerequisite: PY 208 and CHE 315 and MA 341.

Selected physiochemical principles including quantum theory, spectroscopy, statistical thermodynamics, and rates of chemical reactions. Credit may not be claimed for both CH 431 and CH 437.

CH 441 Forensic Chemistry 3.
Prerequisite: (CH 201 or CH 203) and (CH 223 or CH 227).

Chemical identification (recognition), and chemical separation techniques (identification) used to demarcate class and individual characteristics relevant in legal claims.

CH 442 Advanced Synthetic Techniques 4.
Prerequisite: CH 223 or CH 227, Corequisite: CH 401.

An advanced laboratory class in the synthesis, separation and characterization of organic, inorganic, and polymeric materials. Techniques include reactions under inert atmosphere, column chromatography, fractional distillations, NMR spectroscopy, and other advanced procedures. Scientific writing is emphasized.

CH 444 Advanced Synthetic Techniques II 4.
Prerequisite: CH 442.

An advanced laboratory class in the synthesis, separation and characterization of organic, inorganic, polymer and materials compounds. Techniques include literature searches, reactions, under inert atmosphere, column chromatography, fractional distillations, NMR spectroscopy, and other advanced procedures. This course builds upon the skills acquired in CH 442 and has significant independent work.

CH 452 Advanced Measurement Techniques I 4.
Prerequisite: CH 431.

Modern analytical and physical chemistry laboratory techniques. Emphasis on statistical methods, chemical thermodynamics, chromatography, atomic and molecular spectroscopy, report writing, scientific methodology, and laboratory safety.

CH 454 Advanced Measurement Techniques II 4.
Prerequisite: CH 311 or CH 315.

Laboratory course designed on systematic method development in practical applications for the separation and analysis of environmental, pharmaceutical and biologically important samples. Isocratic and gradient elution HPLC separations and temperature programming in GC are covered. In addition to GC, the three major HPLC modes of Reversed Phase, Ion Exchange, and Hydrophilic Interaction will be studied for separations of mixtures of small organic molecules and biologically important molecules such as peptides and carbohydrates.

CH 463 Molecular Origins of Life 3.
Prerequisite: BCH 351 or BCH 451 or Permission of Instructor.

Survey of the present state of understanding of the molecular mechanisms leading to the emergence of sustainable self-replicating systems in the prebiotic era on the early Earth, including historical context, experimental studies, and theoretical foundation. The course will include a focus on the fundamental chemistry of and mechanisms for the plausible prebiotic formation of diverse biomolecules (including amino acids, sugars, nucleotides, lipids, tetrapyrroles) and self-organizing chemistry leading to protocells, the proposed early progenitors of living cells. Credit will not be given for both CH 463 and CH 563.

CH 495 Special Topics in Chemistry 1-4.

Special topics in chemistry at the advanced undergraduate level. Trial offerings of new or experimental courses in chemistry. Enrollment requires permission of the department.

CH 499 Undergraduate Research in Chemistry 1-3.
Prerequisite: Two years of chemistry.

Independent investigation of a research problem under the supervision of a chemistry faculty member. Individualized/Independent Study and Research courses require a Course Agreement for Students Enrolled in Non-Standard Courses be completed by the student and faculty member prior to registration by the department.

CH 563 Molecular Origins of Life 3.
Prerequisite: (CH 201 or CH 203) and (CH 221 or CH 225) and (CH 223 or CH 227), and BCH 451/equivalent..

Survey of the present state of understanding of the molecular mechanisms leading to the emergence of sustainable self-replicating systems in the prebiotic era on the early Earth, including historical context, experimental studies, and theoretical foundation. The course will include a focus on the fundamental chemistry of and mechanisms for the plausible prebiotic formation of diverse biomolecules (including amino acids, sugars, nucleotides, lipids, tetrapyrroles) and self-organizing chemistry leading to protocells, the proposed early progenitors of living cells. Credit for both CH 463 and CH 563 will not be allowed.

