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Forestry (FOR)

FOR - Forestry Courses

FOR 150 Critical Thinking and Data Analysis 2.

Exploration and practical experience with basis for making resource management decisions. Learning to pose questions that drive research and analysis. Discovering differences between found and built answers. Examining spreadsheet structure and functionality for manipulating data. Establishing solid grounds for conclusions and actions in natural resources contexts. Experiencing thinking processes from posing questions to articulating well-founded answers in coherent, persuasive discourse.

FOR 172 Forest System Mapping and Mensuration I 2.

Concepts and application of basic forest and land resource measurement techniques used in forestry and related fields. Measuring distances and areas; orienteering; basic air photo and topographic map interpretation; introduction to GPS; measuring tree characteristics; introduction to forest sampling. Application of spreadsheets and word processing to analyze and summarize resource characteristics. Field trip required.

FOR 204 Silviculture 2.

Silvical characteristics and growth requirements of forest trees; dynamics of stand growth, species-site relationships, site productivity, forest pest interactions, hydrology and nutrient cycling in forest ecosystems; emphasis on understanding and applying ecological principles to the production of multiple benefits at the forest community level.

FOR 220 Urban and Community Forestry 3.

Introduction to the interdisciplinary study of urban forestry and greenspaces. Study of urban forest history, distribution and ownership patterns, urban ecology and ecosystems, benefits and uses of urban forests, vegetation establishment and maintenance, urban planning and policy, community interactions, urban forestry implementation.

FOR 248 Forest History, Technology and Society 3.

Examining forest resource use and issues throughout history. Tracing developments and concepts that created the context for today's issues concerning global forest resources. Examining how wood resource availability shaped civilization's development, and examining consequences on forest resources of civilization's scientific, social, and technological progress.

FOR 250 Professional Development II: Communications in Natural Resources 1.

Development of written and oral communication skills for forestry and natural resources management. Discussion topics include interactive communication, writing to a target audience, common pitfalls in technical writing, various kinds of technical writing, poster and oral presentations, reviewing and revising writing, and responding to questions in a professional manner.

FOR 252 Introduction to Forest Science 3.
Not open to Forest Management Majors (15FOMND,15FORMTBS, 15FGM).

Integration of biological principles into studies of tree growth, reproduction, establishment, survival, and disturbance. Discussions of regional silviculture and of effects of humans on forest ecosystems. Instruction in forest sampling and tree identification. Many laboratories meet outdoors.Not open to Forest Management majors.

FOR 260 Forest Ecology 4.

Introduction to forest ecosystems, their structure and functions, and the processes that regulate them including: radiation, temperature, water, and biogeochemistry; productivity; plant populations; forest communities; succession; natural disturbances; and human influences.Must have a strong love of trees.

FOR 261 Forest Communities 2.
Prerequisite: FOR 339 or PB 220 or PB 403.

Study of the species composition, distribution, site requirements, and succession of the principal forest communities of southeastern North America. Identification of important member plant species. Field trips to typical examples.

FOR 264 Forest Wildlife 1.

Diversity of fauna that inhabits forest communities in the Piedmont of North Carolina. Inventory terrestrial and aquatic habitats and identify various vertebrate and invertebrate species. Insect collection initiated. The life histories of representative species presented.

FOR 265 Fire Management 1.

Effects of wildfire and prescribed fire on forest ecosystem components and processes; fire behavior and the ecosystem and meterologic factors that affect it; silvicultural uses of fire; organization, equipment, and tactics for wildfire suppression; fire suppression exercises on the North Carolina Division of Forest Resources' Forest Fire Simulator.

FOR 273 Forest System Mapping and Mensuration II 3.
Prerequisite: FOR 172.

Procedures and Instruments for measuring various tree and stand characteristics. Determination of stem volume and taper. Planning and implementation of forest resource samples to provide population estimates using fixed-radius and variable-radius sampling. Detailed coverage of land measurements and mapping of boundary surveys. Use of aerial photography, topographic maps, and GPS to aid in resource assessment. Incorporation of inventory data into a GIS. Basic statistical concepts applied to resource measurements. Taught off-campus at Hill Forest.

FOR 293 Independent Study in Forest Management 1-6.

