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Biological Sciences (BIO)

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  • BIO - Biological Sciences Courses

    BIO 105 Biology in the Modern World 3.
    Credit is not allowed for BIO 105 and BIO 181 or BIO 125..

    Principles and concepts of biology including cellular structure and function, metabolism and energy transformation, homeostasis, reproduction, heredity, diversity of life, ecology, evolution and animal behavior. Emphasis on human affairs and human examples. For non-science students. Students may not receive credit for both BIO 105 and (BIO 115 or BIO 181 or BIO 183).

    BIO 106 Biology in the Modern World Laboratory 1.
    Corequisite: BIO 105.

    Laboratory experience in biological principles to complement BIO 105. For non-science students. Students may not receive credit for both BIO 106 and (BIO 116, BIO 181 or BIO 183).

    BIO 140 Survey of Animal Diversity 3.

    Classification and phylogeny of animals; patterns of diversification in body design and relationship between body design and the environment; study of selected animal assemblages. Students may not receive credit for both BIO 140 and BIO 350 or BIO 402 or BIO 403 or ZO 150.

    BIO 141 Animal Diversity Laboratory 1.
    Prerequisite: BIO 140.

    Observation of living animals, dissections of preserved specimens, and microscopy; emphasis on classification of animals, patterns of diversification in body design, and relationship between body design and the environment. Students may not receive credit for both BIO 141 and BIO 350 or BIO 402 or BIO 403 or ZO 150.

    BIO 165 Introduction to Environmental Research 5.

    Introduction to environmental research is a hands-on learning experience for incoming freshmen interested in pursuing scientific research. The course introduces students to scientific methods and research through active participation in research on an environmental problem involving chemicals of environmental concern. Students will explore a topic in this field through guided readings, field samplings, and lab experimentation. Restricted to incoming freshmen who have been accepted into the HHMI RISE program. Individualized/Independent Study and Research courses require a Course Agreement for Students Enrolled in Non-Standard Courses be completed by the student and faculty member prior to registration by the department.

    BIO 181 Introductory Biology: Ecology, Evolution, and Biodiversity 4.
    Credit is not allowed for BIO 181 and BIO 105 or BIO 125..

    Emphasis on interactions of organisms with their environments, evolutionary change and role of natural selection in the evolution of life forms, biological diversity in the context of form and function of organisms, and on critical thinking, problem solving, and effective communication. Cannot receive credit for both BIO 181 and (BIO 105 or BIO 106 or BIO 115 or BIO 116).

    BIO 183 Introductory Biology: Cellular and Molecular Biology 4.
    Prerequisite: BIO 181 or CH 101.

    Basic concepts and principles of molecular, cellular, and developmental biology. Emphasis will be on the physical basis of life, the cell as the fundamental unit of life, the mechanisms involved in the development of multicellular organisms and on critical thinking, problem solving, experimental design, and effective communication. Cannot receive credit for both BIO 183 and (BIO 105 or BIO 106 or BIO 115 or BIO 116).

    BIO 212 Basic Human Anatomy and Physiology 4.
    Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 183.

    Major emphasis on structure and function of the muscular, skeletal, circulatory and nervous systems of humans. Credit in both BIO 212 and BIO 301 or BIO 302 is not allowed.

    BIO 227 Understanding Structural Diversity through Biological Illustration 3.

    Biological concepts of diversity and anatomy taught through direct observation and illustrative techniques. Lecture topics include plant ID and structure, microscopic life forms, animal anatomy and identification. Laboratory work emphasizes close observation of structures and comparative anatomy as well as illustrative techniques to produce accurate drawings of specimens. Students will be required to provide their own transportation for one field trip.

    BIO 230 The Science of Studying Dinosaurs 3.
    Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 181 or BIO 183 or BIO 105.

    This course introduces students to the scientific method as applied to the study of dinosaurs and the world in which they lived. Because we cannot directly observe dinosaurs, estimating biological features such as running speed, growth rates, and reproductive and other physiological strategies presents challenges. We will examine a range of biological concepts (including cellular biology and physiology, functional morphology and biomechanics, evolutionary relationships, and paleoecology), as well as geological concepts (such as sedimentology, radiometric dating, plate tectonics, and the geologic time scale) as they apply to dinosaurs as living organisms. An understanding of biology at the introductory college level will be assumed.

    BIO 240 Principles of Human Anatomy & Physiology (A): Nervous, Skeletal, Muscular, & Digestive Systems 4.
    Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 183; Cannot receive credit for both this course and BIO 212 or BIO 421.