CH 572 Proteomics 3.
Prerequisite: BIT 410 or BIT 510 or BCH 454 (or approval from the instructor).

Introduction and history of the field of proteomics followed by the principles and applications of proteomics technology to understand protein expression and protein post-transitional modifications. Laboratory sessions include growing yeast with stable-isotope labeled amino acids, protein purification, Western blots, protein identification and quantification, and protein bioinformatic analysis. This is a half-semester course.

CH 601 Seminar 1.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing in CH.

Review and discussion of scientific articles, progress reports on research and special problems of interest to chemists.

CH 610 Special Topics In Chemistry 1-6.

Detailed study of a particular problem or technique pertaining to chemistry.

CH 677 Advanced Chemistry Projects 1-3.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing in CH.

Independent literature study of a current subject in chemistry. Required written critical review paper of selected subject.

CH 685 Master's Supervised Teaching 1-3.
Prerequisite: Master's student.

Teaching experience under the mentorship of faculty who assist the student in planning for the teaching assignment, observe and provide feedback to the student during the teaching assignment, and evaluate the student upon completion of the assignment.

CH 690 Master's Examination 1-9.
Prerequisite: Master's student.

For students in non-thesis master's programs who have completed all other requirements of the degree except preparing for and taking the final master's exam.

CH 693 Master's Supervised Research 1-9.
Prerequisite: Master's student.

Instruction in research and research under the mentorship of a member of the Graduate Faculty.

CH 695 Master's Thesis Research 1-9.
Prerequisite: Master's student.

Thesis research.

CH 696 Summer Thesis Research 1.
Prerequisite: Master's student.

For graduate students whose programs of work specify no formal course work during a summer session and who will be devoting full time to thesis research.

CH 699 Master's Thesis Preparation 1-9.
Prerequisite: Master's student.

For students who have completed all credit hour requirements and full-time enrollment for the master's degree and are writing and defending their thesis.

CH 701 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry I: Structure and Bonding 3.

Study of periodic table/trends, symmetry and molecular orbital theory of small molecules and extended structures, transition-metal coordination complexes, acid/base and redox reactivity of polyatomic ions, solid-state structures, and selected special topics.

CH 703 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry II: Applications of Group Theory to Bonding and Spectroscopy 3.
Prerequisite: CH 701 or equivalent.

This course uses group theory as the basis for developing molecular orbital theory, vibrational spectroscopy, and electronic spectroscopy. Together, these methods are used to discuss topics of current research interest in inorganic chemistry.

CH 705 Organometallic and Inorganic Reaction Mechanism 3.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Coverage of concepts of bonding and structure of transition metal complexes with emphasis on the interaction of transition metal fragements with organic ligands; study of experimental methods of mechanistic study; treatment of inorganic and organometallic reactions including metal-mediated organic synthesis, metal-catalyzed polymer synthesis, and models of bioinorganic systems.

CH 711 Advanced Analytical Chemistry I 3.
Prerequisite: CH 433; CH 415.

First semester of two-semester integrated sequence covering advanced methods for extraction and interpretation of chemical information from electronic/optical signals in chemical analysis. Digital and analog electronics, signal acquisition and processing, chemometrics, and instrumentation.

CH 713 Advanced Analytical Chemistry II 2.
Prerequisite: CH 711.

Second semester of two-semester integrated sequence covering advanced methods for extracting and interpreting chemical information from electronic/optical signals in chemical analysis. Digital and analog electronics, signal acquisition and processing, chemometrics, and instrumentation.

CH 714 Electronics and Instrumentation Laboratory 1.
Prerequisite: CH 711, Corequisite: CH 713.

Laboratory course covering operation and application of analog and digital electronics in context of chemical instrumentation. Circuit elements, integrated circuits, microprocessors and computers, data acquisition systems, and signal processing.

CH 721 Advanced Organic Chemistry I 3.
Prerequisite: CH 223 or CH 227 or CH 433 or CH 435.

