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English (ENG)

ENG - English Courses

ENG 100 Reading and Writing Rhetorically 4.

Intensive practice in reading and writing critically and rhetorically, with attention to how those change according to purpose and situation. Introduction to rhetorical concepts and elements with application to a variety of academic, professional, or civic texts. Exploration of principles of argument and organization. Guidance in developing flexible, self-aware reading and composing processes. Practice in seeking, providing, and responding to constructive feedback. Practice with making choices about grammar, mechanics, and style appropriate to specific rhetorical situations. Extensive writing practice and individualized coaching to support ongoing development as a writer. Intended as preparation for ENG 101.Departmental consent required.

ENG 101 Academic Writing and Research 4.
Prerequisite: Placement via English Department guidelines.

Intensive instruction in academic writing and research. Basic principles of rhetoric and strategies for academic inquiry and argument. Instruction and practice in critical reading, including the generative and responsible use of print and electronic sources for academic research. Exploration of literate practices across a range of academic domains, laying the foundation for further writing development in college. Continued attention to grammar and conventions of standard written English. Successful completion of ENG 101 requires a C- or better. Credit for ENG 101 is not allowed if the student has already fulfilled the first-year writing requirement.

ENG 105 Writing and Research in the Disciplines 1.
Restricted to: Transfer students with a transferring first-year writing course.

Examination of inquiry and writing across a range of academic disciplines, laying the foundation for further writing development in college-level writing across the curriculum. Refinement of basic principles of rhetoric and how those connect to writing in disciplinary communities. Restricted to transfer students with a transferring first-year writing course Successful completion of ENG 105 requires a grade of C- or better. Together with approved transfer credit hours, this course satisfies the Introduction to Writing component of the General Education Program.

ENG 1GEP 100 Level English Composition 3.

100 Level English Composition. Transfer students with 3 hours of ENG 1GEP credit may receive ENG 101 equivalency by completing ENG 105 with a C- or better.

ENG 201 Writing Literary Analysis 3.

Writing about literature for a variety of audiences. Strategies for writing close textual analysis - including attention to versification, narrative technique, and dramatic structure - and for articulating biographical, literary-historical, and cultural-historical contexts. Conventional genres of literary analysis, including "close readings," reviews, and editorial introductions; conventions of organization and prose style in both academic and professional literary discourse; MLA conventions for prose style and documentation.

ENG 206 Studies In Drama 3 .

Selected drama from the classical period to the present. Emphasis on reading for enjoyment as well as understanding theory and development of tragedy, comedy, and other modes of dramatic expression. Writers such as Sophocles, Euripides, Shakespeare, Ibsen, and Shaw, and contemporary playwrights.

ENG 207 Studies in Poetry 3.

Main features of poetry such as tone, voice, form, diction, figurative language, and sound patterns. Reading of poetry from different periods with the goal of learning how to understand, appreciate, and analyze different kinds of poems.

ENG 208 Studies In Fiction 3.

Representative examples of novels and short stories from different periods, emphasizing understanding and appreciation of fiction as a genre, a knowledge of the features and techniques of fiction, and a sense of the development of the genre.

ENG 209 Introduction to Shakespeare 3.

Shakespeare for non-English majors. Seven to ten major plays, including representative comedies, such as The Taming of the Shrew; histories, such as Richard III; tragedies, such as Hamlet; and romances, such as The Tempest.Does not satisfy requirements for English major.

ENG 210 Introduction to Language and Linguistics 3.
Prerequisite: ENG 101.

Linguistics theory and method. Topics include the English sound system, morphology, syntactic structure, semantics, and historical and contemporary dialect variation. Language acquisition, language and the brain, and computer processing and human language.

ENG 214 Introduction to Editing 3.
Prerequisite: ENG 101.

Basic editorial skills with a wide range of publications. Stylistic editing (conventions of written English, consistency, effectiveness of syntax, appropriateness of diction), substantive editing (accuracy, legal issues, ethics), and production editing (layout, typography, electronic publication processing). Introduction to resources such as standard reference works and professional organizations.

ENG 216 Technologies for Texts 3.
Prerequisite: ENG 101.

Uses of computers for creating, designing, analyzing, and disseminating texts, both on desktops and on the Internet. Overview of technologies that facilitate reading, writing, and communication; development of skill with various applications and understanding of their capabilities, limitations, and historical analogues. Recommended for students in journalism and technical writing.

ENG 219 Studies in Great Works of Non-Western Literature 3.

Readings, in English translation, or non-Western literary masterpieces from the beginnings of literacy in the Middle East, Asia, and Africa to the modern period, including excerpts from texts such as the Upanishads, the Ramayana, the Sundiata, Gilgamesh, A Thousand and One Nights, and the Quran and such authors as Confucius, Oe Kenzaburo, Omar Khayyam, Rumi, and Amos Oz.

ENG 220 Studies in Great Works of Western Literature 3.
Credit is not allowed for both ENG 220 and ENG 221 or ENG 222..

Readings, in English translation, of Western literary masterpieces, from the beginnings of literacy in the Middle East and Europe towards the present, including such authors as Homer, Sophocles, Virgil, Ovid, Augustine, Danta, Machiavelli, Shakespeare, Cervantes, Moliere, Voltaire, Goethe, Austen, Flaubert, Dickinson, Tolstoy, Kafka, and Woolf.Credit will not be given for both ENG/FL 220 and either ENG/FL 221 or ENG/FL 222.

ENG 221 Literature of the Western World I 3.
Credit is not allowed for both ENG 221 and ENG 220..

Readings from English translations of Biblical, Classical, Medieval, and Early Renaissance literature, including works by such authors as Homer, Plato, Virgil, Ovid, St. Paul, St. Augustine, Marie de France, and Dante.

ENG 222 Literature of the Western World II 3.
Credit is not allowed for both ENG 222 and ENG 220..

Readings from English translations of Renaissance, Neo-Classical, Romantic, and Early Modern literature, emphasizing the cultures of continental Europe from the Renaissance to 1900, and including such authors as Petrarch, Erasmus, Rabelais, Machiavelli, Shakespeare, Moliere, Voltaire, Rousseau, Goethe, Flaubert, and Tolstoy.

ENG 223 Contemporary World Literature I 3.

Twentieth-century literature of some of the following cultures: Russian, Eastern European, Western European, Latin American, Canadian, Australian.

ENG 224 Contemporary World Literature II 3.

Twentieth-century literature of some of the following cultures: Asian, Arabian, African, Caribbean, Native-American.

ENG 232 Literature and Medicine 3.

Study of literature about illness, epidemics, and the science and practice of medicine. Readings will include works by authors such as Boccaccio, Defoe, George Eliot, Kafka, William Carlos Williams, Susan Sontag, and Tony Kushner.

ENG 233 The Literature of Agriculture 3.

A study of writings on the role of farming in the creation of culture and on the connection between the attention to words necessary for good writing and the attention to the land necessary for good farming. Readings may include ancient and modern texts from a variety of cultures and genres. Possible authors include Virgil, Jefferson, Hardy, Cather.

ENG 246 Literature of the Holocaust 3.

Fictional and nonfictional versions of the Holocaust, focusing on themes of survival, justice, theology, and the limits of human endurance.

ENG 248 Survey of African-American Literature 3.

African-American writing and its relationships to American culture and history. Covers such writers as Wheatley, Douglass, Chesnutt, Dunbar, DuBois, Hughes, Hurston, Wright, and Morrison.

ENG 249 Native American Literature 3.

A survey of Native American literatures from before contact with Europeans to contemporary culture. Writers may include: Apess (Pequot), Ridge (Cherokee), Silko (Laguna Pueblo), Momaday (Kiowa), Power (Sioux) Gunn Allen (Laguna-Sioux), Harjo (Creek), and Erdrich (Anishinaabe).

ENG 251 Major British Writers 3.
Credit is not allowed for ENG 251 and ENG 261 or ENG 262..

Significant British authors chosen from among such figures as Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton, Swift, Pope, Austen, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Tennyson, Browning, Bronte, Dickens, Joyce, Eliot, Woolf, and Yeats.Credit will not be given for both ENG 251 andeither ENG 261 or 262.

ENG 252 Major American Writers 3.
Credit is not allowed for both ENG 252 and ENG 265 or ENG 266..

