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Department of Textile Engineering, Chemistry and Science

The Department of Textile Engineering, Chemistry, and Science offers Bachelor of Science degrees in Polymer and Color Chemistry, Textile Engineering, and Textile Technology as well as several minors. The department is uniquely interdisciplinary, dedicated to providing instruction in the science, engineering, and technical application of chemistry, color, polymers, bio-medicals, design, and production with regard to fibers and fiber-based materials.

Polymer and Color Chemistry

The B.S. in Polymer and Color Chemistry is a flexible and rigorous program that provides courses in fundamental chemistry, while incorporating some unique areas of applied chemistry in polymers and color chemistry. The applied courses are heavily oriented to the chemistry and technology of polymers, including polymer synthesis, extrusion and characterization. In addition, the color chemistry component of the degree includes the synthesis and application of dyes and other compounds associated with the coloration of materials, as well as the science of color perception and color measurement.

The degree program offers three concentrations: American Chemical Society (ACS) Certified, Science and Operations and Medical Sciences. The ACS Certified concentration is designed for students wishing to pursue advanced studies in chemistry and related subjects and the Medical Sciences Concentration is for those students who wish to pursue medical school, dental school, pharmacy or optometry. This concentration includes all courses a student will need for application to these professional programs. Each concentration incorporates a number of electives allowing students to develop focus areas, including medical textiles, polymer chemistry, and color chemistry. More information about the degrees is available on the the TECS PCC website.

Textile Engineering

The B.S. in Textile Engineering provides a broad base of fundamental engineering courses as a foundation for studies in textile engineering. The textile engineering courses deal with the application of scientific and engineering principles to the design and control of all aspects of fiber, textile and apparel processes, products and machinery. These include natural and man-made materials, interaction of materials with machines, safety and health, energy conservation, six-sigma quality, and computer information systems. The B.S. in Textile Engineering is offered jointly with the College of Engineering. For more details about the program,see description under the College of Engineering.

Textile Technology

The B.S. in Textile Technology provides students with basic knowledge of fiber materials, science and technologies of fiber processing, as well as fiber-based product design and development. The curriculum prepares students in product design and development processes, beginning with understanding of application to material selection to appropriate technologies to utilize.

The Textile Technology degree program offers a well rounded versatile degree, which prepares graduates to collaborate effectively with professionals in a global interdisciplinary environment. After introductory exposure to several of the fundamental aspects of fiber science and textile technology, the student can build additional depth in one of the three concentrations of Medical Textiles, Technical Textiles, and Textile Supply Chain Operations or stay in the general degree which allows students the flexibility of designing their own interest or transferring from other programs or community colleges. The Medical Textiles concentration covers design and methods of production of state-of-the-art textile products and devices used in medical applications including sutures for wound closing to cardiac support devices. The Technical Textiles concentration covers design principles, understanding of applications, and technologies relevant to the vast array of technical textiles materials and products used in such areas as transportation, storage, packaging, automobile engineering, geotechnical engineering, and much more. This concentration offers two options: Materials and Non-wovens. The Textile Supply Chain Operations concentration focuses on the design, management, and coordination all the activities required to transform raw materials into finished textile products to retail. More information about the degrees is available on the TECS TT website.

Minors offered in Textile Engineering, Chemistry and Science

The department offers several minors to students who do not want to double major in one of the degrees but would like to get some of the same experiences.

Minor in Polymer and Color Chemistry

The minor in Polymer and Color Chemistry is available to majors in any field except Polymer and Color Chemistry. The program is designed to expose students to the technical and scholarly disciplines of polymer chemistry, fiber formation, color physics, dyeing, and chemical modification of fibers and fabrics, and gives them an opportunity to learn how basic disciplines are applied in an industrial environment. Any interested students should contact the Department of Textile Engineering, Chemistry, and Science for information about the minor and its prerequisites.

Minor in Textile Technology

The minor in Textile Technolgoy is available to majors in any field except Textile Technology. The program allows students to explore the principles of textile technology and design using fibrous media. Students also have the opportunity to use textile technology facilities and state-of-the-art computer aided design systems as part of the minor. Any interested students should contact the Department of Textile Engineering, Chemistry, and Science for information about the minor and its prerequisites.

Minor in Nonwovens

The minor in Nonwovens is available to majors in any field except Textile Technology. Nonwovens is a 20 billion dollar industry just in North Carolina and covers a wide range of products and usages from filtration systems for purifying ari, blood and water, various types of wipes, many medical applications, etc. The processing of nonwovens depends on a range of technologies, some adapted from the textile and paper industries, others developed uniquely for nonwovens production. This program will allow the student to take those textile technology classes that deal with nonwoven processes and products as well as exposed to all the equipment.

Head of Department of Textile Engineering, Chemistry and Science

J. A. Joines


Associate Head

M. Pasquinelli
Director of Graduate Programs

R.E. Gorga
Director of Undergraduate Programs


Burlington Chair in Textile Technology

R.L. Barker


Ciba Professor of Dyestuff Chemistry

H.S. Freeman


Cone Mills Professor of Textile Chemistry

D. Hinks


Lineberger Chair in Yarn Manufacturing

W. Oxenham


William A. Klopman Distinguished Professor

B. Pourdeyhimi


INVISTA Professor of Fiber and Polymer Chemistry

A.E. Tonelli


Professors

T. K. Ghosh

P.J. Hauser

S.M. Hudson

W.J. Jasper

M.W. King

S. Michielsen

J.P. Rust

R. Shamey

X. Zhang


Teaching Professor

H. Hamouda


Associate professors

P. Banks-Lee

P. D. Bradford

E. DenHartog

A.M. El-Shafei

R.E. Gorga

G.L. Hodge

J.A. Joines

R. Kotek

W.E. Krause

J.P. Lavelle

M.A. Pasquinelli


Assistant professors

E. Ford

W. Gao

J.S. Jur

E. Shim
Assistant Professor

N. R. Vinueza-Benitez


Adjunct professors

A. Bogdanovich
Adjunct Professor

T.G. Clapp


Professors emeriti

K.R. Beck

P.L. Grady

B.S. Gupta

G.N. Mock


Research Assistant Professors

B. Mazé

B. Ormand

M. Szymczyk


Adjunct Lecturer

S. Dunning

A. L. Hunt

G.D. Knight


Associate Member Professors

L. I. Clarke

M. G. McCord

MT - Medical Textiles Courses

MT 105 Introduction to Medical Textiles 3.

Introduction to the structures and methods of production of polymers, fibers, yarns and fabrics used in medical applications. Survey of the performance requirements of current medical textiles and healthcare products used in health centers, as surgical implants and as consumer products. Overview of the structure, organization and integration of the medical textile, medical device and pharmaceutical industries within the healthcare sector. Credit not allowed if previous credit for TT 105.

MT 323 Introduction to Theory and Practice of Medical Fiber and Yarn Formation 3.
Prerequisite: (PY 211 or PY 205) and (PCC 203 or CH 221 or CH 225 or TE 200).