    BIO 240 provides an introduction to the anatomy and physiology of the nervous, skeletal, muscular, and digestive systems. Fundamental principles addressed throughout the course include (1) maintenance and regulation of homeostasis, (2) communication and control processes throughout the body, (3) integration and interdependence across organ systems, (4) structure-function relationships, and (5) anatomical and physiological adaptation. Together, BIO 240 and BIO 245 provide a strong foundation in human anatomy and physiology (through both lecture and lab) for students preparing for a variety of health-related professions.

    BIO 245 Principles of Human Anatomy & Physiology (B): Endocrine, Cardiovascular, Respiratory & Renal Systems 4.
    Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 183; Cannot receive credit for both this course and BIO 212 or BIO 421.

    BIO 245 provides an introduction to the anatomy and physiology of the endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, and renal systems. Fundamental principles addressed throughout the course include (1) maintenance and regulation of homeostasis, (2) communication and control processes throughout the body, (3) integration and interdependence across organ systems, (4) structure-function relationships, and (5) anatomical and physiological adaptation. Together, BIO 240 and BIO 245 provide a strong foundation in human anatomy and physiology (through both lecture and lab) for students preparing for a variety of health-related professions.

    BIO 267 Research in the Life Sciences I: Research Skills 3.
    Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 181 and Corequisite: BIO 183.

    This course is designed to help first year students learn basic skills associated with scientific research. Class structure is interactive and relies on group collaboration for most projects. Students will become confident in reading and analyzing scientific literature, communicating scientific principles, compiling a poster presentation, presenting at scientific conferences, and attending local scientific symposia as well as practicing some basic laboratory techniques. The 2-semester Research PackTrack Program (BIO 267 and 269) is designed to prepare undergraduates for an original research experience in a scientific laboratory. A B- or better in BIO 267 is required to take BIO 269. Students in BIO 267 are required to attending one research symposium outside of regular class time. Individualized/Independent Study and Research courses require a Course Agreement for Students Enrolled in Non-Standard Courses be completed by the student and faculty member prior to registration by the department.

    BIO 269 Research in the Life Sciences II: Guided Research 3.
    Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 183 and B- or better in BIO 267.

    This course is designed to provide students with a laboratory framework for conducting original research and (together with BIO 267) preparation to move on to conducting research in a scientific laboratory. Students will explore the binding characteristics of bacterially-expressed estrogen receptor genes by generating their own research goals, writing research proposals, conducting original independent research, and presenting their findings in at least one poster symposium. This course is the second part of the Research PackTrack program, and students in this course will have earned a B- or better in the first course (BIO 267). Individualized/Independent Study and Research courses require a Course Agreement for Students Enrolled in Non-Standard Courses be completed by the student and faculty member prior to registration by the department.

    BIO 315 General Parasitology 3.
    Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 181 and BIO 183.

    General principles of parasitic symbiosis. Emphasis on life cycles, epidemiology, and pathology of major parasites of humans and domestic animals.

    BIO 325 Paleontological Field Methods 4.
    Prerequisite: BIO 120 or BIO 181 or BIO 330.

    Understanding the history of life is not possible without first and foremost unearthing it. Discovering, collecting, and conserving fossil specimens for research is a time- and labor-intensive endeavor that requires hands-on training in the field. This course provides introductions to the evolution of life; Mesozoic biodiversity, biostratigraphy, and biogeography; vertebrate skeletal anatomy; stratigraphic and sedimentary concepts; and geomorphology. The course also covers paleontological research methods, including: specimen data collection, conservation, and preparation; topographic and geologic maps; GPS techniques; prospecting and excavation of fossil localities; and taphonomic indicators. Field work in Utah; additional costs involved.

    BIO 330 Evolutionary Biology 3.
    Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 181and BIO 183.

    Principles and patterns of organic evolution. Topics will include the origin of life, patterns of genetic variation, adaptations, natural selection, and the formation of species, the relationship between micro and macroevolution, and the importance of evolution to humans and medicine.

    BIO 361 Developmental Biology 3.
    Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 183.

    In this course students will discover the amazing journey that cells must take to get from an egg to an embryo, form a mature adult, and reproduce in order to continue the life cycle. Students will relate science to everyday life using developmental biology as a forum to integrate many aspects of biology from the molecules in single cells to the complete organism and how it is influenced by evolution and the environment. Cannot receive credit for both BIO 361 and GN 434.

    BIO 370 Developmental Anatomy of the Vertebrates 3.
    Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 181 or BIO 140.

    An integrated study of the functional anatomy, phylogeny, and embryonic development of organ systems in vertebrate animals.

    BIO 375 Developmental Anatomy Laboratory 2.
    Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 181 or BIO 140.

    A hands-on study of embryonic development and organ systems in vertebrate animals, utilizing microscopic examination of living and preserved embryos, demonstrations of skeletons and mammalian organs, and dissections of preserved shark, salamander, and mink.