Independent Study for Forest Management students at the freshman and sophomore level developed under the direction of a faculty member. Individualized/Independent Study and Research courses require a "Course Agreement for Students Enrolled in Non-Standard Courses" be completed by the student and faculty member prior to registration by the department.

FOR 294 Independent Study in Forest Management 1-6.

Independent Study for Forest Management students at the freshman and sophomore level developed under the direction of a faculty member. Individualized/Independent Study and Research courses require a "Course Agreement for Students Enrolled in Non-Standard Courses" be completed by the student and faculty member prior to registration by the department.

FOR 295 Special Topics in Forestry 1-6.

Study of forestry topics not covered in existing courses at the introductory level. Development of a new course on a trial basis.

FOR 303 Silvics and Forest Tree Physiology 3.
P: (CH 101 or 103) and [(CH 201 and 202) or (CH 203 and 204) or PY 205 or PY 211].

Ecological and physiological processes influencing establishment, growth, and development of forest stands with particular emphasis on forest types of Southeastern United States; influence of resource availability on forest stand productivity; physical and biochemical processes associated with tree function, including water relations, mineral nutrition, transport and translocation, photosynthesis, respiration; internal and environmental factors regulating tree growth and development.

FOR 304 Theory of Silviculture 4.
Prerequisite: FOR 260 or PB 360 or AEC 360.

Ecological processes affecting the establishment and growth of forest stands with particular emphasis on forest types of the Southeastern United States. Forest stand productivity, how productivity is influenced by site, stand, climatic factors, and the application of site specific prescriptions to establish and manipulate the composition, growth, and health of forest stands.

FOR 318 Forest Pathology 3.
Prerequisite: PB 200.

Major diseases of forest trees and deterioration of wood products emphasizing principles of plant pathology; diagnosis; nature, physiology, ecology, and dissemination of disease-causing agents; mechanisms of pathogenesis; epidemiology and environmental influences; principles and practices of control.

FOR 319 Forest Economics 3.
Prerequisite: ARE 201 or EC 205 or EC 201.

Economic approaches for evaluating the production and costs of forest management, timber harvesting activities, and nontimber forest products. Estimating the financial returns of long-term investments in timber or other forest resources, including discounted cash flow analysis and capital budgeting techniques. Property taxes and income tax treatment of timber and their effects on investment returns. Demand estimation and timber supply analyses.

FOR 330 North Carolina Forests 3.

An introduction and overview of forests in North Carolina with emphasis on the importance of forests in the 21st century. Topics include: history and distribution of forests, soils-sit relationships, forestry practices, non-conventional management objectives. Two required Saturday field trips.

FOR 334 Operations Research Applications in Natural Resources 1.

Introduction to the application and use of management science in forestry and natural resources. The course will introduce decision and information theory and mathematical programming techniques including linear, non-linear and integer programming concepts. The emphasis is on problem formulation and solution using computer programs. Half semester course.

FOR 339 Dendrology 4.

Identification and elementary silvics of woody plants of eastern North America with studies of their classification, characteristics, and habitats. Consideration of trees from northern and western North America and the Caribbean region. Field identification with trips to forest communities.

FOR 350 Professional Development III: Ethical Dilemmas in Natural Resource Management 1.
Prerequisite: Junior standing..

Study of ethical issues confronting natural resource management professionals, including: biodiversity conservation, private property rights, traditional religion and ecological values, community rights, environmental racism, hunting and animal rights, business ethics, and the purpose and content of professional codes of ethics.

FOR 353 Air Photo Interpretation and Photogrammetry 3.
Prerequisite: MA 114 or MA 121or MA 131 or MA 141.

Theory, principles, and techniques of utilizing air photos for inventory and management of renewable resources, photogrammetric and engineering applications, hydrologic and terrain analysis, and land use/cover mapping. Introduction to remote sensing and use of color infrared, thermal, Skylab, and Lands at imagery in resource mapping.

FOR 374 Forest Measurement, Modeling, and Inventory 3.
Prerequisite: FOR 273.

Mathematical functions required for quantifying the yield of timber and non-timber products. Procedures for planning, conducting, and analyzing forest inventories. Use of mathematical models to estimate growth and yield of forest stands and non-timber products for management decisions.

FOR 402 Forest Entomology 3.
Prerequisite: Junior standing..