Introduction to the manufacture of fibers and filament yarns used in medical textiles. It includes the flow behavior of polymeric materials as it relates to fiber formation. It also includes the application of fiber forming theories to synthetic and biopolymeric fibers used in medical textiles. The common methods of yarn manufacture are introduced.

MT 366 Biotextile Product Development 3.
Prerequisite: (TT 105 or MT 105 or PCC 105), (TE 200 or CH 223 or 227), and TT 327: Co-requisite: TT 305, TT 341, and TT 351.

Overview of the product development process for medical textiles and implantable biotextile devices. FDA classification system for medical and healthcare products. Review steps in identification of healthcare needs, market size and demand, product specifications and design, prototype fabrication and sterilization, in vitro testing of mechanical, chemical, surface and biological properties, in vivo animal testing, regulatory issues, consumer and clinical trials and explant analysis. Examples of medical textiles for personal hygiene, wound care, external support, orthopedic, general surgery, dental and tissue engineering applications.The student will be introduced to the process of new product development as it applies to medical textiles and biotextiles.

MT 381 Medical Textile and the Regulatory Environment 3.
Prerequisite: Junior standing..

The course will focus on the legal and regulatory environment as it impacts the design, manufacture, marketing and distribution of medical textiles and healthcare products. Fundamentals of legal theory, contract law, intellectual property, licensing, product liability and the Food and Drug Administration will be covered, providing the student with the ability to recognize and understand the legal issues involved with the medical textile supply chain.

MT 432 Biotextiles Evaluation 3.
Prerequisite: MT 323 and BIO 183; Corequisite: MT 366 or TE 466..

Evaluation of the performance of biotextiles and medical polymers in biological and microbiological environments, with an emphasis on in vitro and in vivo techniques for testing the biocompatibility and biostability of implantable biomedical products. Related issues will deal with quality assurance systems, inspection and sampling plans, ISO certification, good manufacturing practices, reference materials and organisms, and the use of accelerated tests and animal trials so as to meet regulatory requirements.

MT 471 The Chemistry of Synthetic and Natural Bipolymers 3.
Prerequisite: CH 220 or 221 or 225.

Introduction to natural and synthetic biopolymers used for biomedical applications. Goals and challenges of biomaterials selection for biomedical engineering. Polymer concepts of polymerization and characterization. Sources/synthesis, chemical and physical properties and degradation mechanisms are described. Polymer classes include: polysaccharides, proteins, polyesters, polyurethanes, polyanhydrides and polyethers.

PCC - Polymer and Color Chemistry Courses

PCC 101 Introduction to Polymer and Color Chemistry 2.
Corequisite: PCC 104.

Introduction of topics related to Polymer and Color Chemistry, e.g. fiber and fiber forming polymers, polymerization methods, into to color assessment methods, various chemistry disciplines, molecular interactions, periodic table, acids, bases, solutions, into to and examples of textile coloration and textile finishing techniques.

PCC 104 Introduction to Polymer and Color Chemistry Lab 1.
Corequisite: PCC 101.

An introduction to hands-on laboratory work for the study of basic polymer principles, dye synthesis, forensic analysis and coloration of fibers.

PCC 106 Polymer Chemistry and Environmental Sustainability 3.
Prerequisite: CH 101 or CH 103; Corequisite: CH 221 or CH 225.

Polymers are prevalent in almost every part of our lives. Many polymers are petroleum based and their raw material supply is limited. Using a theme of environmental impact, this course will review the origin and preparation of key industrial raw materials and how they are used in polymer synthesis. Properties of synthetic polymers will be introduces and concepts for establishing sustainable polymers will be discussed.

PCC 203 Introduction to Polymer Chemistry 3.
Prerequisite: CH 101 and (MT 105 or TT 105 or PCC 101).

Organic reaction principles necessary to understand the preparation, properties and chemistry of polymers. Synthesis, applications and behavior of common classes of polymers with emphasis on those materials used in the textile industry. The chemistry and structure of natural and man-made fibers.

PCC 274 Introduction to Forensic Science 3.

The field of forensic science is the application of science to the law. The primary purpose of this course is to introduce students to the 'real world' of forensics. It will serve as a basis for more advanced forensic courses. Solving crimes are often complex and costly affairs, involving myriad science and engineering disciplines, ethics, legal issues, and strong communication skills. These key areas will be introduced via regular course lectures, guest lectures from faculty members within NC State and other institutions, and guest lectures from current or former field agents and professional forensic scientists.

PCC 301 Technology of Dyeing and Finishing 3.
Prerequisite: PCC 106 or PCC 203 or TE 200 and Corequisite: PCC 304.

Basic principles and procedures for the preparation, dyeing, printing, and finishing of natural and man-made fibers. The chemical nature of dyes and fastness properties and the chemical nature of finishes used to impart specific end-use properties.

PCC 302 Technology of Textile Wet Processing 4.
Prerequisite: (TT 105 or MT 105 or PCC 101) and TMS 211 and CH 101 and (PY 211 or PY 205)..

Introduction to the science and technology used in textile wet processing. Topics include preparation, dyeing, printing and finishing of textiles, basics of color generation and measurement. Emphasis mainly on cotton, wool, nylon and polyester. Laboratory includes experiments in wet processing and a project on statistical analysis of fabric defects.

PCC 304 Technology of Dyeing & Finishing Laboratory 1.
Prerequisite: PCC 106 or PCC 203 or TE 200 and Corequisite: PCC 301.

Laboratory experience involving the preparation, dyeing, printing, and finishing of natural and man-made fibers.

PCC 350 Introduction to Color Science and Its Applications 2.
Prerequisite: PCC 301 and either PY 208 or PY 212; Corequisite: PCC 354.

Basic principles and applications of color science. Physical, physiological and psychophysical aspects of color, color perception, color specification, color measurement and color control.

PCC 354 Intro to Color Science Laboratory 1.
Prerequisite: PCC 301 and either PY 208 or PY 212; Corequisite: PCC 350.

An introdiction to hands-on laboratory work for the color measurement and perceotion of colored materials.

PCC 401 Impact of Industry on the Environment and Society 3.
Prerequisite: Junior standing..

Relationship of society to safety and environmental aspects of manufactured products. Quantifying manufacturing risks. Protective methods, e.g. administrative, engineering, personal, treatment, pollution prevention. Social factors, e.g. political, regulatory, legal, consumer attitudes, public policy, perceptions. Understanding complex social issues, especially situations with conflicting goals. Critical comparison of options for risk reduction, and selecting reasonable (hopefully optimal) courses of action in complex and uncertain situations. Unsolved problems of industry and society (e.g. greenhouse effect). Relationships of ethics, laws and regulations to manufacturing.

PCC 402 Introduction to the Theory and Practice of Fiber Formation 3.
Prerequisite: TE 200 and (CH 201 or CH 203) and (PY 208 or PY 212) and (MA 231 or MA 241).

Flow behavior of polymeric materials as related to the formation of fibers by melt, dry and wet extrusion. Elementary theories of drawing and heat setting. Application of fiber-forming theories to synthetic and cellulosic fibers. Offered in Fall only.