    BIO 405 Functional Histology 3.
    Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 183.

    Offered only as a distance education course via the internet. Functional Histology describes the cellular structure of tissues and organs. Human organs are emphasized, with brief consideration given to variation in other mammals. Tissue and organ structure is related to function, including examples of malfunction (histopathology). The course is especially appropriate for students planning a career in veterinary science, medicine, or allied health fields. Offered by distance education only.

    BIO 414 Cell Biology 3.
    Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 183 and (CH 221 or CH 225).

    The chemical and physical bases of cellular structure and function with emphasis on methods and interpretations.

    BIO 421 Advanced Human Anatomy and Physiology 3.
    Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 250 or BIO 212.

    A comprehensive survey of the processes involved in the function of specialized cells, tissues and organ systems. Emphasis on basic concepts with orientation toward mammalian and human systems.

    BIO 424 Endocrinology 3.
    Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 250 or BIO 212.

    This course will explore the function of hormones and bioactive compounds in regulating animal physiology and homeostasis. Topics will include a study of hormones and their mechanism of actions in regulating various biological processes including development and growth; reproduction; feeding, digestion and metabolism; ion and water balance; stress and immunity; and sex determination. The methods used to study hormones and their physiological functions will also be addressed. 80% of enrollment is restricted to Biological Sciences and Zoology students with the remaning 20% open for all other majors.

    BIO 426 Advanced Human Anatomy & Physiology Lab 1.
    Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 212 or BIO 250; Corequisite: BIO 421.

    A comprehensive laboratory course surveying the process involved in the function and structure of specialized cells, tissues, and organ systems. Emphasis will be on problem solving and critical thinking skills.

    BIO 432 Evolutionary Medicine 3.
    R: Junior or Senior standing; Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 181 or BIO 183 or GN 311..

    This course introduces the rapidly emerging field of evolutionary medicine as one approach to appreciating evolution as a unifying principle of biology. The primary goal is for students to better understand the evolutionary nature of many issues connected to human health and to better understand the field of evolution via examples that are medically relevant. The course will require reading and discussing scientific literature. Credit is not allowed for both BIO 432 and BIO 330.

    BIO 434 Hormones and Behavior 3.
    Prerequisite:C- or better in BIO 212 or Bio 250 or (ANS 205 & ANS 206).

    This course will focus on the field of behavioral neuroendocrinology, which explores mechanisms by which hormones affect and are affected by behavior. The course will use highly interactive lectures and discussions of material from the primary literature (seminal papers and recent exciting contributions). Student participation in class discussions and in-class assignments will be critical components of the learning process.

    BIO 440 The Human Animal: An Evolutionary Perspective 3.
    Prerequisite: C- or better in one of the following: BIO 317, BIO/PB 330, BIO 410, PSY 406, or PSY 416.

    An in-depth look at the evolution of a wide range of human behaviors, and some aspects of physiology as well. We will critically explore the perceptions we hold of ourselves and the research that has sought to lend new insights into the fundamental bases of human behavior. New uses of evolutionary theory, including the field of evolutionary psychology, will be examined using a comparative approach and careful readings from primary and secondary literature in evolutionary biology and psychology. Classes will be largely discussion based.

    BIO 444 The Biology of Love and Sex 3.
    P: C- or better in two of the following: BIO 330, BIO 410, BIO 424, BIO 488, GN 311; R: Junior or Senior Standing.

    The need to find and seduce a mate is one of the most powerful forces in biology. In this course, we will examine the biological factors that contribute to love and sex. We will adopt a broad evolutionarily-based perspective, examining a variety of strategies in both human and animal systems. Our readings and discussions will cover current hypotheses and experimental methodologies spanning genetics, neuroscience, and endocrinology.

    BIO 481 Senior Capstone Project 1.

    This course provides students an opportunity to integrate and apply knowledge and skills gained from their major studies in addressing an important challenge or problem that they identify. Emphasis will be placed on (1) reflections on the value of experiences outside of the classroom, (2) using discipline-specific knowledge and approaches from both biology and from the second disciplinary area that they chose to study within the B.A. in Biological Sciences, and (3) peer- and self-critiques based on the intellectual standards of critical and creative thinking. Restricted to seniors who will graduate with a B.A. in Biological Sciences. 17BIOBA majors only.

    BIO 482 Capstone Course in Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology 3.
    Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 361, BIO/PB 414, and one of the following: BCH 351 or BCH 451 or BIT 410 or GN 311..