Introduction to physical organic chemistry. Topics include: bonding/introductory molecular orbital theory, reactive intermediates, aromaticity, pericyclic reactions, thermochemistry, linear free-energy relationships, kinetics, and transition-state theory. Topics and concepts are related to molecular reactivity and reaction mechanisms.

CH 723 Advanced Organic Chemistry II 3.
Prerequisite: CH 721.

Introduction to acid-base theory and mechanistic organic chemistry as applied to synthetically useful organic reactions.

CH 725 Physical Methods in Organic Chemistry 3.
Prerequisite: (CH 223 or CH 227) and CH 433 or CH 435.

Application of physical methods to the solution of structural problems in organic chemistry. Methods discussed include electronic absorption spectroscopy, vibrational spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance, and mass spectrometry.

CH 727 Mass Spectrometry 3.
Prerequisite: CH 223 or CH 227.

Interpretation of mass spectra emphasizing characterization of organic molecules. Instrumentation topics: types of mass analyzers such as magnetic sector, quadrupole and time-of-flight; hybrid instruments such as GC/MS, LC/MS and MS/MS; and ionization methods including EI, CI, laser desorption and fast atom bombardment. Applications: quantitation, environmental analysis, and peptide and DNA sequencing.

CH 730 Advanced Physical Chemistry 3.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Survey of chemical thermodynamics and kinetics, with emphasis on reactions in liquid phase. Problem solving an important part of course. Designed for review and expansion on materials usually covered in a one-year undergraduate physical chemistry course.

CH 732 Advanced Physical Chemistry in Biological Applications 3.
Prerequisite: CH 431 and CH 433 and BCH 453 or equivalent..

Modern views on structure, function, and thermodynamic stability of biological macromolecules including proteins, nucleic acids, and biological membranes; theories and models of protein folding, high resolution experimental methods for structure determination of soluble and membrane proteins including solution and solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

CH 734 Spectroscopic Methods in Chemical Biology 3.
Prerequisite: CH 331 or CH 431, CH 433 or equivalent.

Physical principles underlying the experimental spectroscopic methods used to study structure and dynamics of biological macromolecules. Detailed discussion of experimental techniques include high-resolution solution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Electron Paramagnetic Resonance in combination with spin labeling and spin trapping methods, and fluorescence spectroscopy, including single molecule methods and fluorescence microscopy. This course is offered every third semester from Spring 2010.

CH 735 Magnetic Resonance in Chemistry 3.
Prerequisite: CH 331 or CH 431, CH 433 or equivalent.

This course is focused on physical and quantum mechanical principles that make magnetic resonance the most important spectroscopic technique in chemistry. Detailed discussion of description of magnetic resonance phenomena and NMR and EPR experimental techniques covers both classical and quantum mechanical treatments. Students of diverse backgrounds will gain in-depth knowledge of modern magnetic resonance as applied to problems in chemistry, materials, and nano-science, and biophysics.

CH 736 Chemical Spectroscopy 3.
Prerequisite: CH 435.

Introduction to rotational, vibrational and electronic molecular spectroscopy from a quantum mechanical viewpoint. Emphasis on the elucidation of structure, bonding and excited state properties of organic and inorganic molecules.

CH 737 Quantum Chemistry 3.
Prerequisite: MA 301, CH 435 or PY 407.

Elements of wave mechanics applied to stationary energy states and time-dependent phenomena. Applications of quantum theory to chemistry, particularly chemical bonds.

CH 743 Electrochemistry 3.
Prerequisite: CH 431 or CH 433.

Thermodynamics and kinetics of electrode reactions presented as well as experimental methods for studying them. Particular emphasis on measurement of standard potential and establishing number of electrons transferred. Applications of electrochemistry in production/storage of energy and in chemical analysis.

CH 745 Chemical Separation 3.
Prerequisite: CH 415, CH 416, Corequisite: CH 610 OR 810.

Basic principles of methods in chemical separation including gas chromatography, liquid chromatography, etc. Theory, instrumentation and applications of various chromatographic and electrophoretic techniques.