Significant American authors chosen from among such figures as Franklin, Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, Melville, Douglass, Stowe, Whitman, Dickinson, Twain, James, Frost, Faulkner, Hemingway, and Morrison.Credit will not be given for both ENG 252 and either ENG 265 or 266.

ENG 255 Beyond Britain: Literature from Colonies of the British Empire 3.

This course challenges students to understand the historical, political, and cultural circumstances that gave rise to literary production in 18th- and 19th-century colonial societies. The course will enable students to understand the value of reading 18th- and 19th-century literature from a global perspective, a critical component of literary studies in today's twenty-first-century world.

ENG 260 Reading Literature and Exploring Textuality 3.
Prerequisite: ENG 101.

Introduces fundamental questions in literary history and critical theory. Emphasizes critical reading skills and prepares students for the kinds of courses--surveys, genre courses, author courses, problem-based courses--that are part of the Englishmajor. Papers prepared using standard word processing programs.

ENG 261 English Literature I 3.
Credit is not allowed for both ENG 261 and ENG 251..

A survey of English literature to 1660, including Old English, Middle English, and Renaissance writing, focusing on such central authors as Chaucer, Spenser, Marlowe, Shakespeare, Jonson, Donne, and Milton. Credit will not be given for both ENG 261 and ENG 251.

ENG 262 English Literature II 3.
Credit is not allowed for both ENG 262 and ENG 251..

A survey of English literature from 1660 to the present. Poetry, fiction, drama and intellectual prose by such central writers as Dryden, Pope, Swift, Johnson, Wollstonecraft, Wordsworth, Keats, Shelley, Bronte, Carlyle, Tennyson, Browning, Yeats, Woolf, Joyce and Eliot. Credit will not be given for both ENG 262 and ENG 251.

ENG 265 American Literature I 3.
Credit is not allowed for ENG 265 and ENG 252..

A survey of American literature from the beginnings to the Civil War, including such central authors as Edwards, Franklin, Irving, Emerson, Hawthorne, Melville, Poe, Stowe, Douglass, Thoreau, and Whitman. Credit will not be given for both ENG 265 and ENG 252.

ENG 266 American Literature II 3.
Credit is not allowed for both ENG 266 and ENG 252..

A survey of American literature from the Civil War to the present, including such central authors as Whitman, Dickinson, Twain, James, Crane, Wharton, Frost, Eliot, Hemingway, Hurston, Faulkner, Wright, O'Connor, and Morrison. Credit will not be given for both ENG 266 and ENG 252.

ENG 267 LGBTQI Literature in the U.S. 3.

Chronological survey of works of literature by and about gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, questioning, and intersex communities in the U.S. Primary texts will be considered in historical, political, and literary contexts. Brief consideration of early works from colonial period and 19th century with primary focus on 20th and 21st century texts.

ENG 275 Literature and War 3.
Prerequisite: ENG 101.

A geographical and thematic examination of war and questions it raises, as reflected in selected writings from, Homer, Sophocles, Japan's Tale of the Heike, Shakespeare, The Bhagavad-Gita, Keegan, Kipling, Graham Green, Mulden, Michael Herr, Dexter Filkins, Lucius Shepherd as well as writers on Just War and Deterrence Theory, and military science.

ENG 281 Introduction to Creative Nonfiction 3.
Prerequisite: ENG 101.

This is an introductory course that will instruct students in writing, editing and appreciating the professional nonfiction one finds in magazines, on issue-oriented websites, and in general interest publications, from the New Yorker-style long article to the personal columns one finds on online media outlets: writing about an issue or event in a personal, stylish way while obtaining the rigor of journalism in scrupulous research and clarity. In an ever-enlarging media universe, this is the most visible and commercial of all the creative writing genres.

ENG 282 Introduction to Film 3.

Examination of basic film techniques and methods of film analysis. Emphasis on understanding and appreciating film as a major US and international art form and industry operating in various national, cultural, and historical contexts.

ENG 287 Explorations in Creative Writing 3.
Prerequisite: ENG 101.

Introduction to the basic elements and principles of three genres of creative writing: poetry, fiction and drama. Reading and class discussion of student work. Recommended for students with no prior experience in creative writing.

ENG 288 Fiction Writing 3.
Prerequisite: ENG 101.

Experience in writing short prose fiction. Class critiquing of student work and instruction in techniques of fiction.

ENG 289 Poetry Writing 3.
Prerequisite: ENG 101.

Experience in writing poetry. Class critiquing of student work and instruction in techniques of poetry.

ENG 292 Writing About Film 3.
Prerequisite: ENG 101.

Comprehensive study of various approaches to writing about film. Primary focus is on the critical and evaluative practice involved in writing film criticism for non-academic audiences. Film screenings, discussion of assigned readings, and in-classwriting workshops aid students in preparing a portfolio of film writing that includes film reviews of various lengths.

ENG 298 Special Projects in English 1-3.

Faculty-guided independent study, or courses on special topics determined by departmental interest or need.

ENG 305 Women and Literature 3.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and above.

Nineteenth- and twentieth-century womens' literature, as shaped by the intersecting and competing claims of gender, race, sexuality, and culture. Focus on fiction, accompanied by critical readings from American studies, feminist literary criticism,and postmodern theory.

ENG 314 Technical Document Design and Editing 3.
Prerequisite: ENG 214.

Layout and design principles for written documents; desktop building; legibility, readability testing; conventions of proposals, instructions, and reports; basics of technical editing: usage, vocabulary, style manuals, editing mathematical equations, graphs, tables.

ENG 316 Introduction to News and Article Writing 3.
Prerequisite: ENG 101.

Techniques of writing news stories and feature articles for print and the Web. Components of newsworthiness, examination of evidence, interview techniques, varied writing styles. Role of print- and Web-based journalism in America.

ENG 317 Designing Web Communication 3.
Prerequisite: ENG 214 or ENG 314.

A course in the layout, design, and composition of web-based communication. Students will learn to analyze audiences and their uses of information in order to plan, compose, and critically evaluate web-based communication. Students will acquire skill with HTML coding, screen design, and multimedia authoring and will apply those skills to the composition of a variety of web texts (i.e. websites). Course work will require students to become proficient with commercially available HTML and photoeditors.

ENG 321 Survey of Rhetorical Theory 3.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and above.

Principles of rhetorical theory from its classical origins through the modern period to the present time. Key concepts and theories that provide a critical understanding of the processes of persuasive symbol use.

ENG 323 Writing in the Rhetorical Tradition 3.
Prerequisite: ENG 101.

A writing course based on the study of rhetoric. Readings on the principles of invention, arrangement, and style; analysis of written texts; writing of persuasive texts for a variety of audiences and purposes.

ENG 324 Modern English Syntax 3.
Prerequisite: ENG 101.

Study of Modern English at the sentence level. Analysis of grammatical structure. Consideration of language variation in English.

ENG 325 Spoken and Written Traditions of American English Dialects 3.
Prerequisite: ENG 101.

Basic issues in the study of language; linguistic terminology and categories; grammatical traditions and topics such as prescriptivism and descriptivism, standard and non-standard, orality and literacy; language acquisition and awareness; language aesthetics and ethics.

ENG 326 History of the English Language 3.
Prerequisite: ENG 101.

Development of the English language from its Indo-European origins to the present. Emphasis on historical and comparative linguistic methodology and on changes in sound, syntax, and meaning.

ENG 327 Language and Gender 3.
Prerequisite: ENG 101.

Introduction to the use of language by men and women. Research in Linguistics and Women's Studies addressing issues such as the acquisition of gender-differentiated language, gender and conversational interaction, sexism in language, gender issues in society, and the relationship between language, gender, and other social constructs (e.g., class, culture, and ethnicity).

ENG 328 Language and Writing 3.
Prerequisite: ENG 101.

Study of language structure; specific attention to differences between spoken and written language; print conventions; error analysis; and the application of linguistics to rhetoric and composition. Analysis of a variety of grammatical approaches; how to evaluate grammar textbooks and compositions. Intended for English Education majors.Credit will not be awarded for both ENG 328 and ENG 324.

ENG 330 Screenwriting 3.
Prerequisite: 6 credit hours from courses in writing for media, creative writing, or Film Studies.

Writing for films, story planning, character development, communicating information, building scenes, relationships between script and cinematic dimensions, working with studios and editors.

ENG 331 Communication for Engineering and Technology 3.
Prerequisite: Junior standing. Credit is not allowed for both ENG 331 and ENG 332 or ENG 333..