PCC 410 Textile Preparation and Finishing Chemistry 3.
Prerequisite: PCC 301.

Topics in textile wet processing. Chemical mechanisms and unit operations in fabric preparation and finishing.

PCC 412 Textile Chemical Analysis 2.
Prerequisite: PCC 301 and (CH 331 or CH 433 or TE 303); Corequisite: PCC 414.

Application of analytical techniques for analysis to fibers, textile chemicals and textile processes; atomic absorption, ultraviolet, visible, near-infrared and infrared spectrophotometer; chromatography; interfacial tension; calorimetric, gravimetric and complexometric analyses. Emphasis on interpretation of data and solving problems of analysis for quantitate and characterization purposes.

PCC 414 Textile Chemistry Analysis Lab 1.
Prerequisite: PCC 301 and (CH 331 or CH 433 or TE 303); Corequisite: PCC 412.

Laboratory course in the application of analytical techniques for analysis of fibers, textile chemicals and textile processes; atomic absorption, ultraviolet, visible, near-infrared and infrared spectrophotometery; chromatography; interfacial tension; calorimetric, gravimetric and complexometric analyses. Emphasis on interpretation of data solving problems of analysis for quantitavive and characterization purposes.

PCC 420 Textile Dyeing and Printing 3.
Prerequisite: PCC 301.

Topics in coloration of textile fibers; chemical and physical mechanisms in textile dyeing and printing.

PCC 442 Theory of Physico-Chemical Processes in Textiles II 3.
Prerequisite: TE 303 or CH 331 or CH 433.

Second semester of a two-semester sequence. Ideal and non-ideal solutions, colligative properties. Electro chemistry, dyeing isotherms, chemical kinetics, surface chemistry, theory of repellency and other special topics.

PCC 461 Chemistry of Polymeric Materials 3.
Prerequisite: (CH 220 and TE 200) or CH 223 or CH 227; Corequisite: PCC 464.

Polymers are a critical component of most products used by society today. Knowledge of their formation and properties is key to development of the materials of the future. The formation and properties of the major polymers are the primary focus areas of this course, including Step-growth and Chain-growth polymerization, formation techniques for preparation of synthetic fibers and the fundamental relationships between chemical structure and physical properties of natural and synthetic polymers.

PCC 462 Characterization and Physical Properties of Polymers 3.
Prerequisite: PCC 461.

Properties unique to polymers are related to their high molecular weight, long and flexible chains, or polymers physics. The detailed molecular structures of polymer, pr polymer chemistry, are characterized and utilized to establish structure-property relations. An inside/outside approach connects their microstructures to their local conformational flexibilities, which impact their global responses, such as sizes and shapes and conformational entropies, to both their environments and the stresses placed upon them.

PCC 464 Chemistry of Polymeric Materials Laboratory 1.
Prerequisite: (CH 220 and TE 200) or CH 223 or CH 227; Corequisite: PCC 461.

Polymers are a critical component of most products used by society today. Understanding their formation and properties is key to development of the materials of tomorrow. This laboratory course is focused on preparation of the major synthetic polymers using step-growth and chain-growth polymerization techniques. The properties of the resultant polymers are studied.

PCC 466 Polymer Chemistry Laboratory 3.
Prerequisite: (CH 331 or TE 303 or CH 433) and Senior Standing.

Synthesis and characterization of polymers; thermodynamics of rubber elasticity and gelation; spectroscopic, thermal and scattering techniques for polymer analysis. The processing of polymers into fibers and films.

PCC 471 The Chemistry of Synthetic and Natural Bipolymers 3.
Prerequisite: CH 220 or 221 or 225.

Introduction to natural and synthetic biopolymers used for biomedical applications. Goals and challenges of biomaterials selection for biomedical engineering. Polymer concepts of polymerization and characterization. Sources/synthesis, chemical and physical properties and degradation mechanisms are described. Polymer classes include: polysaccharides, proteins, polyesters, polyurethanes, polyanhydrides and polyethers.

PCC 474 Forensic Chemistry Laboratory 3.
Prerequisite: (CH 220 or CH 223 or CH 227) and TMS 211.

Forensic chemistry is the application of chemistry to the law. It is a key part of crime scene investigations. In this course, students work in teams and discover standard methods of crime scene processing, latent evidence processing and analysis of materials and chemicals germane to forensic trace evidence. Advanced analytical chemistry techniques will be learned and applied to solve a 'crime' with suspects. Students will attempt to solve the crime and will present their analytical evidence in a courtroom setting with cross-examination.

PCC 490 Undergraduate Research in Polymer and Color Chemistry 1-6.
Prerequisite: PCC 301 and PCC 461/CH 461 and (TE 303 or CH 331 or CH 433)..

Faculty-supervised individual research for undergraduates in PCC. Students must find an advisor from within the department with whom to work on a regular basis. Intended for PCC majors. Individualized/Independent Study and Research courses require a Course Agreement for Students Enrolled in Non-Standard Courses be completed by the student and faculty member prior to registration by the department.

PCC 491 Seminar in Polymer and Color Chemistry 1.
Prerequisite: Senior standing.

Familiarizes student with the principal sources of polymer and color chemistry literature and emphasizes importance of keeping abreat of developments in the field. Emphasizes fundamentals of technical writing. Arranged. Intended for PCC majors3.

PCC 492 Special Topics in Polymer and Color Chemistry 3.

Presentation of material not normally available in regular course offerings or offering of new courses on a trial basis. Credits and content determined by faculty member in consultation with the Department Head.

T - Textiles Courses

T 101 Introduction to the College of Textiles 1.

Introduction topics related to the College of Textiles, the textile industry, all textile curricula, advising, academic skills, team work, research and personnel involved in the college. Students will not receive credit for both USC 301 and T 101.

T 102 Introduction to Product Evolution 2.

Students explore the new product development (NPD) process through analysis of case studies of how textile products are designed and developed for a variety of sectors of our economy, including automotive, medical, industrial, furniture, and clothing. Students develop critical thinking skills as they read a variety of texts and respond using several forms of writing techniques.

T 200 Introduction to Textiles 3.

Survey of textiles including technical and economic history of the industry; physical and chemical processes involved in producing textile products from raw materials; unique aesthetic, physical and chemical properties of textiles and how these properties are determined by raw materials and production processes; and influence of properties of textile materials on their utilization and performance. Not open to students required to take TT 105; open to transfer students.

T 491 Honors Seminar in Textiles 1.
Prerequisite: By invitation into Honors Program in Textiles.

A seminar on current university and industrial research in the field of textiles.

T 493 Industrial Internship in Textiles 3.
Prerequisite: Textile core courses.

Paid professional-level work experience in textiles, relating academic training in science and technology to industrial practice under professional guidance. Written and final oral presentation used for grading. Limited to three hours per student. Individualized/Independent Study and Research courses require a Course Agreement for Students Enrolled in Non-Standard Courses be completed by the student and faculty member prior to registration by the department.