Fundamentals of morphology, classification, biology, ecology and control of insects attacking trees, with emphasis on silvicultural practices.

FOR 405 Forest Management 4.
Prerequisite: FOR 304, FOR 319, FOR 374.

Fundamental principles and analytical techniques necessary in the planning, management and optimization of forest operations. Formulation of objectives and constraints, yield forecasting, forest regulation, procurement and marketing, inventory methods, and management plan preparation. Written and oral reporting.

FOR 406 Forest Inventory, Analysis and Planning 4.
Prerequisite: FOR 405, FOR 460.

Independent project in designing and implementing a multi-resource survey; analyze stand conditions; forecast growth, yield and revenue of timber and forest products; use linear programming to prepare a long-term management plan subject to economic,social, and ecological constraints; assess economic and environmental impacts of potential actions; and report results orally and in writing.

FOR 408 Hardwood Management 3.
Prerequisite: FOR 204 or Junior Standing.

Examines characteristics of and requirements for successfully manipulating stands of deciduous trees to meet specific economic, habitat and social objectives. Analyzes biological and site physical factors that affect growth and yield potential, opportunities for operational activities and expected results. Compares differences among deciduous species that affect responses to silvicultural stand manipulation.

FOR 411 Forest Tree Genetics and Biology 3.
Prerequisite: Junior standing.

Genetics as it is applied in forest management for both conifers and hardwoods. The variation, evolution and genetics of forest trees. Methods for selection, breeding, seed production, and vegetative propagation. Exotics, wood properties, and tree improvement as a forest management tool.

FOR 414 World Forestry 3.

Management of global forest resources; distribution and trends in forest cover; role of forests in economic development; international production and trade of forest products; current policy issues, including tropical deforestation, certification, and carbon sequestration; social forestry and non-timber forest products; international institutions and aid for conservation and development; identification and evaluation of sources of current information on global forestry issues.

FOR 415 World Forestry Study Tour 1.
Corequisite: FOR 414.

Field trip to Mexico and/or Central America for seven days over spring break. Examine tropical forestry issues through field visits to timber concessions, plantations, nurseries, wood products firms, protected areas, and agroforestry projects; meetings with representatives of forest research institutes, government agencies, timber industry, cooperatives, and environmental organizations; and interaction with local people. Fee for field trip determined annually.Offered during spring break, as aone week field trip to Mexico and/or Central America.

FOR 420 Watershed and Wetlands Hydrology 4.
Prerequisite: SSC 200 and (FOR 260 or PB 360 or AEC 360).

Principles of hydrologic science; classification and assessment of watersheds and stream networks; hydrologic, erosion, and water quality processes in natural and managed watersheds; wetlands hydrology; hydrologic measurements and data analysis; applications of hydrology and water quality management for forest agriculture, and urban ecosystems; watershed restoration. Emphasis field study of watersheds and hydrologic measurements. Two weekend field trips are required. Credit will not be given for both FOR(NR)420 and FOR(NR)520.

FOR 422 Consulting Forestry 3.
Prerequisite: Senior standing in Forest Management.

Forest land acquisition and ownership: ownership, appraisal, legal considerations, financial management and planning. Producing forest resources: timber, wildlife, recreation, farm products, water, minerals, specialty products, and development. Marketing forest resources: timber, recreation, farm leases, minerals, specialty products, and developed property. Forest resources consulting: forms of organization, pricing of services, consultant client relationships (Law of Agency), professional ethics and continuing education.

FOR 430 Forest Health and Protection 3.
Prerequisite: PB 200 or BIO 181 or BIO 183 or FOR 260 or BIO 360 or PB 360 (or other Biology or Plant Biology course)..

This course will introduce students to the major insect and disease problems of North American forests, both native and introduced, with an emphasis on the recognition and management of pests and the damage they cause. Wild land fire, invasive plants, and climate change and their interactions with forest insect and diseases will also be covered.

FOR 434 Forest Operations and Analysis 3.
Junior standing or above.

Management science and operational techniques in forestry. Logging road layout and construction, and machine systems: harvesting machine optimization and selection. Harvesting, production and forest planning. Decision and inventory theory, and other techniques for solving problems typically encountered in forest operations management. Required overnight weekend field trip.