CH 747 Nanobiotechnology 3.

An introduction to nanobiotechnology, with a focus on biological applications such as bioimaging and biosensing. Principles underlying methods of nanomaterials fabrication and characterization will be introduced, and major characterization techniques will be discussed. Au nanoparticles, quantum dots, and carbon nanotubes will be used as representative examples of novel nanomaterials with unique properties. The strengths and weaknesses of various nanomaterials in biological applications will be compared through in-class discussions.

CH 755 Organic Reaction Mechanisms 3.
Prerequisite: CH 723, CH 433.

Effects of structure and substituents on direction and rates of organic reactions.

CH 757 Combinatorial Bioorganic Synthetic Chemistry 3.
Prerequisite: BCH 453 or equivalent.

Modern topics in synthetic chemistry that underpin bioorganic chemistry including peptide synthesis, nucleic acid synthesis, and diverse methods for combinatorial syntheses of such biomolecules and analogues.

CH 759 Natural Products 3.
Prerequisite: CH 723 and CH 725.

Illustrative studies of structure determination, synthesis and biosynthesis of natural substances. Stress upon modern physical methods and fundamental chemical concepts. Examples from such classes as alkaloids, terpenes, steroids and antibiotics.

CH 765 Chemistry of Materials 3.
Prerequisite: CH 201 or equivalent.

Detailed examination of the relationship between chemical structure and physical properties of materials with potential use in applications. Different classes of molecules and materials requirements for several applications will be emphasized.

CH 770 Bioinorganic Chemistry 3.
Prerequisite: CH 401.

The interface between inorganic and biological chemistry will be explored, focusing on the catalytic processes in metalloenzymes, and with an emphasis on the diverse roles of transition metals in biology. The physical methods required for the study of bioinorganic systems will be introduced, with application toward determining enzymatic mechanisms. Selected topics will include heme chemistry, nitrogen fixation, C-H bond activation, electron transfer, oxygen transport, metal ion uptake and toxicity, drug activation and/or metabolism by metalloenzymes, and metallodrugs.

CH 772 Solid State Chemistry 3.
Prerequisite: CH 701 or equivalent.

Selected topics in solid-state chemistry including: extended symmetry, structure, bonding, characterizations, and special topics. Graduate standing in Chemistry required.

CH 795 Special Topics in Chemistry 1-6.

CH 801 Seminar 1.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing in CH.

Review and discussion of scientific articles, progress reports on research and special problems of interest to chemists.

CH 810 Special Topics In Chemistry 1-6.

Detailed study of a particular problem or technique pertaining to chemistry.

CH 815 Advanced Topics In Chemistry 1-3.

Critical study in one of branches of chemistry.

CH 877 Advanced Chemistry Projects 1-3.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing in CH. 1-3.

Independent literature study of a current subject in chemistry. Required written critical review paper of selected subject.

CH 885 Doctoral Supervised Teaching 1-3.
Prerequisite: Doctoral student.

Teaching experience under the mentorship of faculty who assist the student in planning but the teaching assignment, observe and provide feedback to the student during the teaching assignment, and evaluate the student upon completion of the assignment.

CH 890 Doctoral Preliminary Examination 1-9.
Prerequisite: Doctoral student.

For students who are preparing for and taking written and/or oral preliminary exams.

CH 893 Doctoral Supervised Research 1-9.
Prerequisite: Doctoral student.

Instruction in research and research under the mentorship of a member of the Graduate Faculty.

CH 895 Doctoral Dissertation Research 1-9.
Prerequisite: Doctoral student.

Dissertation research.

CH 896 Summer Dissertation Research 1.
Prerequisite: Doctoral student.

For graduate students whose programs of work specify no formal course work during a summer session and who will be devoting full time to thesis research.

CH 899 Doctoral Dissertation Preparation 1-9.
Prerequisite: Doctoral student.

For students who have completed all credit hour, full-time enrollment, preliminary examination, and residency requirements for the doctoral degree, and are writing and defending their dissertations.