T 495 International Collaboration in Textiles Research 1-6.
Prerequisite: GPA of 2.75 or better and JR standing.

Directed undergraduate research in Textiles and/or Apparel related areas that requires collaboration with students at an institution abroad. The research project is structured as an international team project in an applied field that allows students in different countries to work together using various communication tools. Students shall arrange international contacts and provide a written proposal of the project to the undergraduate administrator or course coordinator prior to registration. Individualized/Independent Study and Research courses require a Course Agreement for Students Enrolled in Non-Standard Courses be completed by the student and faculty member prior to registration by the department.

T 497 Independent Research in Textile Engineering, Chemistry and Materials Science I 1-3.
Prerequisite: Junior standing in TECS; 2.8 GPA.

Independent research in Textile Engineering, Chemistry and Materials Science topics through experimental, theoretical and literature studies. Written and oral reports required. Individualized/Independent Study and Research courses require a Course Agreement for Students Enrolled in Non-Standard Courses be completed by the student and faculty member prior to registration by the department.

T 498 Independent Research in Textile Engineering, Chemistry and Materials Science II 1-3.
Prerequisite: T 497.

Independent research in Textile Engineering, Chemistry and Materials Science topics through experimental, theoretical and literature studies. Written and oral reports required. Individualized/Independent Study and Research courses require a Course Agreement for Students Enrolled in Non-Standard Courses be completed by the student and faculty member prior to registration by the department.

TE - Textile Engineering Courses

TE 105 Textile Engineering: Materials and Systems 2.
Corequisite: CH 101.

Introducation to textile engineering, polymers and fibers with emphasis on applications. Discussions of what makes macromolecules unique and pairing of material properties to a given application. Other discussions by various TE faculty giving students a picture of the breadth of the program. This course will also help develop leadership/team work skills and oral/written communications.

TE 110 Computer-Based Modeling for Engineers 3.
Prerequisite: E 115, Corequisite: MA 141.

Introductory course in computer-based modeling and programming using Visual Basic for Applications. Emphasis on algorithm development and engineering problem solving. Methodical development of VBA within applications like Microsoft Excel and Access from specifications; documentation, style; control structures; classes and methods; data types and data abstraction; object-oriented programming and design; graphical user interface design. Projects: design problems from electrical, industrial, textile, and financial systems. Functional relationships will be given and programs will be designed and developed from a list of specifications.

TE 200 Introduction to Polymer Science and Engineering 3.
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better CH 101.

Science and engineering of large molecules. Correlation of molecular structure and properties of polymers in solution and in bulk. Introductory polymer synthesis and kinetics. Analysis of physical methods for characterization of molecular weight, morphology, rheology, and mechanical behavior. The content will be focused on polymer synthesis, structure, and properties. The course will focus on a thorough understanding of polymer concepts and definitions, equations to calculate properties, and equipment used to measure properties.

TE 201 Textile Engineering Science 4.
Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in MA 241, PY 205; and Corequisite: TE/ISE 110.

Structure, physical and mechanical properties of fibers; structure of assemblies. Structure/property relations. Laboratory exercises in characterization of fiber properties.

TE 205 Analog and Digital Circuits 4.
Prerequisite: C- or better in TE 110, PY 208, Corequisite: MA 341.

Fundamentals of analog and digital circuit analysis and design. The course will present the systematic analysis and design of AC and DC circuits using Ohms and Kirchhoff's laws, the node voltage method, Thevenin and Norton's theorem, Laplace Transforms, resistance, capacitance, inductance, operational amplifiers, and frequency response. Next, the design of combinatorial and synchronous sequential circuit design will be covered using Karnaugh maps, laws of Boolean algebra, flip-flops, state machines, and latches. Laboratory exercises will supplement the topics presented in class.

TE 301 Engineering Textile Structures I: Linear Assemblies 3.
Prerequisite: (MAE 206 or CE 214) and MA 242.

Engineering analysis of textile structures, especially yarns. Unit processes of production, handling and packaging. Production sequences, intermachine effects, machine design and their consequences on the textile product.

TE 302 Textile Manufacturing Processes and Systems II 4.
Prerequisite: TE 301 and C- or better in TE/ISE 110.

Mechanisms used in the production of woven, knitted and nonwoven fabrics. Design and operation of these mechanisms and their impact on the fabric. System dynamics of the different fabric forming processes.

TE 303 Thermodynamics for Textile Engineers 3.
Prerequisite: MA 242, PY 208.

Introduction to the concept of energy and the laws governing the transfer and transformation of energy with an emphasis on thermodynamic properties and the First and Second Laws of Thermodynamics. The fundamentals of thermodynamics will be emphasized, although more applied examples and problems will be heavily utilized.

TE 401 Textile Engineering Design I 4.
Prerequisite: TE 302.

The design process including initial specification, design constraints, sources of information and design strategy. Development of fact-finding ability in areas unfamiliar to the student. Analysis of existing designs and the development of improved or new designs.

TE 402 Textile Engineering Design II 4.
Prerequisite: TE 401.

Application of textile engineering principles using team approach to design, construct and analyze novel engineering solutions to textile industry problems. Evaluation of design to assess the impact on worker, industry and society.

TE 404 Textile Engineering Quality Improvement 3.
Prerequisite: ST 370 and C- or better in TE/ISE 110.

Defining and quantifying quality of textile products; quality improvement using statistical process control (SPC) and design of experiment (DOE) techniques.

TE 424 Textile Engineering Quality Improvement Laboratory 1.
Corequisite: TE 404.

Application of process improvement methods to textile systems using statistical software. Laboratory supplements lecture material presented in TE 404.

TE 435 Process Systems Analysis and Control 3.
Prerequisite: (MA 341 and TE 205) or CHE 312.

Dynamic analysis and continuous control of chemical and material engineering processes. Process modeling; stability analysis, design and selection of control schemes. Solution of differential equations using Laplace transform techniques.

TE 440 Textile Information Systems Design 4.
Prerequisite: C- or better in TE/ISE 110 and JR standing.

Textile information system design, real-world constraints. Principles of hardware, software, security and ethics issues. Emphasis on solving a real world problem. Credit will not be given for both TE 440 and TE 540.

TE 463 Polymer Engineering 3.
Prerequisite: MSE 201 or BME 203; and Corequisite: TE 303, MAE 301, or MSE 301.

Chemical and physical properties of polymers and fibers; thermodynamics of crystallization, time dependent phenomena, fracture mechanics and rheology. Advanced topics in extrusion.

TE 466 Polymeric Biomaterials Engineering 3.
Prerequisite: PY 208 and (TE 200 or CH 220 or CH 221 or CH 225) and (MAE 206 or CE 214).

In-depth study of the engineering design of biomedical polymers and implants. Polymeric biomaterials, including polymer synthesis and structure, polymer properties as related to designing orthopedic and vascular grafts. Designing textile products as biomaterials including surface modification and characterization techniques. Bioresorbable polymers.