    Topical problems in molecular, cellular, and developmental biology. BIO 482 provides a challenging opportunity for students to integrate and apply knowledge and skills gained from their major studies. Emphasis will be placed on collaborative learning and on effective, professional communication. Topics and instructors will vary from semester to semester. Priority will initially be given to seniors in the MCD curriculum; other students with the necessary prerequisites will be admitted on a space available basis.

    BIO 483 Capstone Course in Integrative Physiology and Neurobiology 3.
    Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 424, BIO 488, and one of the following: BIO/PB 414 or BCH 351 or BCH 451 or GN 311 or ST 311..

    Topical problems in integrative physiology and neurobiology. BIO 483 provides a challenging opportunity for students to integrate and apply knowledge and skills gained from their major studies. Emphasis will be placed on collaborative learning and on effective, professional communication. Topics and instructors will vary from semester to semester. Priority will initially be given to seniors in the IPN curriculum; other students with the necessary prerequisites will be admitted on a space available basis.

    BIO 484 Capstone Course in Human Biology 3.
    Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 421, MB 351 and one of the following: BCH 351 or BCH 451 or GN 311 or ST 311..

    Topical problems in human biology. BIO 484 provides a challenging opportunity for students to integrate and apply knowledge and skills gained from their major studies. Emphasis will be placed on collaborative learning and on effective, professional communication. Topics and instructors will vary from semester to semester. Priority will initially be given to seniors in the HB curriculum; other students with the necessary prerequisites will be admitted on a space available basis.

    BIO 485 Capstone Course in Ecology, Evolution, and Conservation Biology 3.
    Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO/PB 330, BIO/PB 360, and one of the following: BIO 460 or GN 311 or NR 406 or ST 311..

    Topical problems in ecology, evolution, and conservation biology. BIO 485 provides a challenging opportunity for students to integrate and apply knowledge and skills gained from their major studies. Emphasis will be placed on collaborative learning and on effective, professional communication. Topics and instructors will vary from semester to semester. Priority will initially be given to seniors in the EEC curriculum; other students with the necessary prerequisites will be admitted on a space available basis.

    BIO 488 Neurobiology 3.
    Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 250 or BIO 212.

    Overview of the neurosciences, with a focus on fundamental principles in the function, structure, and development of the nervous system. Topics include neuroanatomy, electrical signaling, synaptic transmission, sensory and motor systems, neural development, neural plasticity, and complex brain functions. Multiple levels of analysis, from molecular to behavioral, with an emphasis on the mammalian nervous system.

    BIO 498 Honors Project Part I 3.

    Together, BIO 498 and BIO 499 provide a two-semester sequence for honors projects conducted by students in good standing in an honors program within the Department of Biological Sciences. Before enrollment in BIO 498, students (1) identify a project in consultation with a faculty member, (2) work with that mentor to complete a contract describing the expectations for their work together in BIO 498, and (3) have the contract approved by the honors program coordinator. The approved contract will describe the specific requirements and expectations of the BIO 498 experience. Enrollment only by permission of the honors program director.

    BIO 499 Honors Project Part 2 3.
    Prerequisite: BIO 498.

    Together, BIO 498 and BIO 499 provide a two-semester sequence for honors projects by students in good standing in an honors program within the Department of Biological Sciences. Before beginning BIO 499, students will have successfully completed BIO 498 as well as a contract describing the expectations for their work with the mentor in BIO 499. The contract must be approved by the honors program director. The approved contract will describe the specific requirements and expectations of the BIO 499 experience. Enrollment only by permission of honors program director.

    BIO 560 Population Ecology 3.
    Co-requisite: ST 511.

    Dynamics of natural populations. Current work, theories and problems dealing with population growth, fluctuation, limitation and patterns of dispersion, species interactions, community structure and ecological genetics. One semester of calculus and a junior/senior level ecology course are required.

    BIO 572 Proteomics 3.
    Prerequisite: BIT 410 or BIT 510 or BCH 454 (or approval from the instructor).

    Introduction and history of the field of proteomics followed by the principles and applications of proteomics technology to understand protein expression and protein post-transitional modifications. Laboratory sessions include growing yeast with stable-isotope labeled amino acids, protein purification, Western blots, protein identification and quantification, and protein bioinformatic analysis. This is a half-semester course.

    BIO 727 Biological Mass Spectrometry 3.
    Prerequisite: CH 223 or CH 227.

    Fundamentals of mass spectrometry including topics such as: mass, isotopic distributions, resolving power, mass accuracy. Ionization source topics: electron impact, chemical ionization, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization, electrospray ionization and contemporary methods. Instrumentation and mass analyzers: quadrupole, time-of-flight, Fourier transform based mass analyzers; hybrid instruments such as a quadrupole orbitrap. Tandem mass spectrometry and dissociation. Applications: quantitation, small molecule analysis, and peptide sequencing.