Written communication in industrial and technical organizations, emphasizing internal communication with managers and technical personnel and including external communication with regulators, vendors, and clients. Intensive practice in writing; relationship of writing to oral and visual communication. For students in engineering and other primarily technological curricula.Credit is not allowed for more than one of ENG 331, ENG 332, and ENG 333.

ENG 332 Communication for Business and Management 3.
Prerequisite: Junior standing. Credit is not allowed for both ENG 332 and ENG 331 or ENG 333..

Written communication in business and public organizations, including both internal communication (such as instructions, policies, management reports) and external communication with clients, vendors, and publics. Intensive practice in writing; relationship of writing to oral and visual communication. For students in business and management-related programs.Credit is not allowed for more than one of ENG 331, ENG 332, and ENG 333.

ENG 333 Communication for Science and Research 3.
Prerequisite: Junior standing. Credit is not allowed for both ENG 333 and ENG 331 or ENG 332..

Written communication in scientific and research contexts, emphasizing relationship between research and writing in problem formulation, interpretation of results, and support and acceptance of research. Intensive practice in writing; relationship of writing to oral and visual communication. For students who plan careers in scientific research.Credit is not allowed for more than one of ENG 331, 332, and 333.

ENG 339 Literature and Technology 3.

Introduction to how the interactions among technologies, media, and literature shape the cultural past. The course pursues studies of fictional and non-fictional texts through several disciplinary perspectives including literary criticism, communications, media theory, and history. Technologies and literary and historical eras considered will vary.

ENG 340 Literature, Art, and Society 3.
Requisite: Sophomore Standing or Above.

This course explores the intersection of literature and the arts, including the visual and/or performing arts, and their role as social commentary. It will consider the expressive power of the medium in the arts, whether that of an individual artist working across mediums or a collaboration between artists, and will examine the rich relations that have existed between literature, the arts, and important social movements of the day. Disciplinary perspectives include literary criticism, history, art history, performance studies, and museum studies.

ENG 341 Literature and Science 3.
Requisite: Sophomore Standing or Above.

This course tracks the imaginative potentials, social repercussions, and interdisciplinary mixing of literature and science since the emergence of empiricism in the sixteenth century. Well before literature and science divided into "two cultures." they supplied a fruitful crossover for ideas about how and why the world works and how we gain new knowledge. Even with the development of modern disciplines, literature plays an important role in cultural assessments of scientific discovery and education. Students will read a selection of works from literary as well as scientific writers, analyzing texts and historical contexts and producing written arguments within an interdisciplinary framework.

ENG 342 Literature of Space and Place 3.
Requisite: Sophomore Standing or Above.

This course investigates how various spatial categories. For example, the city, the pastoral, wilderness, region, nation, or the globe. Work in and are constructed by literary texts. Humanities fields have increasingly noted the importance of space and place in shaping our lives and as key mechanisms through which ideas of gender, sexuality, race, class, national identity, or nature are shaped. Our Spatial analysis of literature will borrow from an interdisciplinary range of methods: cultural and historical geography, cartography, urban studies, and/or environmental studies. The course also addresses the historical and cultural contexts that have shaped ideas of space.

ENG 349 African Literature in English 3.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and above.

Anglophone literature in Africa. Emphasis on the relationship between the African world-view and literary production and the persistent trend by African writers to connect literature with politics. Writers such as Achebe, Ngugi, Soyinka, and Serote.

ENG 350 Professional Internships 3.

Directed work for CHASS majors including work-site mentoring and evaluation. Department supervision includes a course work directed toward designing employment application materials, developing a portfolio of professional work or relevant research paper, considering a variety of career options, and reading literature on workplace socialization. students must provide their own transportation to the internship site. Modest liability insurance fee required. Students must have at least a 2.5 overall GPA and at least a 3.0 GPA in the major, be a junior or senior CHASS major or minor, and must complete the application process outlined on the Internship Program Website or provide the internship coordinator with contact information for your supervisor at an internship you obtained independently.

ENG 359 Topics in Film Studies 3.

Critical approaches to focused film topics involving film genres, directorial styles, or trends within a national cinema. Topics will vary from semester to semester.

ENG 361 Studies in British Poetry 3.
Requisite: Sophomore Standing or Above.

An examination of selected British poetry within its historical and cultural contexts. The course will focus on poetry of the Victorian period. Poets studied include Matthew Arnold, Robert and Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Rudyard Kipling, Christina and Dante Gabriel Rossetti, Alfred, Lord Tennyson, and Oscar Wilde. Class discussion will focus on analysis of literary texts within the larger cultural contexts of debates over art and aesthetics, science and industrialization, gender roles, religion, and imperial expansion.

ENG 362 Studies in the British Novel 3.
Requisite: Sophomore Standing or Above.

Emphasizes major novelists such as Behn, Fielding, Defoe, Richardson, Swift, Austen, Dickens, the Bront‘s, Eliot, Carroll, Hardy, Stevenson, Wilde, Stoker, James, Woolf, Forster, Joyce, Orwell, Lawrence, Lessing, Murdoch, Burgess, McEwan, Ishiguro, Byatt, Mantel, Zadie Smith.

ENG 364 History of Film to 1940 3.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and above.

Technological developments and aesthetic movements that shaped international cinema production from the beginning of the industry to 1940. Formal evolution in camera movement, editing, sound, narrative form, and the documentary. The rise to prominence of Hollywood and international cinemas in historical, economic, and cultural contexts.

ENG 368 American Poetry to 1900 3.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and above.

American poetry written in English from the colonial period to 1900. Development of styles and themes in relation to historical context. Emphasis on poets such as Bradstreet, Taylor, Wheatley, Poe, Sigourney, Emerson, Longfellow, Whitman, Dickinson, and Robinson.

ENG 369 The American Novel of the 19th Century 3.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and above.

Major novels illustrating the development of American fiction from Romanticism to Realism and Naturalism. Works by such writers as Brown, Cooper, Hawthorne, Stowe, Melville, Twain, Howells, James, Norris, Crane, Chopin, and Dreiser.

ENG 370 American Fiction, Twentieth Century and Beyond 3.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and above.

Study of narrative fiction written in the twentieth-century and after by American writers. This course will examine major developments in narrative form and technique, based on developments in important literary traditions such as realism, modernism or postmodernism. The course will situate the fiction in key contexts, whether literary or cultural. Representative writers: Ernest Hemingway, Gertrude Stein, William Faulkner, Toni Morrison and Cormac McCarthy.

ENG 372 American Poetry, Twentieth Century and Beyond 3.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and above.

Study of poetry written in the twentieth-century and after by American poets. This course will examine major developments in form and technique by poets influenced by transformative movements such as Imagism, Modernism, the Objectivists, Black Mountain poetics, New York School and subsequent developments. The course will situate poetry in key contexts, whether literary or cultural. Representative poets: T.S. Eliot, H.D., Langston Hughes, Frank OÀHara, C.D. Wright and Yusef Komunyakaa.

ENG 374 History of Film From 1940 3.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and above.

Technological developments and aesthetic movements that have shaped international cinema production from 1940 to the present. Evolution in camera movement, editing, sound, narrative form, and the documentary. Post-war Hollywood cinema and international film industries (both established and emerging) in historical, economic and cultural context.

ENG 375 African American Cinema 3.

Survey and analysis of African American film culture from 1900-present. Examination of pre-Hollywood, classical Hollywood, and Independent filmmaking. Particular focus on independent filmmakers' response to dominant industry representations and the work of filmmakers who seek to create a specifically African American cinematic style.

ENG 376 Science Fiction 3.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and above.

Representative works of science fiction. Emphasis on works written in the twentieth century, with some attention to the history and development of the genre.

ENG 377 Fantasy 3.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and above.

Representative works in the genre of fantasy. Emphasis on works of 19th and 20th centuries. Authors such as Carroll, Lewis, Tolkien, Borges, LeGuin, and Gardner.

ENG 378 Women & Film 3.

This course will introduce students to the rich international history of women's participation in the motion picture industry. Course includes readings, screenings, discussions, and a final examination.

ENG 380 Modern Drama 3.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and above.

Major plays and playwrights from Ibsen to Pinter, including at least some of the following: Strindberg, Chekhov, Shaw, O'Neill, Hellman, Pirandello, Brecht, Williams, Miller, Albee.