FOR 450 Professional Development IV: Leadership 1.
Prerequisite: Junior standing..

Concepts and applications of leadership principles with emphasis on leadership challenges and opportunities for professionals in natural resources management. Assessment and development of leadership skills.

FOR 491 Special Topics in Forestry and Related Natural Resources 1-4.

Independent (or group) study or research of a forestry or related natural resources topic with a faculty supervisor of the student's choice. Also courses offered on a trial basis.

FOR 493 Independent Study in Forest Management 1-6.

Independent Study for Forest Management students at the advanced level developed under the direction of a faculty member. Individualized/Independent Study and Research courses require a "Course Agreement for Students Enrolled in Non-Standard Courses" be completed by the student and faculty member prior to registration by the department.

FOR 494 Independent Study in Forest Management 1-6.

Independent Study for Forest Management students at the advanced level developed under the direction of a faculty member. Individualized/Independent Study and Research courses require a "Course Agreement for Students Enrolled in Non-Standard Courses" be completed by the student and faculty member prior to registration by the department.

FOR 501 Dendrology 3.
Prerequisite: PB 200.

Identification and natural history of eastern woody species with studies of their taxonomic classification, physical characteristics, and typical habits. Laboratories stress sight recognition and use of identification keys and trips to natural forest communities.

FOR 502 Forest Measurements 1.

One-third semester mini-course. Forest measurements covering principles, terminology, and practical field applications. Land area measurement, units of timber measure (cubic feet, cords, weight, board feet), estimating volume of standing trees, sampling techniques for forest inventory (strips, plots, points), measures of site quality and stand density, methods for projecting future timber volumes.

FOR 503 Tree Physiology 1.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

One-third semester mini-course. Fundamental principles of physiological processes in forest trees affecting tree and stand growth and development in natural forests and managed plantations. Concepts of whole plant physiological processes includingphotosynthesis, respiration, water relations, nutrition, periodic growth, sexual and vegetative reproduction, and seedling quality with forestry examples of each process.

FOR 504 The Practice of Silviculture 3.

The theory and practice of stand regeneration, controlling composition, intermediate treatments and growth; application of the knowledge of silvics in the management of stands. Emphasis on forest communities of North America. Co-requisite course is FOR 506: Silviculture Laboratory (Optional).

FOR 505 Forest Management 4.

Fundamental principles and analytical techniques necessary in the planning, management and optimization of forest operations. Formulation of objectives and constraints, yield forecasting, forest regulation, procurement and marketing, inventory methods, and management plan preparation. Written and oral reporting.

FOR 506 Silviculture Laboratory 1.
Corequisite: FOR 504.

Development of site specific prescriptions to establish stands for a wide variety of objectives, including fiber, water, wildlife, recreation and health. Emphasis on forest communities of North America.

FOR 507 Silviculture Mini Course 1.

One-third semester mini-course. A condensed version of silviculture. Ecological processed affecting establishment and growth of forest stands with particular emphasis on forest types of southeastern United States. Forest stand productivity, how productivity influenced by site, stand, climatic factors, and application of site specific prescriptions to establish and manipulate composition, growth, and health of forest stands.

FOR 508 Hardwood Management 3.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Examines characteristics of and requirements for successfully manipulating stands of deciduous trees to meet specific economic, habitat and social objectives. Analyzes biological and site physical factors that affect growth and yield potential, opportunities for operational activities and expected results. Compares differences among deciduous species that affect responses to silvicultural stand manipulation.

FOR 509 Forest Resource Policy 1.

One-third semester mini-course. Principles of forest policies and processes. Political processes, institutional and interest group participation, forestry laws and programs, current issues, and policy analyses.

FOR 510 Introduction to GPS 1.

One-third semester mini-course. Introduction to collection and use of mapping grade global positioning satellite systems data. Includes review of cartographic properties, mission planning, hands-on collection of GPS points, lines, and areas, differential correction, editing, and exporting GPS files to a GIS.

FOR 513 Silviculture for Intensively Managed Plantations 3.
Prerequisite: FOR 507.

This course provides an up-to-date understanding of the ecological and physiological bases of forest stand productivity and a silvicultural systems framework to use this knowledge for making site specific prescriptions that are cost effective and environmentally sustainable.