TE 467 Mechanics of Tissues & Implants Requirements 3.
Prerequisite: (ZO 160 or BIO 183) and (MAE 314 or CE 313).

Application of engineering and biological principles to understand the structure and performance of tendons, ligaments, skin, and bone; bone mechanics; viscoelasticity of soft biological tissues; models of soft biological tissues; mechanics of skeletal muscle; and tissue-derived devices as well as interfaces between native tissues and synthetic devices.

TE 492 Special Topics in Textile Engineering 1-3.

Presentation of material not normally available in regular course offerings or offering of new courses on a trial basis. Credits and content determined by faculty member in consultation with the Department Head.

TE 505 Textile Systems and Control 3.
Prerequisite: TE 305, CSC 114.

Theory and application of instruments and control systems used in modern textile plants. Description of basic instruments and computer systems along with their use in process control, production control, research and development.

TE 533 Lean Six Sigma Quality 3.
Prerequisite: ST 361 and ST 371, or equivalent.

Systematic approach (Lean Six Sigma philosophy) for improving products and processes. Defining the improvement opportunity, measurement system analysis, data collection, statistical analysis, design of experiment (DOE) methods, and statistical process control (SPC) methods. Application of Lean Six sigma methods to improve product or process.

TE 540 Textile Information Systems Design 4.
Prerequisite: Introductory Programming Course.

Textile information system design, real-world constraints. Principles of hardware, software, security and ethics issues. Emphasis on solving a real world problem. Credit will not be given for both TE 440 and TE 540.

TE 550 Clothing Comfort and Personal Protection Science 3.
R: Graduate Standing or Permission of Instructor.

The course presents scientific principles for characterization and development of comfortable and/or protective textiles and clothing. Properties associated with human tactile response, thermal comfort and heat stress are emphasized. Inherent issues of balancing comfort versus protection are illustrated by research studies on performance garments or protective clothing systems. Methods and standards for evaluating comfort and protective performance range from bench level instruments to system level tests for ensembles using instrumented manikins, human clothing wear trials, and physiological tests.

TE 551 Human Physiology for Clothing and Wearables 3.
R: Graduate Standing or Permission of Instructor.

This course addresses key principles involved in the interaction between textiles and the human being: basic anatomy and physiology, individual differences, heat balance and ergonomics. Effects of climate and clothing systems on physiology and ability to perform work, and thermal strain of active, clothed humans will be the focus. Students will conduct thermal analysis of human heat balance, including the influence of clothing. Measurements techniques related to exercise physiology, and application of sensors and instruments systems will be discussed.

TE 562 Simulation Modeling 3.

This course concentrates on design, construction, and use of discrete/continuous simulation object-based models employing the SIMIO software, with application to manufacturing, service, and healthcare. The focus is on methods for modeling and analyzing complex problems using simulation objects. Analysis includes data-based modeling, process design, input modeling, output analysis, and the use of 3D animation with other graphical displays. Object-oriented modeling is used to extend models and enhance re-usability.

TE 565 Textile Composites 3.
Prerequisite: MA 341, MAE 206.

Fiber architecture of textiles used for composites. Manufacturing processes and geometric quantification. Basic analysis for predicting elastic properties. Interrelationship of elastic properties and geometric quantities. Failure criteria for these materials.

TE 566 Polymeric Biomaterials Engineering 3.
Prerequisite: PY 208 and (TE 200 or CH 220 or CH 221 or CH 225) and (MAE 206 or CE 214).

In-depth study of the engineering design of biomedical polymers and implants. Polymeric biomaterials, including polymer synthesis and structure, polymer properties as related to designing orthopedic and vascular grafts. Designing textile products as biomaterials including surface modification and characterization techniques. Bioresorbable polymers.

TE 570 Polymer Physics 3.

Polymer microstructures, polymer solutions, polymer physical states (including amorphous polymers, crystalline polymers, polymer melts, melting of polymers, glass-transition, and other transitions), polymer blends, polymer mechanical properties, polymer viscoelasticity and flow, multicomponent polymer systems, and modern polymer topics. The physics of polymer fibers. Graduate standing or permission of instructor.

TE 589 Special Studies In Textile Engineering and Science 1-4.
Prerequisite: Senior standing or Graduate standing.

New or special course on developments in textile engineering and science. Specific topics and prerequisites identified vary. Generally used for first offering of a new course.

TE 601 Seminar 1.

TE 630 Independent Study 1-3.

TE 676 Special Projects 1-3.

TE 685 Master's Supervised Teaching 1-3.
Prerequisite: Master's student.

Teaching experience under the mentorship of faculty who assist the student in planning for the teaching assignment, observe and provide feedback to the student during the teaching assignment, and evaluate the student upon completion of the assignment.

TE 690 Master's Examination 1-9.
Prerequisite: Master's student.

For students in non thesis master's programs who have completed all other requirements of the degree except preparing for and taking the final master's exam.

TE 693 Master's Supervised Research 1-9.
Prerequisite: Master's student.

Instruction in research and research under the mentorship of a member of the Graduate Faculty.

TE 695 Master's Thesis Research 1-9.
Prerequisite: Master's student.

Thesis Research.

TE 696 Summer Thesis Research 1.
Prerequisite: Master's student.

For graduate students whose programs of work specify no formal course work during a summer session and who will be devoting full time to thesis research.

TE 699 Master's Thesis Preparation 1-9.
Prerequisite: Master's student.

For students who have completed all credit hour requirements and full-time enrollment for the master's degree and are writing and defending their thesis. Credits arranged.

TMS - Textile Materials Science Courses

TMS 211 Introduction to Fiber Science 3.
Prerequisite: MT 105 or TT 105 or PCC 101; Corequisite: MA 131 or MA 141.

Properties of fibers related to type and chemical structure. Fiber classification and identification. Reaction to moisture, stress-strain properties, and methods of measuring physical properties. Relationship between polymer structure, fiber properties and utilization.

TMS 212 Yarn and Fabric Formation and Properties 2.
Prerequisite: TMS 211.

The development of products from textile and fibrous materials is a critical component of new product development in many industries, including textiles, retail, plastics, composites, transporations, and architecture. This course provides the technical information required for scientists to understand how textile and fiber-based products are manufactures, with a practical view to cmbining the new knowledge with a molucular level understanding of fibers for unique new product development.

TMS 214 Yarn and Fabric Formation and Properties Lab 1.
Prerequisite: TMS 212.

The development of products from textiles and fibrous materials is a critical component of new product development in many industry. This laboratory course provides hands-on exercises and demonstrations of key textile and fiber-based products are manufactured.

TMS 492 Special Topics in Textile Materials Science 1-3.

Presentation of material not normally available in regular course offerings or offering of new courses on a trial basis. Credits and content determined by faculty member in consultation with the Department Head.

TMS 500 Fiber and Polymer Microscopy 3.
Prerequisite: MA 242, PY 208, TC 203.

Art and science of light and electron microscopy; theoretical and practical aspects of visibility, resolution and contrast. Laboratory practice in assembling, testing and using various microscopes and accessories in analyzing, describing and identifying unoriented and oriented crystalline or amorphous materials. Laboratory emphasis on study of fibers and polymers through transmission microscopy with polarized light.