ENG 381 Creative Nonfiction Writing Workshop 3.
Prerequisite: ENG 215, 287, 288, or 289.

A workshop in creative nonfiction (literary or magazine journalism) for the student with demonstrated understanding of the basic techniques of creative writing and journalism.

ENG 382 Film and Literature 3.

Ways of adapting literary works to film form. Similarities and differences between these two media. Emphasis on the practical art of transforming literature into film. Attention to the impact of film upon literature.

ENG 384 Introduction to Film Theory 3.
Prerequisite: ENG 282.

Survey of critical approaches to film art. Application of theoretical paradigms--formalist, realist, psychoanalytic, feminist, poststructuralist--to individual films, genres, national cinemas and directors.

ENG 385 Biblical Backgrounds of English Literature 3.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and above.

Influences of the Bible-principal forms, genres, and texts-on major English and American writers such as Milton, Spenser, Melville, Eliot, and Faulkner.

ENG 388 Intermediate Fiction Writing Workshop 3.
Prerequisite: ENG 288;Students must have earned a B or better in ENG 288..

An intermediate workshop in creative writing for students with demonstrated understanding of the basic techniques of writing prose fiction.

ENG 389 Intermediate Poetry Writing Workshop 3.
Prerequisite: ENG 289;Students must have earned a B or better in ENG 289..

An intermediate workshop in creative writing for students with demonstrated understanding of the basic techniques of writing poetry.

ENG 390 Classical Backgrounds of English Literature 3.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and above.

Literature of the ancient Western world and its influence on English and American writing. Emphasis on the connections between the two bodies of literature. Covers such writers as Plato, Horace, Virgil, and St. Augustine.

ENG 391 Special Topics in Modern Drama 3.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and above.

Various topics in modern drama covering different cultures, issues, and theatrical practices within the last 100 years. Modern American drama, modern British drama, modern World Drama, and European theatre from World War II to the present.

ENG 392 Major World Author 3.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and above.

Intensive study in English, of the writings of one (or two) author(s) from outside the English and American traditions. Sample subjects: Homer, Virgil and Ovid, Lady Murasaki, Marie de France and Christine de Pizan, Dante, Cervantes, Goethe, Balzacand Flaubert, Kafka, Proust, Lessing and Gordimer, Borges and Marquez, Neruda, Achebe, Soyinka, Calvino, Walcott and Naipaul. Topics will vary from semester to semester.May be repeated for credit with new topic.

ENG 393 Studies in Literary Genre 3.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and above.

Concentrated treatment of one literary genre, such as the epic, the lyric, the drama, satire, romance, autobiography, the essay, the novel, or the short story. Treatment of materials from several national or ethnic cultures and several periods. All readings in English. Course may be taken three times for credit.Course may be taken 3 times in different genres.

ENG 394 Studies in World Literature 3.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and above.

Study of a subject in world literature: for example, African literature, Asian literature, Hispanic literature, East European literature, Comedy, the Epic, the Lyric, Autobiography, the Faust legend, or Metamorphosis. Subjects vary according to availability of faculty. Readings in English translation.

ENG 395 Studies in Rhetoric and Digital Media 3.
Prerequisite: ENG 101.

Study of the influence of emerging technologies on rhetorical theory and practice. Rhetorical analysis of texts, including visual and audio texts. Invention and construction of digital media texts as a means of engaging rhetorical theory and analysis. Topics vary to adapt to emerging technologies and changing vernacular practices.

ENG 399 Contemporary Literature 3.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and above.

Literature from the twentieth-century and twenty-first century. Readings may be from various genres including fiction, non-fiction, drama, and poetry. Writers will be from the English-speaking world, but also reading may include writers outside it, that is, writers whose work has been translated into English. This course will track important developments, whether literary or cultural, in contemporary literature. Representative writers: Jean Rhys, James Baldwin, W.G. Sebald, Leslie Marmon Silko, August Wilson, Salman Rushdie and Wislawa Szymborska.

ENG 400 Applied Criticism 3.
Prerequisite: LTN Majors, Senior standing, formal admission to the methods courses, Corequisite: ECI 450.

Types and methods of literary criticism designed specifically for students intending to teach English in high school.

ENG 405 Literature for Adolescents 3.
Prerequisite: Junior standing..

The history, types, and characteristics of literature for adolescents. Emphasizes reading and analyzing the literature by exploring the themes, literary elements, and rationale for teaching literature for adolescents. Addresses ways in which this literature can be integrated and implemented in English/Language Arts curriculum.

ENG 406 Modernism 3.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and above.

International Modernist movement in literature, from its nineteenth-century origins to its culmination in the early twentieth century. Definitions of modernity, as embodied in a variety of genres. Placement of Modernist texts within a variety of cultures that produced them.

ENG 407 Postmodernism 3.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and above.

Literary expressions of Postmodernism, from its origins in the Modernist movement through its culmination in the later decades of the twentieth century. Definitions of post modernity, as embodied in a variety of genres. Placement of Postmodernist texts within a variety of cultures that have produced them.

ENG 410 Studies in Gender and Genre 3.
Requisite: Sophomore Standing or Above.

This course examines the ways in which women writers from diverse backgrounds have revised the literary genres to include the varied experiences of women. It will focus on a different generic area, such as poetry, fiction, drama or autobiography, depending on its instructor.

ENG 411 Rhetorical Criticism 3.
Prerequisite: Junior standing.

Rhetorical analysis of public speeches, social movements, political campaigns, popular music, advertising, and religious communication. Neo-Aristotelian criticism, movement studies, genre criticism, dramatistic analysis, content analysis, fantasy theme analysis.

ENG 416 Advanced News and Article Writing 3.
Prerequisite: ENG 316.

Advanced work in writing news stories, profiles, features, and investigative stories. Includes analysis and critical reading of print media. Assumes thorough knowledge of AP style and rudiments of news and feature writing.

ENG 417 Editorial and Opinion Writing 3.
Prerequisite: ENG 214, ENG 316.

Discussing and writing newspaper and magazine editorials, with added attention to other forms of opinion in print, such as columns and books and music reviews.

ENG 420 Major American Author 3.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and above.

Intensive study of the writings of one (or two) American author(s). Developments across the career, relationships between the writing and the life, the writer's participation in a culture and an historical moment. Sample subjects: Emerson and Thoreau, Melville, Whitman, Stowe and Douglass, Dickinson, Twain, James and Wharton, Frost, O'Neill, Fitzgerald and Hemingway, Faulkner, Hurston and Wright, O'Conner, Morrison.

ENG 421 Computer Documentation Design 3.
Prerequisite: ENG 214 or ENG 331 or ENG 332 or ENG 333.

Theory and design of documentation for computer hardware and software, including user guides, reference manuals, quick reference guides, tutorials, online documentation, and CD-based media delivery. Training in alternative documentation testing procedures, usability testing, and collaborative revision.

ENG 422 Writing Theory and the Writing Process 3.
Prerequisite: ENG 101.

Theory and research on the processes and contexts of written discourse; cognitive, socio-cultural, educational perspectives; reflective and research-based accounts of the writing process; analysis of discourse contexts and communities.

ENG 425 Analysis of Scientific and Technical Writing 3.
Prerequisite: Junior standing.

The role of communication in the creation of scientific knowledge and technical designs and artifacts; methods of analyzing texts and of studying their creation and use; relationships between writing and other forms of communication. Field research in a scientific or technological setting.

ENG 426 Analyzing Style 3.
Prerequisite: ENG 101.

Development of a greater understanding of and facility with style in written discourse. Theories of style, stylistic features; methods of analysis, imitation.

ENG 430 Advanced Screenwriting 3.
Prerequisite: ENG 330.

Advanced Screenwriting students will complete ready-to-sell screenplays over the course of the semester. Workload includes taking home two 100-page scripts each week and giving a thorough critique both in writing and in class discussion. Course included pitch sessions, opening scene workshops, intensive reading and writing.

ENG 439 17th-Century English Literature 3.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and above.

Works of major nondramatic literary figures in England during the period 1600-1700, such as Donne, Jonson, Herbert, Marvell, Bacon, and Browne.

ENG 448 African-American Literature 3.
Prerequisite: Junior standing..

Survey of African-American literature and its relationships to American culture, with an emphasis on fiction and poetry since 1945. Writers such as Bontemps, Morrison, Hurston, Baldwin, Hayden, Brooks, Naylor, Harper, and Dove.