FOR 519 Forest Economics 3.
Prerequisite: Basic course in economics.

Economics applied to problems in forest management, including timber demand and supply models, optimal rotation length, benefit-cost analysis of forestry projects, impacts of forest taxation and consideration of non-market forest goods and services.

FOR 520 Watershed and Wetlands Hydrology 4.
Prerequisite: SSC 200 and (FOR 260 or PB 360 or AEC 360).

Principles of hydrologic science; classification and assessment of watersheds and stream networks; hydrologic, erosion, and water quality processes in natural and managed watersheds; wetlands hydrology; hydrologic measurements and data analysis; applications of hydrology and water quality management for forest agriculture, and urban ecosystems; watershed restoration. Emphasis field study of watersheds and hydrologic measurements. Two weekend field trips are required. Credit will not be given for both FOR(NR)420 and FOR(NR)520.

FOR 522 Consulting Forestry 3.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Forest land acquisition and ownership: ownership, appraisal, legal considerations, financial management and planning. Producing forest resources: timber, wildlife, recreation, farm products, water, minerals, specialty products, and development. Marketing forest resources: timber, recreation, farm leases, minerals, specialty products, and developed property. Forest resources consulting: forms of organization, pricing of services, consultant client relationships (Law of Agency), professional ethics and continuing education.

FOR 531 Wildland Fire Science 3.

Physical, chemical, biological, and ecological processes associated with wildland fire, particular emphasis on fire behavior, fuels, weather, climate and the associated effects on ecology, management, fire suppression, prescribed fire, and smoke emissions and exposure. Fire's effect on national policy, social and natural history of North America. In-depth exercises in fire and smoke modeling using established predictive systems.

FOR 532 Wildland Firefighter 3.

National Wildfire Coordination Group Firefighter Type II Certification, including study of the National Incident Command Systems (ICS-100), Human Dimensions in the Wildland Fire Service (L-180) Introduction to Wildland Fire Behavior (S-190), Firefighting Safety and Training (S-130). Weekly reading seminar, lectures and problem sessions. Last 4 weeks of semester will be prescribed fire planning and field implementation of methodologies learned in course.

FOR 534 Forest Operations and Analysis 3.

Management science and operational techniques in forestry. Logging road layout and construction, and machine systems: harvesting machine optimization and selection. Harvesting, production and forest planning. Decision and inventory theory, and other techniques for solving problems typically encountered in forest operations management. Required overnight weekend field trip.

FOR 540 Advanced Dendrology 3.
Prerequisite: BO 403 or FOR 339.

Identification and life histories of native and naturalized woody plants. Use of taxonomic manuals and literature. Identification of problematic groups. Concentration on North America, with discussion of other continents. Overnight field trips to natural forest communities.

FOR 561 Forest Communities of the Southeastern Coastal Plain 1.
Prerequisite: FOR 212, FOR 501.

Species composition, distribution, site requirements, and succession of principal forest communities of southeastern Coastal Plain. Identification of important member plant species. Overnight field trips to typical examples.

FOR 562 Forest Communities of the Southern Appalachians 1.
Prerequisite: FOR 212, FOR 501.

Species composition, distribution, site requirements, and succession of principal forest communities of southern Appalachians. Identification of important member plant species. Overnight field trips to typical examples.

FOR 574 Forest Mensuration and Modeling 3.
Prerequisite: ST 511 or equivalent; College Calculus preferred.

Study of mathematical functions required for quantifying the yield of timber and non-timber products. Procedures for planning, conducting, and analyzing forest inventories, use of mathematical models to estimate growth and yield of forest stands and non-timber products for management decisions.

FOR 575 Advanced Terrestrial Ecosystem Ecology 3.

Views organisms and physical environment as integrated system. Outlines processes governing assimilation and cycling of energy, carbons, nutrients, and water. Evaluates ecosystem responses to intensive management, global climate change, air pollution, biofuels production, fragmentation, large-scale land use change. Illustrates application of ecosystem science approach to important regional and global questions through scaling of empirical, ecosystem-level data, ongoing research. Provides experience in hypothesis testing and experimental design, data analysis and interpretation, proposal development, and publication for research professionals. Graduate Standing.

FOR 583 Tropical Forestry 3.
Prerequisite: Senior standing.