TMS 521 Filament Yarn Production Processing and Properties 3.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or PBS status.

Structure, properties and processes for manufacturing and treating continuous filament yarns. Response of fibers to elevated temperatures, twist, false twist and various bulking processes. Yarn structures and properties required for stretch and molded fabrics. Independent laboratory and critical literature review in general area of filament yarn processing, properties and test methods. credit not allowed for both TT 521 and TT 425.

TMS 565 Textile Composites 3.
Prerequisite: MA 341, MAE 206.

Fiber architecture of textiles used for composites. Manufacturing processes and geometric quantification. Basic analysis for predicting elastic properties. Interrelationship of elastic properties and geometric quantities. Failure criteria for these materials.

TMS 589 Special Studies In Textile Engineering and Science 1-4.
Prerequisite: Senior standing or Graduate standing.

New or special course on developments in textile engineering and science. Specific topics and prerequisites identified vary. Generally used for first offering of a new course.

TMS 676 Special Projects 1-3.

TMS 685 Master's Supervised Teaching 1-3.
Prerequisite: Master's student.

Teaching experience under the mentorship of faculty who assist the student in planning for the teaching assignment, observe and provide feedback to the student during the teaching assignment, and evaluate the student upon completion of the assignment.

TMS 690 Master's Exam 1-9.
Prerequisite: Master's student.

For students in non thesis master's programs who have completed all other requirements of the degree except preparing for and taking the final master's exam.

TMS 693 Master's Supervised Research 1-9.
Prerequisite: Master's student.

Instruction in research and research under the mentorship of a member of the Graduate Faculty.

TMS 695 Master's Thesis Research 1-9.
Prerequisite: Master's student.

Thesis research.

TMS 696 Summer Thesis Research 1.
Prerequisite: Master's student.

For graduate students whose programs of work specify no formal course work during a summer session and who will be devoting full time to thesis research.

TMS 699 Master's Thesis Preparation 1-9.
Prerequisite: Master's student.

For students who have completed all credit hour requirements and full-time enrollment for the master's degree and are writing and defending their theses.

TMS 761 Mechanical and Rheological Properties Of Fibrous Material 3.
Prerequisite: MA 301.

In-depth study of the stress-strain, bending, torsional, dynamic and rheological behavior of natural and man-made fibers. Presentation and discussion of theoretical relations and advanced techniques.

TMS 762 Physical Properties Of Fiber Forming Polymers, Fibers and Fibrous Structures 3.
Prerequisite: PY 208.

Experimental results and theoretical considerations of physical properties of fibers and fiber-forming polymers. Electrical, thermal, optical, frictional and moisture properties of these materials. Influence of chemical and molecular fine structure on these properties.

TMS 763 Characterization Of Structure Of Fiber Forming Polymers 3.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Theories, experimental evidence and characterization methods of the molecular fine structure of fiber forming polymers in the solid state. Characterization methods include X-ray diffraction, microscopy, infrared, thermal and magnetic resonance.

TT - Textile Technology Courses

TT 105 Introduction to Textile Technology 3.

Introduction to Textile and Apparel, Technology and Management. Structures and production methods for fabrics, yarn, and fibers. Introduction to the nature of polymers and the characteristics of polymers which make them useful for producing fibersthat are practically and aesthetically desirable. Design of end products as well as fundamental economic and supply chain issues.

TT 221 Yarn Production and Properties I 2.
Prerequisite: TT 105 or MT 105; Corequisite: MA 131 or MA 141.

The techniques available for manufacturing yarns from staple fibers. A review of yarn numbering and fiber properties. The principles involved in opening, cleaning, blending, drafting, twisting and winding. Short and long staple spinning systems including a review of opening and cleaning lines, carding, draw frames, roving frames and different spinning machines. Filament yarn processing.

TT 252 Formation and Structure of Textile Fabrics 4.
Prerequisite: TT 221.

Fundamentals of the conversion of fibers and yarns into woven, knitted, and nonwoven fabrics, and fabrics' conversion systems. Introduction to woven, knitted and nonwoven fabric design structure. Structure, property, and performance relations of textile fabrics. Testing and evaluation of textile structures.

TT 305 Introduction to Nonwoven Products and Processes 3.
Prerequisite: TMS 211 and (MA 131 or MA 141) and (PY 211 or PY 205); Corequisite: (ST 311 or BUS 350 or ST 361 or ST 370).

Fiber web/nonwoven fabrics produced directly from fibers or their precursors. Physical and chemical nature of local bonding and fiber entanglement. Viable processes for producing these fabrics. Economic justification for process and production. Product/process interaction. Plant visits whenever possible.

TT 321 Yarn Production and Properties II 3.
Prerequisite: TT 221.

Fiber and machine interactions in blending, carding, drawing and spinning. Drafting theories and the influence of fiber and machine variables on irregularity. The role of twist on yarn structure, properties and productivity. Developments and limitations in processing technology.

TT 327 Yarn Production and Properties 4.
Prerequisite: TMS 211 and (MA 231 or MA 241); Co-requisite: PY 212.

The processing of natural and man-made, fibers and filaments into yarns. The impact of fiber selection and processing parameters on the quality of the yarn and subsequent products. Major processing routes for staple fibers and filaments together with recent developments in applicable technologies.

TT 331 Performance Evaluation of Textile Materials 4.
Prerequisite: (ST 311 or BUS 350 or ST 361 or ST 370) and TMS 211 and (TT 221 or TT 327) and (PY 211or PY 205) and (MA 231 or MA 241); Corequisite: TT 252 or (TT 341 and TT 351)..

Standards, principles and effects of test conditions in measuring basic physical and mechanical properties of textile materials. Design of test and interpretation of test results in relation to end-use performance, product development, process control, research and development and other requirements.

TT 341 Knitted Fabric Technology 3.
Prerequisite: TT 221 or TT 327.

Review of knitted fabric production techniques. Technology of more advanced weft and warp knitting. Jersey and rib fabric modification techniques, yarn knitability and productivity, yarns, creels, patterning and machinery developments, manufacture and properties of warp knit fabrics such as mesh, laid-in, weft insertion and plush. Quality measures, measurement and standards, defects and problem solving. Management of knitting operations.

TT 351 Woven Products and Processes 3.
Prerequisite: (TT 221 or TT 327) and (PY 212 or PY 208).

Design and development of various woven textile products including their component properties, performance, requirements, structures, and methods of production. The primary objective of the course is to introduce students to various woven textile products, including those used in automotives, agriculture, construction, ETC. and stimulate understanding of their structure, performance requirements, and relevant manufacturing principles including braiding.

TT 371 Woven Textile Design 3.
Prerequisite: TT 252.

Design and production of woven fabrics. Exploration of various basic structures, color and textural effects. Development of design abilities through hand-production methods, including an introduction to Computer-integrated Design systems and an awareness of industrial processes.