ENG 449 16th-Century English Literature 3.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and above.

Nondramatic prose and poetry of the sixteenth century, with consideration of literary types and movements. Emphasis on major authors, including Sidney and Spenser.

ENG 451 Chaucer 3.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and above.

Introduction to the study of Chaucer through an intensive reading of The Canterbury Tales.

ENG 452 Medieval British Literature 3.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and above.

Readings in the rich poetic, thematic, and generic diversity of Medieval British literature. Representative selections from romance, dream-vision, allegory, fabliau, lyric, chronicle, saint's life, satire, in historical and cultural contexts. Priorknowledge of Middle English unnecessary.

ENG 453 The Romantic Period 3.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and above.

Emphasis on the major poetry of Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats, with selected readings from other poets, prose writers, and dramatists of the period.

ENG 455 Literacy in the U.S. 3.
Prerequisite: ENG 101; Junior or senior standing..

Academic study of the nature, functions, acquisition, institutionalization, and present state of literacy in the U.S., with special focus on issues of cultural diversity and social inequity. Three contexts for literacy - personal, academic, and home/community - provide a range of readings, investigations, and opportunities for reflection and further study. Service-learning component links this academic study to required tutoring (2 hours per week) of children and adults in local community service agencies in addition to attending class. Students will need to provide their own transportation.

ENG 459 Seminar in Film Studies 3.
Prerequisite: ENG 282, ENG 384 and Junior or Senior standing.

Advanced critical approaches to focused film topics involving film genres, directories styles, or trends within a national cinema. This seminar-style course will include screenings, readings, regular discussions, and a substantive final research paper. Topics will vary from semester to semester. Junior or senior standing or permission of instructor required.

ENG 460 Major British Author 3.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and above.

In-depth study of the works of one (or two) British author(s) within their historical and literary-historical context. Sample authors might include; Spencer and Sidney, Swift and Pope, Austen, Wordsworth and Coleridge, Keats and Shelley, the Brontes, the Brownings, Dickens, George Eliot, Hardy, Joyce, Woolf.

ENG 462 18th-Century English Literature 3.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and above.

Major figures in English literature between 1660 and 1790. Works studied in relation to social, cultural, political, and religious developments. Emphasis on writers such as Dryden, Swift, Pope, Johnson.

ENG 463 The Victorian Period 3.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and above.

Significant British poets, writers of prose non-fiction, and novelists studied in the social, economic, scientific, intellectual, and theological contexts of the Victorian era.

ENG 464 British Literature and the Founding of Empire 3.
Requisite: Sophomore Standing or Above.

This course uses literature to understand rapid shifts in making and breaking empire. Reading novels, newspapers, essays, and autobiographies, we will study liberty in colonial North America, the orientalism of British India, and adventure writing of nineteenth-century Africa. In 1773, George McCartney, a British imperial officer, looked out from India and saw a "vast empire on which the sun never sets." Ten years later the thirteen American colonies that had founded that empire were gone. We will use this sentiment to determine how empire shaped the world and to consider how it contributed to Britain's literary and cultural traditions.

ENG 465 British Literature and the Dissolution of Empire 3.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and above.

This course examines the role of British literature in the dissolution of empire and the reshaping of Britain as a multicultural society. As poet Louise Bennett wryly comments, the 20th century British experience is one of "colonization in reverse." From the departure of the colonies, to the impact of American expatriates and Caribbean, African and South Asian immigrants, to the Scottish nationalist critique, this period is one of radical change in British national identity. At the center of that change are the global writers who create a heterogeneous literature that represents both a "new" British literature and a post-empire reality.

ENG 466 Transatlantic Literatures 3.
Requisite: Sophomore Standing or Above.

This course will investigate notable literary exchanges in the literatures of the Atlantic Rim, long linked by trade (including slavery) as well as by commerce of many other kinds. Examples of these exchanges include Great Britain and the U.S., the U.S. and the Caribbean, and very importantly, between African cultures on the Atlantic and Atlantic cultures in the U.S. The course will explore the literary and cultural hybridity brought about by these exchanges. Representative writers: William Shakespeare and Aimee Cesaire, Joseph Conrad and Chinua Achebe; Charlotte Bronte and Jean Rhys; William Faulkner and Edouard Glissant.

ENG 467 American Colonial Literature 3.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and above.

Survey of American literature and thought from its beginnings to the adoption of the Constitution. Representative works such as travel and exploration reports, Indian captivity narratives, diaries, journals, autobiographies, sermons, and poetry.

ENG 468 American Romantics 3.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and above.

Major American writers from 1825 to 1865. Relationship between literary developments and social change. Emphasis on such writers as Emerson, Hawthorne, Cooper, Poe, Melville, Douglass, Stowe, Thoreau, and Whitman.

ENG 469 American Realism and Naturalism 3.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and above.

Major American writers from 1865 to 1914, with emphasis on novelists such as Twain, James, Howells, Chopin, and Dreiser.

ENG 470 American Literature, Twentieth Century and Beyond 3.
Requisite: Sophomore Standing or Above.

American Literature from the twentieth century until the present day. Readings from various genres such as fiction, non-fiction, drama and poetry. Emphasis will be on key literary developments in relation to important critical/cultural contexts. Representative writers: F. Scott Fitzgerald, Gwendolyn Brooks, Zora Neale Hurston, James Baldwin, David Mamet, and Maxine Hong Kingston.

ENG 476 Southern Literature 3.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and above.

Literary traditions of the Southeastern United States from colonization through the present, including study of such major writers as Byrd, Jefferson, Simms, Poe, Douglass, Twain, Chesnutt, Glasgow, Hurston, Tate, Wolfe, Faulkner, Warren, Wright, Welty, Williams, O'Conner, Percy, and Lee Smith.

ENG 480 Modern Drama 3.

ENG 481 History of the Book 3.
Restriction: Junior standing or above.

This course provides an overview of book history from the invention of the hand-written codex through the printing press and current digital manifestations, including electronic texts and Google Books. Students will examine rare materials in hands-on settings and during field trips to special collections libraries; try out historical techniques of writing, printing, and manufacture; and investigate the many social roles involved in creating and using books, including those of author, editor, printer, publisher, reader, and seller.

ENG 482 Reading in the Digital Age 3.
Junior standing or above.

This capstone questions how textual, reading, and interpretive practices are changing in a digital age. Using a diverse sample of literature, the course explores the consequences of digital remediation for texts and literary studies. Students will learn concepts in mediation, analyze works of literature on different reading platforms, and experiment with computational methods for literary curation, quantitative analysis, and data visualization. Students of all technical levels are welcomed; no special skills are required beyond basic familiarity with a computer.

ENG 483 Literature and Media 3.
Restriction: Junior standing or above.

This course will explore how shifts in media technologies have influenced the creation, transmission, and reception of literature. Topics might include: investigations of how the spread of printing presses led to the first newspapers in eighteenth-century London, with comparison to how newspapers look today; study of the importance of serial publication in magazines for nineteenth-century authors like Charles Dickens; and examinations of spy novels, detective fiction, and the rise of the paperback in the twentieth century before turning to the explosion of graphic novels in the twenty-first century.

ENG 486 Shakespeare, The Earlier Plays 3.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and above.

Shakespeare's major works before 1600 with emphasis on his development as a playwright.

ENG 487 Shakespeare, The Later Plays 3.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and above.

Shakespeare's major works after 1600 with emphasis on his tragedies and the late romances.

ENG 488 Advanced Fiction Writing Workshop 3.
Prerequisite: ENG 388.

An advanced workshop in creative writing for students with demonstrated understanding and accomplishment in the techniques of writing prose fiction.This course is restricted to juniors and seniors. Departmental approval required.

ENG 489 Advanced Poetry Writing Workshop 3.
Prerequisite: ENG 389.

An advanced workshop in creative writing for the students with demonstrated understanding and accomplishment in the techniques of writing poetry.This course is restricted to juniors and seniors. Departmental approval required.

ENG 490 Studies in Medieval Literature 3.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and above.

Topics (in rotation) in medieval English and continental literature, such as Arthurian legend and literature; women in medieval society and literature; the self in the late Middle Ages. Focus on special areas of interest, with attention to culturaland historical backgrounds and contemporary scholarship. Some texts in Middle English, some in translation; no prior knowledge of Middle English needed.