Principles of tropical ecology, dendrology and agroforestry. Primary emphasis on establishment and management of tropical plantations with lesser emphasis on natural stands. Operation and management of tropical nurseries.

FOR 595 Special Topics 1-6.

Individual students or groups of students, under direction of a faculty member, may explore topics of special interest not covered by existing courses. Format may consist of readings and independent study, problems or research not related to thesis.Also used to develop and test new 500-level courses.

FOR 601 Graduate Seminar 1.

Weekly seminar in which students registered for course present the results of research and special projects. Invitation to all graduate students and faculty in department to attend and join discussion.

FOR 603 Research Methods in Forestry and Environmental Resources 1.
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Philosophy and objectives of scientific research and steps in the research process. Basic and applied research, inductive and deductive reasoning and need for hypothesis development and testing as a basis for scientific research. Special emphasis on preparation of study plans, graduate theses, published articles and technical presentations.

FOR 610 Special Topics In Forestry 1-6.

Individual students or groups of students, under direction of a faculty member, may explore topics of special interest not covered by existing courses. Format may consist of readings and independent study, problems or research not related to thesis.Also used to develop and test new 500-level courses.Credits Arranged.

FOR 620 Woodland Stewardship 3.

An introduction and overview of non-industrial private forestry in the Southeast United States with emphasis on active forest management. Topics include history of human impact on forests, evolution of forest, forestry practices, timber and non timber management objectives, financial aspects of forest land management, and management planning. One required all day field trip.

FOR 630 Independent Study in Forestry 1.

Independent study in Forestry under the supervision of a Forestry and Environmental Resources faculty member. Restricted to graduate students in the Department of Forestry and Environmental Resources with consent of the supervising faculty. May not be taken in the first semester of graduate study.

FOR 685 Master's Supervised Teaching 1-3.
Prerequisite: Master's student.

Teaching experience under the mentorship of faculty who assist the student in planning for the teaching assignment, observe and provide feedback to the student during the teaching assignment, and evaluate the student upon completion of the assignment.

FOR 688 Non-Thesis Masters Continuous Registration - Half Time Registration 1.
Prerequisite: Master's student.

For students in non-thesis master's programs who have completed all credit hour requirements for their degree but need to maintain half-time continuous registration to complete incomplete grades, projects, final master's exam, etc.

FOR 689 Non-Thesis Master Continuous Registration - Full Time Registration 3.
Prerequisite: Master's student.

For students in non-thesis master's programs who have completed all credit hour requirements for their degree but need to maintain full-time continuous registration to complete incomplete grades, projects, final master's exam, etc. Students may register for this course a maximum of one semester.

FOR 690 Master's Examination 1-9.
Prerequisite: Master's student.

For students in non thesis master's programs who have completed all other requirements of the degree except preparing for and taking the final master's exam.

FOR 693 Master's Supervised Research 1-9.
Prerequisite: Master's student.

Instruction in research and research under the mentorship of a member of the Graduate Faculty.

FOR 695 Master's Thesis Research 1-9.
Prerequisite: Master's student.

Thesis research.

FOR 696 Summer Thesis Research 1.
Prerequisite: Master's student.

For graduate students whose programs of work specify no formal course work during a summer session and who will be devoting full time to thesis research.

FOR 699 Master's Thesis Preparation 1-9.
Prerequisite: Master's student.

For students who have completed all credit hour requirements and full-time enrollment for the master's degree and are writing and defending their theses.

FOR 713 Advanced Topics In Silviculture 3.
Prerequisite: FOR 304.

Critical examination of selected silvicultural topics, with special emphasis on concepts and phenomena distinguishing forests from other biotic communities and silviculture from other fields of applied biology. Emphasis on intensive silviculture in United States and selected international locations. A required written research proposal.

FOR 725 Forest Genetics 3.

Application of genetic principles to silviculture, management and wood utilization. Emphasis on variation in wild populations, the bases for selection of desirable qualities and fundamentals of controlled breeding.

FOR 726 Advanced Topics In Quantitative Genetics and Breeding 3.
Prerequisite: ST 511, Corequisite: ST 512.

Advanced topics in quantitative genetics pertinent to population improvement for quantitative and categorical traits with special applications to plant and animal breeding. DNA markers - phenotype associations. The theory and application of linear mixed models, BLUP and genomic selection using maximum likelihood and Bayesian approaches. Pedigree and construction of genomic relationships matrices from DNA markers and application in breeding.

