Zoology (ZO)

ZO - Zoology Courses

ZO 233 Human-Animal Interactions 3.

This course is designed to explore the relationship humans share with other animals and nature. We will study the early history of animal domestication and the influence of animals on human culture and religion. We will also explore our relationships to animals as pets, food, research subjects, and wildlife. All subjects will be covered through interaction with quest speaker, assigned readings, case studies, and class discussion.

ZO 250 Animal Anatomy and Physiology 4.

Roles of physical laws, environmental challenges, and evolutionary history in shaping animal structure and function. Selected examples from invertebrates and vertebrates. Laboratory in anatomy and physiology, hypothesis generation and testing and data analysis and presentation.

ZO 317 Primate Ecology and Evolution 3.

A comprehensive survey of the behavior, evolution, and ecology of nonhuman primates. Special emphasis will be placed in the evolution of cognitive abilities, social systems, and behavioral patterns that are unique to primates, including the evolution of language. Topics include primate taxonomy, evolution of the extant primates, geographic distribution, social behavior, reproductive behavior and strategies, parental behavior, communication, and cognitive. Classes will consist of interactive lectures, films, and class discussions.

ZO 333 Captive Animal Biology 3.

This course serves to introduce interested students to historical and current captive animal conservation efforts. We will discuss in detail a variety of issues essential to the management of wild animals in a captive setting including ethics, nutrition, reproduction, behavior, and population management.

ZO 334 Captive Animal Biology Field Laboratory 2.

This laboratory course serves to introduce interested students to today's captive animal conservation efforts from the perspective of NC facilities on the front lines. Through the lens of these nearby institutions, we will investigate in detail a variety of factors essential to the management of wild animals in a captive setting. We will take topics (history, population management, genetics, nutrition, education, conservation) from the lecture course and expand them as we focus on challenges unique to these local captive facilities. While some activities will take place on campus, a number of off-campus field trips are required, including one 3-day laboratory at North Carolina Zoo. We will return to campus most days within the scheduled time frame, however students should plan for the possibility that labs may go overtime on some occasions.

ZO 350 Animal Phylogeny and Diversity 4.

Phylogenetic history and adaptive radiation of animals; contrast of environmental determinants of biodiversity in tropical and polar regions; modern approaches to phylogeny; role of humans in influencing biodiversity. Students may not receive credit for both ZO 350 and BIO 140 or ZO 402.

ZO 402 Invertebrate Biology 4.

Over 90% of all animals are invertebrates, and many invertebrate species have proven extremely useful in medical and research applications. This course will survey invertebrate groups or clades (excluding the Protista), and will emphasize their functional biology, phylogeny, ecology, behavior, and use as models in research. Lab will emphasize an experimental approach and will involve work primarily with live material. Students may not receive credit for both ZO 402 and ZO 350.

ZO 410 Introduction to Animal Behavior 3.

Studies in animal behavior in vertebrates and invertebrates, focusing on the mechanisms and evolution of animal behavior. Topics include neural, hormonal, and genetic bases of behavior; foraging; anti-predator defenses; mating systems and sexual selection; social behavior; communication; parental care; territoriality and habitat selection.

ZO 444 Mammalogy 3.

The biology of mammals: evolution, functional morphology, reproduction, behavior, ecology, population biology, classification and identification. One weekend field trip planned. One independent field research project is required. Graduate students will prepare a full written report of their research projects, which will not be required of the undergraduates.

ZO 449 Principles of Biological Oceanography 3.

Environmental dependencies, biological productivity, and trophic relationships in plankton, nekton and benthos; Sampling methods and experimental design; Human impacts on marine systems.Credit is not allowed for both MEA 449 and MEA(ZO)549.

ZO 486 Capstone Course in Zoology 3.

Topical problems in zoology. BIO 486 provides a challenging opportunity for students to integrate and apply knowledge and skills gained from their major studies. Emphasis will be placed on collaborative learning and effective, professional communication. Topics and instructors will vary from semester to semester. Priority will initially be given to seniors in the SZO curriculum; other students with the necessary prerequisites will be admitted on a space available basis.

ZO 512 Animal Symbiosis 3.

Symbiotic associations of animals including mutualism, commensalism and parasitism. The morphological, physiological, behavioral and ecological adaptations of symbionts and the complex interactions between partner species.

ZO 513 Comparative Physiology 3.

Comparative study of the organ systems of vertebrates and physiological processes involved in maintaining homeostatic state. Various compensatory mechanisms employed during environmental stress included.

ZO 522 Biological Clocks 3.