ENG 491 Honors in English 3.
Requisite: English Majors Only.

Intensive course or independent study project designed as one portion of the Honors Program in English. Subject varies.

ENG 492 Special Topics in Film Styles and Genres 3.

Critical approaches to focused film topics involving film genres, directorial styles, or trends within a national cinema. Topics will vary from semester to semester.

ENG 494 Special Topics in Linguistics 3.
Prerequisite: ENG 101.

(May be repeated for credit with new topic.) Methodology and analysis within various branches of linguistics, e.g. syntax, semantics, computational linguistics, phonology, dialectology, historical linguistics, discourse analysis. Examination of topic's basic methods, controversial issues, analysis of linguistic data. Projects may include novel analyses of English constructions, parsing programs, field work reports.

ENG 495 Studies in Literature 3.
Junior standing or above.

Intensive exploration of selected topics or issues in the area of literature/English studies with a wide variation in content that sometimes includes materials from several national or ethnic cultures and periods. Course may be used to meet the capstone requirement in the English literature concentration.

ENG 496 Seminar in Literary Criticism 3.
Prerequisite: 9 hours of literature at the 300 level or above.

Introduction to theoretical and applied criticism of literature, primarily for English majors and minors. May include traditional theory from Plato and Aristotle to New Criticism, as well as contemporary psychoanalytical, social, historical, and linguistic approaches to literature.

ENG 498 Special Topics in English 1-6.
Prerequisite: Six hours in ENG above the 100 level.

Directed individual study or experimental course offerings in language or literature. Individual study arranged through consultation with faculty member and Director of Undergraduate Studies.

ENG 499 Special Topics in Creative Writing 3.
Prerequisite: ENG 288 or ENG 289 ; Students must have earned a grade of B or better in 288 or 289 or they must have demonstrated competence in creative writing as determined by instructor..

Techniques and practice in writing a particular form within the traditional genres of poetry, prose, or drama, such as "Creative Non-Fiction," "Science Fiction," "The Novella," or "The Satirical Poem." Topics vary from semester to semester.

ENG 506 Verbal Data Analysis 3.
Prerequisite: ENG 513 or ENG 527 or COM 541 or COM 542.

Research strategies for understanding how spoken and written language shapes activities (e.g., design, instruction, counseling, gaming interactions, e-commerce, etc.). Tracking patterned uses of language as verbal data (e.g., grammatically topically, thematically), formulating research questions, and designing studies to answer those questions through quantitative descriptive means. Sampling, collecting and managing data, developing coding schemes, achieving reliability, using descriptive statistical measures, and reporting the results.

ENG 507 Writing for Health and Environmental Sciences 3.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing, Doctoral student, Master's student.

Readings, on-site research, document gathering, and analysis of writing in health and environmental science fields. Students study, practice, and present major forms of writing in their profession. Professional portfolio due at the end of the semester. Intended for students interested in exploring or pursuing writing careers in medicine, pharmaceuticals, nutrition, agriculture, ecology, or other health and environmental science-related industries, or professionals who wish to improve knowledge and skills.

ENG 508 Usability Studies for Technical Communication 3.
Prerequisite: ENG 517.

Advanced study of usability inspection, inquiry, and testing theories and practices related to instrumental and instructive texts (i.e., computer-related, legal, medical, pharmaceutical, financial, etc.). Practical experience testing a variety of texts using several testing methods, including completion of a substantial, lab-based usability test. For students planning careers in technical communication, human factors, software design, and multimedia design.

ENG 509 Old English Literature 3.

Study of Old English language with selections from important poems including Beowulf. Examination of the poetry in the light of various modern critical approaches.

ENG 510 Middle English Literature 3.

Study of major works of medieval English literature (exclusive of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales) in historical context, as reflections of and influences on social and cultural change. Includes works such as Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Pearl, Langland's Piers Plowman and Malory's Morte d'Arthur.

ENG 511 Theory and Research In Composition 3.

Research and scholarship in composition and the teaching of writing. Major theoretical perspectives (such as expressive, social, cognitive, feminist), current issues (such as audience, invention, revision, evaluation) and various research methods.

ENG 512 Theory and Research In Professional Writing 3.
Corequisite: ENG 666.

Introduction to research and scholarship in professional writing and writing in the workplace. Major theoretical perspectives for studying writing; current issues (such as usability, readability, collaboration, gender, authorship); and various research methods.

ENG 513 Empirical Research In Composition 3.

Reading and evaluation of empirical research in written composition; guided practice in qualitative and quantitative methods. Basic principles of research; problem definition, research design and statistical analysis, description and assessment of written products and processes.

ENG 514 History Of Rhetoric 3.

Historical development of rhetorical theory with attention to contemporaneous rhetorical practice and philosophical trends. Major focus on the classical period with briefer coverage of medieval, Renaissance, 18th-century, and 19th-century developments. Implications for contemporary theory and practice, including pedagogical practice.

ENG 515 Rhetoric Of Science and Technology 3.

The relationships among rhetoric, scientific knowledge and technological development and of changes in how these relationships understood historically. Practice in critical analysis of scientific and technical discourse. Consideration of scientific and technical language and of public controversy concerning science and technology.

ENG 516 Rhetorical Criticism: Theory and Practice 3.
Prerequisite: Graduate Standing or the equivalent of COM/ENG 321 or COM/ENG 411.

Development, achievements, limitation of major critical methods in the 20th century, including neo-Aristotelian, generic, metaphoric, dramatistic, feminist, social-movement, fantasy-theme and postmodern approaches. Criticism of political discourse,institutional discourse, discourses of law, medicine, religion, education, science, the media. Relations between rhetorical and literary criticism and other forms of cultural analysis.

ENG 517 Advanced Technical Writing, Editing and Document Design 3.
P: ENG 314 or graduate standing.

Advanced study of technical communication practice, including content management, document design, and technical editing and usability. For students planning careers as technical communicators.

ENG 518 Publication Management for Technical Communicators 3.
Prerequisite: ENG 517.

Advanced study of publication and team management issues such as staffing, scheduling, cost-reduction and subcontracting. For students planning careers as technical communicators.

ENG 519 Online Information Design and Evaluation 3.
Prerequisite: ENG 517.

Concepts and practices related to multimedia information design, information architectures, human-computer interaction, and genre for complex websites.

ENG 520 Science Writing for the Media 3.

Coverage of three areas: how to write science articles for a variety of mass media, how to think critically about how mass media cover science, and how to think critically about science itself. Preparation for careers not only in mass media, but also in scientific and technological organizations.

ENG 522 Writing in Nonacademic Settings 3.

Directed work experience for English Department graduate students including work-site mentoring and evaluation and concurrent academic assignments. Academic component includes reading and discussing articles relevant to the day-to-day practice of writing in nonacademic settings and completion of a project that connects academic and nonacademic components. Graduate Standing in an English Department graduate program required. Modest liability insurance fee required. Students must provide their own transportation to the practicum site.

ENG 523 Language Variation Research Seminar 3.
Prerequisite: ENG 525.

Field-initiated research. Group and individual research topics focused on current sociolinguistic issues related to language variation and changes. Ethnographic and quantitative methods of analysis.

ENG 524 Introduction to Linguistics 3.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or 12 hrs. in ENG.

Introduction to theoretical linguistics, especially for students in language, writing and literature curricula. Phonology, syntax, semantics, history of linguistics; relation of linguistics to philosophy, sociology and psychology; application of theory to analysis of texts.

ENG 525 Variety In Language 3.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or 12 hrs. in ENG.

Language variation description, theory, method and application; focus on regional, social, ethnic and gender varieties; sociolinguistic analysis, basic discourse analysis.

ENG 527 Discourse Analysis 3.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Overview of major issues, theories, and research methods in contemporary discourse analysis. It explores how language as a form of social practice regulates social actions, relations and identities; how ways of speaking construct and are constructed by social order, cultural practice, and individual agency. Texts/discourses are analyzed to examine how speakers create meaning through formal linguistic choices; what the micro-organization of talk reveals about social order; how critical understanding of discourse helps to interpret complex processes of social life.

ENG 528 Sociophonetics 3.

A survey of sociophonetics: the study of language variation using modern phonetic techniques. Acoustic analysis of consonants, vowels, prosody, voice quality. Speech perception experiments and how they can be applied to a variety of issues. Applications to theoretical issues in sound change, sociolinguistics, phonetics and phonology, and cognition of language. Graduate standing required.