TT 372 Knitted Textile Design 3.
Prerequisite: TT 252.

Design and production of hand- and machine-knitted fabrics. Exploration of basic structures, color and textural effects. Development of design abilities through hand- and machine-production methods, including an introduction to Computer-integratedDesign Systems and an awareness of industrial processes.

TT 380 Management and Control of Textile and Apparel Systems 3.
Prerequisite: FTM 217; Corequisite: TT 221 or TT 327.

Management approaches, practices and basic economic considerations in the development, production and distribution of industrial and consumer textile and apparel products.

TT 401 Textile Technology Senior Design I 4.
Prerequisite: TT 331, Senior standing.

This is Part 1 of 2 for the Senior Capstone Design Course. Students work in cross-functional teams to research and solve real-world problems in fibers, polymers, and textile science utilizing their foundation skills in Textile Technology. TT 401 and TT 402 must be taken in the same academic year as the class is project and team dependent. Students will be required to meet outside the normal class times as well as expected to participate in various off-campus field trips and activities for successful completion of the project. Project sponsors will cover any transportation costs that are incurred.TT majors only.

TT 402 Textile Technology Senior Design II 4.
Prerequisite: TT 401.

This is Part 2 of 2 for the Senior Capstone Design Course. Students work in cross-functional teams to research and solve real-world problems in fibers, polymers, and textile science utilizing their foundation skills in Textile Technology. TT 401 and TT 402 must be taken in the same academic year as the class is project and team dependent. Students will be required to meet outside the normal class times as well as expected to participate in various off-campus field trips and activities for successful completion of the project. Project sponsors will cover any transportation costs that are incurred.TT majors only.

TT 405 Advanced Nonwovens Processing 3.
Prerequisite: MA 241, PY 208, TT 305.

Mechanisms used in the production of nonwoven materials. Design and operation of these mechanisms. Process flow, optimization of process parameters, influence of process parameters on product properties.

TT 406 Bonding Fundamentals in Nonwovens 3.
Prerequisite: TT 405, MAE 308, MAE 310.

Fundamentals of fluid mechanics and heat transfer mechanisms during the bonding of nonwovens. In-depth description of hydroentangling, thermal bonding and needle punching techniques. Modeling methods and laboratory work are assigned.

TT 407 Characterization Methods in Nonwovens 3.
Prerequisite: ST 361 or ST 370; Corequisite: TT 405.

Fundamentals of methods used in evaluating properties and performance of nonwovens. Assessment of thermal, mechanical, moisture transport and barrier properties of nonwovens. Reliability and interpretation of test results.

TT 408 Nonwoven Product Development 3.
Prerequisite: TT 407.

Fundamentals of nonwoven product development. In-depth knowledge of the materials, processes and nonwovens products. Design of a set of experiments intended for product development. Students work in teams to design, fabricate and evaluate nonwoven products.

TT 425 Textured Yarn Production and Properties 3.
Prerequisite: TT 331.

Structure and properties of continuous filament yarns. Examine response to elevated temperature and variables for texturing methods of producing bulked, textured and torqued yarns. Testing of yarn behaviors and discussion of problems encountered during processing.

TT 431 Quality Management and Control In Textile Manufacturing 3.
Prerequisite: TT 331.

Principles of quality and process management and control in textile/apparel manufacturing with emphases in quality management systems, quality costs, statistical control chart procedures, process capability, acceptance sampling, and optimal process and product design and improvement methods.

TT 451 Advanced Woven Fabric Design 3.
Prerequisite: (TT 252 or TT 351) and Senior Standing.

Design and production requirements for highly specialized woven fabric structures. The laboratory activities will include a project on design from concept to final production and finishing.

TT 470 Jacquard Woven Fabric Design 3.
Prerequisite: TT 252, TT 371.

This course is dedicated to the study of Jacquard woven fabric design and structural technology through the use of CAD as both an aesthetic and technical tool, and will culminate in each student producing a unique fabric collection based upon his/her developed area of interest. Jacquard design for many different end uses is addressed, from art fabrics to unique specialty products. A field trip in this course will require personal transportation.

TT 480 Operations Management Decisions for Textiles 3.
Prerequisite: FTM 380, ACC 210, ST 361, (MA 131 and 132 or MA 141).

Quantitative techniques for decision making and management in the textile complex. Applications include vendor selection, plant location, retail inventory management, forcasting demand, project management, and logistics planning. Techniques covered include simulation, PERT/CPM, mathematical modeling.

TT 481 Design and Technology of Technical Textiles 3.
Prerequisite: TT 305, TT 341 and TT 351.

Performance requirements of various technical textiles. Underlying principles of design, application, manufacture, and evaluation of fibrous structures intended to meet specific end-use requirement.

TT 485 Textile Computer Integrated Enterprise 3.
Prerequisite: TT/FTM 380.

Survey of information technology in textile and apparel industries. Topics discussed include: computer aided design (CAD); computer aided manufacturing (CAM); computer aided engineering (CAE); material handling systems; automation and robotics; logistics and warehousing systems; retail product tracking, and Internet resources.

TT 486 Supply Chain Management in the Textile Industry 3.
Prerequisite: TT/FTM 380.

Study of the operations necessary to produce and distribute a product, starting with the procurement of the raw material used in making the goods and ending with the delivery of the finished product. Topics covered include approaches to solving problems in manufacturing, sourcing, transportation logistics, and retail operations within the Integrated Textile Complex. Credit cannot be given for both TAM486 and MT386.

TT 499 Textile Senior Project 4.
Prerequisite: Senior standing.

This is a project based course to be taken in the last semester of the Senior year. In this capstone course the students work in cross-functional teams to research and solve applied problems in textile related fields. The results of the projects will be presented formally at the end of the semester. Course should be taken in the last semester of the Senior year. It cannot be substituted by other project courses.

TT 500 Understanding the Textile Complex 3.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

This course provides an overview of product development, processing, managing, financing, etc., for the textile industry. It is designed to give new graduate students basic preparations for more advanced, required textile courses. Students will also gain insight into the research being conducted within the College of Textiles.

TT 503 Materials, Polymers, and Fibers used in Nonwovens 3.
Prerequisite: MA 141, PY 205, PCC 203.

Fundamentals of raw material used in nonwoven processes. Raw material production, chemical and physical properties of nonwoven raw materials and assessment of material properties. Introduction of structure/property relationships for these materials and how these relationships influence end use applications.

TT 504 Introduction to Nonwovens Processes and Products 3.
Prerequisite: MA 141; PY 205, Corequisite: TT503.

Fiber web/nonwoven fabrics produced directly from fibers or their precursors. Physical and chemical nature of local bonding and fiber entanglement. Viable process for producing these fabrics. Economic justification for process and production. Product/process interaction. Plant visits whenever possible.

TT 505 Advanced Nonwovens Processing 3.
Prerequisite: TT/NW503, TT/NW504.

Mechanisms used in the production of nonwoven materials. Design and operation of these mechanisms. Process flow, optimization of process parameters, influence of process parameters on product properties.