The anatomy, physiology and development of biological clocks in a variety of organisms, including humans. Required readings in primary literature.

ZO 524 Comparative Endocrinology 3.

Basic concepts of endocrinology, including functions of major endocrine glands involved in processes of growth, metabolism and reproduction.

ZO 542 Herpetology 3.

The biology of the amphibians and reptiles: systematics, life history, anatomy, behavior, physiology and ecology.

ZO 544 Mammalogy 3.

The biology of mammals: evolution, functional morphology, reproduction, behavior, ecology, population biology, classification and identification. One weekend field trip planned. One independent field research project is required. Graduate students will prepare a full written report of their research projects, which will not be required of the undergraduates.

ZO 549 Principles of Biological Oceanography 3.

Environmental dependencies, biological productivity, and trophic relationships in plankton, nekton and benthos; Sampling methods and experimental design; Human impacts on marine systems.Credit is not allowed for both MEA 449 and MEA(ZO)549.

ZO 553 Principles Of Wildlife Science 3.

The principles of wildlife management and their application studied in the laboratory and in the field.

ZO 582 Medical and Veterinary Entomology 3.

The morphology, taxonomy, biology and control of the arthropod parasites and disease vectors of man and animals. The ecology and behavior of vectors in relation to disease transmission and control.

ZO 601 Seminar 1.

The presentation and defense of original research and current literature.

ZO 631 Special Topics 1-6.

A directed individual investigation of a particular problem in zoology, accompanied by a review of the pertinent literature. A maximum of three hours allowed toward master's degree.

ZO 685 Master's Supervised Teaching 1-3.

Teaching experience under the mentorship of faculty who assist the student in planning for the teaching assignment, observe and provide feedback to the student during the teaching assignment, and evaluate the student upon completion of the assignment.

ZO 688 Non-Thesis Masters Continuous Registration - Half Time Registration 1.

For students in non-thesis master's programs who have completed all credit hour requirements for their degree but need to maintain half-time continuous registration to complete incomplete grades, projects, final master's exam, etc.

ZO 689 Non-Thesis Master Continuous Registration - Full Time Registration 3.

For students in non-thesis master's programs who have completed all credit hour requirements for their degree but need to maintain full-time continuous registration to complete incomplete grades, projects, final master's exam, etc. Students may register for this course a maximum of one semester.

ZO 690 Master's Examination 1-9.

For students in non thesis master's programs who have completed all other requirements of the degree except preparing for and taking the final master's exam.

ZO 693 Master's Supervised Research 1-9.

Instruction in research and research under the mentorship of a member of the Graduate Faculty.

ZO 695 Master's Thesis Research 1-9.

Thesis research.

ZO 696 Summer Thesis Research 1.

For graduate students whose programs of work specify no formal course work during a summer session and who will be devoting full time to thesis research.

ZO 699 Research In Zoology 1-9.

Credits Arranged.

ZO 790 Special Topics 1-6.

ZO 791 Topics In Animal Behavior 3.

Intensive examination of selected aspects of animal behavior and their relationship to physiology, ecology and other biological fields. May be repeated for credit when topic changes.

ZO 802 Seminar In Biology Of Reproduction 2.

Current topics in animal reproduction presented by reproductive physiologists from various Research Triangle institutions. Student presentations of research projects or library projects in area of animal reproduction.

ZO 829 Special Topics 1-6.

A directed individual investigation of a particular problem in zoology, accompanied by a review of the pertinent literature. A maximum of three hours allowed toward master's degree.

ZO 831 Special Topics 1-6.

A directed individual investigation of a particular problem in zoology, accompanied by a review of the pertinent literature. A maximum of three hours allowed toward master's degree.

ZO 885 Doctoral Supervised Teaching 1-3.

Teaching experience under the mentorship of faculty who assist the student in planning for the teaching assignment, observe and provide feedback to the student during the teaching assignment, and evaluate the student upon completion of the assignment.

ZO 890 Doctoral Preliminary Examination 1-9.

For student who are preparing for and taking written and/or oral preliminary exams.

ZO 893 Doctoral Supervised Research 1-9.

Instruction in research and research under the mentorship of a member of the Graduate Faculty.

ZO 895 Doctoral Dissertation Research 1-9.

Dissertation research.

ZO 896 Summer Dissertation Research 1.

For graduate students whose programs of work specify no formal course work during a summer session and who will be devoting full time to thesis research.

ZO 899 Doctoral Dissertation Preparation 1-9.

For students who have completed all credit hour, full-time enrollment, preliminary examination, and residency requirements for the doctoral degree, and are writing and defending their dissertations.