ENG 529 16th-Century Non-Dramatic English Literature 3.

Prose and poetry of the English Renaissance, excluding drama. Special attention to major authors, including Spenser and Sidney, and to intellectual, cultural and literary backgrounds and developments. Introduction to pertinent methods and issues of scholarly inquiry and critical interpretation.

ENG 530 17th-Century English Literature 3.

A close examination of the literature of England from 1600 to 1660 with emphasis on major literary figures and movements, development of important literary forms and genres and relationship between literary texts of this period and their philosophical, political and theological contexts. Some bibliographical and textural assignments. Content and focus varies according to instructor's emphasis, but writers covered usually include Donne, Herbert, Crashaw, Marvell and Browne.

ENG 531 American Colonial Literature 3.

Survey of American literature and thought from the beginning to adoption of the constitution. Representative works such as travel and exploration reports, Indian captivity narratives, diaries, journals, auto biographies, sermons and poetry.

ENG 532 Narrative Analysis 3.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Introduction to theories concerning the structure, use, and interpretation of narratively organized discourse; application of methods of narrative analysis to both spoken and written narratives.

ENG 533 Bilingualism and Language Contact 3.

Linguistic, cultural and socio-political aspects of bi- and mulitlingualism in a global context. Issues and implications of bilingualism from both theoretical and practical perspectives. Topics inlcude: language maintenance and shift; child and adult bilingualism; relationship between language, culture and identity in bi- and multilingual situations; psycholinguistic aspects and lingustic outcomes of bilingual contact, such as code-switching, convergence and language attrition; language ideology, the politics of language choice and language policy; globalization and intercultural communication. Must hold graduate standing or get consent of instructor for advanced undergraduate students.

ENG 534 Quantitative Analysis om Sociolinguistics 3.
Prerequisite: ENG 523.

The quantitative methods specific to sociolinguistic variation are examined in detail, focusing both on gaining experience using quantitative analysis software and on understanding fundamental concepts underlying the quantitative analysis of language variation. This course takes students beyond the basic familiarity with quantitative analysis gained in ENG 523, both in depth of investigation and in attention to the link between method and theory.

ENG 536 Research Methods in Phonology 3.
Requisite: Enrollment in the Sociolinguistics concentrations of the MA English or PhD Sociology programs or permission of instructor..

This course explores laboratory and computational tools for investigating linguistic sound systems (e.g., speech perception experiments, speech production tools such as ultrasound imaging, and computational tools such as automated transcription and acoustic measurement). Requires enrollment in the Sociolinguistics MA or PhD program or permission of instructor.

ENG 539 Seminar In World Literature 3.

Rotating topics in world literature, including treatment of the subject's theoretical or methodological framework. Possible subjects: colonialism and literature; orality and literature; the Renaissance; the Enlightenment; translation; comparison ofNorth and South American literatures; African literary traditions; post-modernism and gender. Readings in English (original languages encouraged but not required).

ENG 540 History Of Literary Criticism 3.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or PBS status.

Survey of the history of literary criticism from Antiquity to early Modern period. Introduction to major theoretical definitions of literature and modes of practical criticism. Close study of Aristotle's Poetics, Sidney's Apology for Poetry, Pope's Essay on Criticism, Coleridge's Biographia Literaria, Eliot's essays and other landmark works in development of literary criticism.

ENG 541 Literary and Cultural Theory 3.

A survey of literary theory in the 20th century from New Criticism to postmodernism. Examines the virtues and pitfalls of these approaches to the study of culture and literature. A course on issues, concepts, theorists and the sociohistorical and political context in which the theorists are writing. Taught in English. No formal pre-requisites. However, students who have not had advanced literature will be disadvantaged.

ENG 548 African-American Literature 3.

Survey of African-American literature and its relationships to American culture, with an emphasis on fiction and poetry since 1945. Writers such as Bontemps, Morrison, Hurston, Baldwin, Hayden, Brooks, Naylor, Harper, and Dove.

ENG 549 Modern African Literature 3.

The works of the most important writers shaping modern African literature in English (and English translation). Selections from East, West, North and South Africa, spanning colonial through post-colonial Africa--from literature of protest and culture conflict to that of disillusionment, reappraisal and feminism.

ENG 550 English Romantic Period 3.

A detailed study of the six major romantic poets--Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats; some attention as well to the political, social and literary background and to a few minor writers and critics.

ENG 551 Chaucer 3.
Prerequisite: ENG 451, Graduate standing.

Intensive study of the works of Chaucer in the light of medieval literary traditions, medieval history and a variety of medieval and modern critical approaches.

ENG 554 Contemporary Rhetorical Theory 3.

Contemporary rhetorical theory covering the 20th and 21st centuries. Conceptual connections with and disruptions of the classical tradition and its, successors; relationship between rhetorical theory and philosophical trends, institutional histories, socioeconomic circumstances, and pedagogical needs. Attention to current issues such as the revival of invention, rhetorical agency, and ethics.

ENG 555 American Romantic Period 3.

The literary culture of the United States from 1820s through 1860s, setting works of transcendentalists and other romantic writers within sociohistorical contexts. Consideration of writing by women, slave narratives and popular fiction as well as such major figures as Emerson, Hawthorne, Thoreau and Melville.

ENG 558 Studies In Shakespeare 3.

An intensive study of a particular phase of the Shakespeare canon. Emphasis will normally be on one dramatic genre (tragedy, comedy, history), but occasionally the focus may be more limited.

ENG 560 Victorian Poetry and Critical Prose 3.

The literature of Victorian England: 1837-1901; the major poets and essayists, movements and questions in their historical contexts, religious, political and aesthetic.

ENG 561 Milton 3.

An intensive reading of Milton with attention to background materials in history and culture of seventeenth-century England.

ENG 562 18TH-Century English Literature 3.

British writers of the period 1600-1790 studied in historical and cultural contexts. Usually includes works by Dryden, Swift, Pope, Defoe, Mandeville, Boswell and Johnson, but addition of other significant writers possible.

ENG 563 18TH-Century English Novel 3.

Selected British novels of the Restoration and eighteenth century from a variety of contemporary critical perspectives. Such writers as Fielding, Richardson, Sterne, Burney, Smollett and Austen.

ENG 564 Victorian Novel 3.

Study of selected British novels published between 1837 and 1901 in contexts of the development of the genre, historical period and current literary theory. Such writers as Dickens, Thackeray, Bronte, Trollope, Eliot, Meredith and Hardy.

ENG 565 American Realism and Naturalism 3.

Study of literary culture of United States from 1860s to early 1900s with emphasis on fiction by such realists and naturalists as Twain, Howells, Chesnutt, James, Crane, Wharton, Dreiser and Norris. Inclusion of prose of writers such as Adams and DuBois possible.

ENG 570 20TH-Century British Prose 3.

Examination of British fiction of this century and relationship of significant intellectual, historical and political issues. Inclusion of such writers as Joyce, Conrad, Woolf, Lawrence, Beckett and Murdoch possible but also post-colonial novelists as well.

ENG 571 20TH-Century British Poetry 3.

Development of English poetry from its late Victorian phase through Modernism to present post-war scene. Inclusion of such writers as Hardy, Yeats, Eliot, Smith, Auden, Larkin, Heaney, Wolcott and Hill possible.

ENG 572 Modern British Drama 3.

Survey of modern British drama from its beginnings at turn of the century to present.

ENG 573 Modern American Drama 3.

A survey of modern American drama centering on major figures.

ENG 575 Southern Writers 3.

Introduction to literary culture of "the South," tracing the roots of the twentieth-century "Southern Renaissance" in such ante-bellum genres as plantation fiction, Southwestern humor, fugitive-slave narration and pastoral elegy. Examination of persistence of "Southern" writing within increasingly standardized culture of the United States.

ENG 576 20TH-Century American Poetry 3.

Development of modern American poetry from rebellion against the romantic and genteel verse of the 1890's; special attention to Robinson, Frost, Pound, Williams, Stevens and Ransom.

ENG 577 20th-Century American Prose 3.

An examination of representative American writers of novel and short fiction.

ENG 578 English Drama To 1642 3.
Prerequisite: ENG 261 and upper division or Graduate standing.