FOR 727 Tree Improvement Research Techniques 3.
Prerequisite: FOR 411 or GN 411.

Research methods involved in forest tree breeding and genetics programs. Emphasis on laboratory, greenhouse and field research techniques. Stress also on summary and presentation of research results.

FOR 728 Quantitative Forest Genetics Methods 3.
Prerequisite: GN 703, ST 701.

Applications of basic quantitative genetic methods in forest tree breeding and genetic research. Principles and procedures for partitioning experimental variance, estimating genetic parameters from different mating and test designs. Predicting breeding value and gain and developing breeding strategies.

FOR 734 Advanced Forest Management Planning 3.
Prerequisite: FOR 405 or FOR 434 or OR 501, Corequisite: FOR 772.

History, principles, structures and use of modern forest management planning and decision-making techniques. Emphasis on optimization procedures and public forest management.

FOR 750 Ecological Restoration 3.
Prerequisite: BO 360, SSC 200, Corequisite: BO 565.

Historical bases and philosophical examination of concepts of ecosystem restoration. Mechanics of restoring soils, hydrology, plant community composition and structure, and landscape levels ecosystem functions. Quantitative evaluations of restoration success.

FOR 753 Environmental Remote Sensing 3.
Prerequisite: FOR 353.

Principles and applications of remote sensing technology to earth resources and environmental studies. Electromagnetic energy, data acquisition platforms, sensors and scanners, processing of digital remotely sensed data, error analysis and accuracyassessments, and integration of remotely sensed data with other data types used in natural resource management.

FOR 784 The Practice Of Environmental Impact Assessment 4.

Impact assessment principles, practices and their evolution. Lectures and field practicums concerning problems addressed by environmental assessment practitioners. Practical implications of current regulatory requirements, especially concerning endangered species and wetlands, as they affect environmental practitioners' performance. Required reports combine varied technical tasks and documentation for regulatory process review.

FOR 795 Advanced Special Topics in Forestry 1-6.

Individual students or groups of students, under direction of a faculty member, may explore topics of special interest not covered by existing courses. Format may consist of readings and independent study, problems or research not related to thesis.Also used to develop and test new 700-level courses.

FOR 801 Seminar 1.

Weekly seminar in which students registered for course present the results of research and special projects. Invitation to all graduate students and faculty in department to attend and join discussion.

FOR 803 Research Methods in Forestry and Environmental Resources 1.
Prerequisite: Grad. standing.

Philosophy and objectives of scientific research and steps in the research process. Basic and applied research, inductive and deductive reasoning and need for hypothesis development and testing as a basis for scientific research. Special emphasis onpreparation of study plans, graduate theses, published articles and technical presentations.

FOR 810 Special Topics In Forestry 1-6.

Individual students or groups of students, under direction of a faculty member, may explore topics of special interest not covered by existing courses. Format may consist of readings and independent study, problems or research not related to thesis.Also used to develop and test new 800-level courses.

FOR 885 Doctoral Supervised Teaching 1-3.
Prerequisite: Doctoral student.

Teaching experience under the mentorship of faculty who assist the student in planning for the teaching assignment, observe and provide feedback to the student during the teaching assignment, and evaluate the student upon completion of the assignment.

FOR 890 Doctoral Preliminary Exam 1-9.
Prerequisite: Doctoral student.

For students who are preparing for and taking written and/or oral preliminary exams.

FOR 893 Doctoral Supervised Research 1-9.
Prerequisite: Doctoral student.

Instruction in research and research under the mentorship of a member of the Graduate Faculty.

FOR 895 Doctoral Dissertation Research 1-9.
Prerequisite: Doctoral student.

Dissertation research.

FOR 896 Summer Dissertation Research 1.
Prerequisite: Doctoral student.

For graduate students whose programs of work specify no formal course work during a summer session and who will be devoting full time to thesis research.

FOR 899 Doctoral Dissertation Preparation 1-9.
Prerequisite: Doctoral student.

For students who have completed all credit hour, full-time enrollment, preliminary examination, and residency requirements for the doctoral degree, and are writing and defending their dissertations.