TT 507 Nonwoven Characterization Methods 3.
Prerequisite: ST 361, Corequisite: TT/NW 505.

Fundamentals of methods used in evaluating properties and performance of nonwovens. Assessment of thermal, mechanical, moisture transport and barrier properties of nonwovens. Reliability and interpretation of test results.

TT 508 Nonwoven Product Development 3.
Prerequisite: TTNW505, TT/NW507.

Fundamentals of nonwoven product development. In-depth knowledge of the materials, processes and nonwovens products. Design of a set of experiments intended for product development. Students work in teams to design, fabricate and evaluate nonwoven products.

TT 520 Yarn Processing Dynamics 3.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or PBS status.

Principles and practice involved in modern yarn and manufacture; including machine-fiber interactions occurring during different processing stages. Not normally for credit for undergraduate textile majors.

TT 521 Filament Yarn Production Processing and Properties 3.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or PBS status.

Structure, properties and processes for manufacturing and treating continuous filament yarns. Response of fibers to elevated temperatures, twist, false twist and various bulking processes. Yarn structures and properties required for stretch and molded fabrics. Independent laboratory and critical literature review in general area of filament yarn processing, properties and test methods. credit not allowed for both TT 521 and TT 425.

TT 530 Textile Quality and Process Control 3.
Prerequisite: TT 420, Corequisite: ST 511 or ST 515.

Quality control and improvement methods for textile processes and products including quality systems, statistical control chart procedures, process capabilities, acceptance sampling plans, textiles process and product designs, on-line and off-line control systems and specific quality factors governing textile products and processes and their variabilities.

TT 532 Evaluation of Biotextiles 3.
Prerequisite: ZO 160, TC 203, TMS 211, CH 220.

Evaluation of the performance of biotextiles and medical polymers in biological and microbiological environments, with an emphasis on "in vitro" and "in vivo" techniques for testing the biocompatibility and biostability of implantable biomedical products. Related issues will deal with quality assurance systems, inspection and sampling plans, ISO certification, GMP's, reference materials and organisms, and the use of accelerated tests an animal trials so as to meet regulatory requirements.

TT 533 Lean Six Sigma Quality 3.
Prerequisite: ST 361 and ST 371, or equivalent.

Systematic approach (Lean Six Sigma philosophy) for improving products and processes. Defining the improvement opportunity, measurement system analysis, data collection, statistical analysis, design of experiment (DOE) methods, and statistical process control (SPC) methods. Application of Lean Six sigma methods to improve product or process.

TT 535 Research Methods and Management 3.
Prerequisite: ST 361, Graduate standing.

Basic principles and methods of academic and industrial research, research ethics, search of knowledge bases, research hypothesis, scientific paradigm, theory development, optimal research design and execution of scientific experiments, regression methods, survey design, use of variance components for samping scheme, model building and validation, principles of industrial R&D, project design and management, intellectual property rights, and maximization of research output.

TT 549 Warp Knit Engineering and Structural Design 3.
Prerequisite: TT 443.

Engineering analysis of tricot and raschel machinery. Design of yarn let-off and fabric take-up mechanisms. Studies of fabric production techniques and quality control systems. Theory of production optimization and the properties of fabrics. Complexgeometrical loop models and their application.

TT 550 Production Mechanics and Properties of Woven Fabrics 3.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or PBS status.

Interrelation between mechanics of production and mechanical properties of woven fabric; unit operations required to prepare yarns for weaving and the mechanism employed in weaving; fabric structure, geometry and mechanical properties; designing forspecific fabrics properties. Not normally for credit for undergraduate textiles majors.

TT 551 Advanced Woven Fabric Design 3.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Design and production requirements for highly specialized woven fabric structures. The laboratory activities will include a project on design from concept to final production and finishing.

TT 553 Formation and Structure of Woven and Knitted Fabrics 3.

The interrelation between the mechanics of production and mechanical properties of woven and knitted fabrics; unit operations required to prepare yams for weaving and knitting and mechanisms employed in weaving and knitting; fabric structure, geometry and mechanical properties; designing for specific fabric properties. Students will not be allowed credit for TT 553 and (TT 541, TT 549, and TT 550).

TT 570 Textile Digital Design and Technology 3.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

This course focuses on design of textile products balancing industry and creative foci. Students will study a range of industry focused technologies and techniques essential to creation of textile products in a technology intensive environment. Basics of textile product design and relevant technologies will be covered along with methods and techniques to improve commercial textile product design process. Students will research in-depth a topic related to textile product design, and present their research in an oral format.

TT 571 Professional Practices in Textile Design and Technology 3.
Prerequisite: TT 570.

This course builds on the concepts introduced in TT 570 with increased focus on professional practice and methods. Focus on advanced textile product design topics incorporating an industry focus and utilizing commercial technologies. Students willinvestigate in depth a textile product design industry application, technique or method of interest using individual and tam based strategies. Topics include advanced study of textile product design concepts, techniques and preparation for professional competitions, displays and conferences.

TT 581 Technical Textiles 3.
Prerequisite: TT 520 or TT 521, and TT 550.

Performance requirements of various technical textiles. Underlying principles of design and manufacturing of fibrous structures to meet specific needs in mechanical and other behaviors.

TT 591 Special Studies in Textile Technology 1-4.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or PBS status.

Special Studies in Textile Technology to fulfill needs not covered by current offering. Student and faculty required to submit topics to be covered to director of graduate programs within first week of semester.

TT 601 Seminar 1.

Discussion of scientific articles of interest to the textile industry; review and discussion of student papers and research problems.

TT 630 Independent Study in Textile Technology 1-3.

Problems of specific interest in textile technology. Preparation of report, in format suitable for publication required. One-page outline signed by advisor must be submitted to director of graduate programs within first week of semester. A maximumof 3 credit hours will be allowed towards Master of Textiles Degree. No credit is allowed towards MS (Textiles).

TT 676 Special Projects Textile Technology 1-3.

TT 685 Master's Supervised Teaching 1-3.
Prerequisite: Master's student.

Teaching experience under the mentorship of faculty who assist the student in planning for the teaching assignment, observe and provide feedback to the student during the teaching assignment and evaluate the student upon completion of the assignment.

TT 690 Master's Examination 1-9.
Prerequisite: Master's student.

For students in non thesis master's programs who have completed all other requirements of the degree except preparing for and taking the final master's exam.

TT 693 Master's Supervised Research 1-9.
Prerequisite: Master's student.

Instruction in research and research under the mentorship of a member of the Graduate Faculty.

TT 695 Master's Thesis Research 1-9.
Prerequisite: Master's student.

Thesis Research.

TT 696 Summer Thesis Research 1.
Prerequisite: Master's student.

For graduate students whose programs of work specify no formal course work during a summer session and who will be devoting full time to thesis research.

TT 699 Master's Thesis Preparation 1-9.
Prerequisite: Master's student.

For students who have completed all credit hour requirements and full-time enrollment for the master's degree and are writing and defending their thesis.

TT 896 Summer Dissert Res 1.