Elizabethan and Jacobean drama from 1580 to 1642, excluding Shakespeare. Coverage of such writers as Marlowe, Jonson, Webster, Beaumont and Fletcher, Heywood, Tourneur and Ford.

ENG 579 Restoration and 18th-Century Drama 3.

Representative British plays of the period 1660-1780 studied in cultural, social and ethical contexts. Usually includes works by Etherege, Wycherley, Behn, Dry-den, Otway, Vanburgh, Farquhar, Congreve, Lillo, Gay, Goldsmith and Sheridan.

ENG 580 Literary Postmodernism 3.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Post-1945 literary theory in relationship with representative avant-garde writers. Theoretical and argumentative essays in such areas as chaos theory, deconstruction, feminism and the limits of fiction. Fiction readings by Calvino, Pynchon, Barthelme, Cortazar and others.

ENG 581 Visual Rhetoric: Theory and Criticism 3.
R: Graduate Students Only.

Application of visual theory to rhetoric and of rhetorical theory to visual forms of communication. Discussion and analysis may include advertising, photography, news and informational media, political communication, instructional material, scientific visualization, visual arts, public commemorative artifacts, internet and other digital media.

ENG 582 Studies in Literature 3.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Variation in content. Selected problems and issues in literature.

ENG 583 Studies In Rhetoric and Writing 3.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Variation in content. Selected problems and issues in rhetoric and writing.

ENG 584 Studies In Linguistics 3.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Variation in content. Selected problems and issues in linguistics.

ENG 585 Studies In Film 3.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Variation in content. Selected problems and issues in film.

ENG 586 Studies In Theory 3.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Variation in content. Selected problems and issues in theory.

ENG 587 Interdisciplinary Studies in English 3.

Content varies. Selected topics and issues that cross disciplinary boundaries in English Studies. May be repeated for credit with different topics.Graduate standing is required.

ENG 588 Fiction Writing Workshop 3.
Prerequisite: ENG 488 or ENG 489.

Advanced work in techniques of writing fiction for students with substantial experience in writing. Workshop sessions with students commenting on each other's work.

ENG 589 Poetry Writing Workshop 3.
Prerequisite: ENG 488 or ENG 489.

Advanced work in techniques of writing poetry for students with substantial experience in writing. Workshop sessions with students commenting on each other's work.

ENG 590 Studies In Creative Writing 3.
Prerequisite: ENG 588 or 589.

Techniques special to a particular kind of writing within the traditional genres of prose, poetry or drama, such as "Speculative Fiction" or "The Long Poem or Poetic Sequence." Various subjects.

ENG 591 Studies in National Cinemas 3.

Aesthetic develpments and historical importance of national cinema traditions in specific cultural contexts. Focus on the relation between cinema and linguistic, literary and artistic develpments within a national setting or in regional or international contexts. Topics, which change each year, may include Italian Neorealism, French New Wave, and British Social Realism.

ENG 592 Special Topics in Film Styles and Genres 1-6.

Critical approaches to focused film topics involving film genres, directorial styles, or trends within a national cinema. Topics will vary from semester to semester. Students cannot obtain credit for both ENG 492 and ENG 592.

ENG 610 Special Topics English 1-6.

ENG 624 Teaching College Composition 3.
Prerequisite: ENG 511 and mentored assistantship in ENG 101.

Preparation for teaching college composition. Introduction to pedagogical principles and practices. Practice in setting course goals, designing writing assignments to meet those goals, developing instructional activities to support assignments, andevaluating student writing. The course is scheduled as a 5-day workshop before classes begin, followed by weekly meetings and mentoring during the fall semester.

ENG 626 Advanced Writing for Empirical Research 3.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

A seminar and workshop for graduate students in empirical research fields working on grant proposals, theses and dissertations, papers for professional journals, conference proposals, and other significant research texts. Intensive practice and feedback on writing, grounded in an introduction to theory and research on writing processes, products, and contexts. Requirements include three major writing projects designed by the student, review and discussion of drafts written by other workshop members, analysis and presentation of discipline-specific communication patterns and practices.

ENG 636 Directed Readings 1-6.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Intensive study of a specific topic from various specializations of the English faculty. Negotiation between the student and the director for variable credit and approved by Director of Graduate Studies.

ENG 669 Bibliography and Methodology 1-3.

Intensive study of the bibliography and methodology of literary research. Required of all graduate students in English.

ENG 675 Projects in Technical Communication 3.
Prerequisite: ENG 518.

Capstone course for M.S. in Technical Communication. Students engage in major semester-long individual project under direction of instructor.

ENG 676 Master's Project in English 3.

Individual capstone project in English Studies. Topic and mode of study determined in consultation with faculty project advisor. For students in the final semester of the English MA program.

ENG 685 Master's Supervised Teaching 1-3.
Prerequisite: Master's student.

Teaching experience under the mentorship of faculty who assist the student in planning for the teaching assignment, observe and provide feedback to the student during the teaching assignment, and evaluate the student upon completion of the assignment.

ENG 688 Non-Thesis Masters Continuous Registration - Half Time Registration 1.
Prerequisite: Master's student.

For students in non-thesis master's programs who have completed all credit hour requirements for their degree but need to maintain half-time continuous registration to complete incomplete grades, projects, final master's exam, etc.

ENG 690 Master's Examination 1-9.
Prerequisite: Master's student.

For students in non thesis master's programs who have completed all other requirements of the degree except preparing for and taking the final master's exam.

ENG 693 Master's Supervised Research 1-9.
Prerequisite: Master's student.

Instruction in research and research under the mentorship of a member of the Graduate Faculty.

ENG 695 Master's Thesis Research 1-9.
Prerequisite: Master's student.

Thesis research.

ENG 696 Summer Thesis Research 1.
Prerequisite: Master's student.

For graduate students whose programs of work specify no formal course work during a summer session and who will be devoting full time to thesis research.

ENG 699 Master's Thesis Preparation 1-9.
Prerequisite: Master's student.

For students who have completed all credit hour requirements and full-time enrollment for the master's degree and are writing and defending their theses.

ENG 722 Linguistics and Literacy 3.
Prerequisite: ENG 525.

Focus on two-way relationship between linguistic theory and literacy. Metalinguistic awareness and acquisition of literacy, orthography and phonology, oral vs. written language, oral vs. literate cultures, and metalinguistic assumptions in linguistic theory.

ENG 727 Discourse Analysis 3.

Overview of major issues, theories, and research methods in contemporary discourse analysis. It explores how language as a form of social practice regulates social actions, relations and identities; how ways of speaking construct and are constructed by social order, cultural practice, and individual agency. Texts/discourses are analyzed to examine how speakers create meaning through formal linguistic choices; what the micro-organization of talk reveals about social order; how critical understanding of discourse helps to interpret complex processes of social life.

ENG 729 Language Variation and Social Theory 3.
Prerequisite: ENG 523.

Although the field of sociolinguistic variation has developed its own body of theory, its central questions continue to call for engagement with theory in related socio-cultural disciplines. This course examines sociolinguists' explicit and implicit incorporation of social theory into the analysis of language variation; it also explores the many ways in which social theory could yet enrich, and be enriched by, empirical sociolinguistic analysis.

ENG 730 Ethnolinguistic Variation 3.
Prerequisite: ENG 525.

This course examines the nature of ethnolinguistic variation in the English-speaking diaspora, with particular attention to the ethnic varieties in the United States, including African American English, Hispanic English, and Native American English.

ENG 731 Applied Sociolinguistics 3.
Prerequisite: ENG 525.

This course will introduce the main research concentrations and methods in Applied Sociolinguistics, including first language acquisition and teaching, second language learning, bilingualism, and clinical assessment and treatment of communication disorders. Students will be introduced to the basic foundations of language variation from linguistic and sociocultural/historical perspectives and learn how sociolinguistic variation affects clinical and educational processes and organizations.

ENG 798 Special Topics in English Studies 3-6.

Intensive exploration of specialized or emerging topics in an area of language, literature, rhetoric, film, or other aspect of English studies. Emphasis on student research and writing. May be used to test and develop new courses. May be repeated for credit.

ENG 810 Directed Readings in English Studies 1-6.

Intensive study of a specific topic from various specializations of the English faculty. Negotiation between the student and the director for the variable credit and approved by the director of Graduate Studies. May be repeated for credit.

ENG 896 Summer Dissert Res 1.