Physiology

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The Physiology Graduate Program is an interdisciplinary and interdepartmental program comprising faculty drawn from across the University. An advanced degree in Physiology is highly valued by the scientific community and can lead to careers in research and teaching in academia, industry and government laboratories, public policy and consulting. Research is carried out using a variety of model organisms, laboratory and companion and agriculturally important species.

Admission Requirements

Students entering the graduate program in Physiology should have a Bachelor's degree in a related biological or physical science. Undergraduate courses should include Physiology, Biochemistry, Organic Chemistry, Calculus, and Physics. Each application package will be screened by the Admissions Committee. Factors considered for admission include: grade point average (3.0 is required for regular admission), GRE scores, undergraduate courses, letters of recommendation, and the willingness of a member of the Graduate Physiology faculty to serve as the applicant's advisor. 

Master's Degree Requirements

All Master's students are required to complete PHY 503, PHY 504, BCH 553, and a one-credit hour course in research ethics.  Master of Science Degree:  For a Master of Science degree a minimum of 30 semester hours of graduate work in the degree program is required including a minimum of 20 hours of course work at the 500-800 level. On average, the M.S. degree takes two to three years to complete. Master of Physiology Degree: The non-thesis Master's degree (Master of Physiology) requires a total of 36 credits. The median time to degree completion is 1.75 years or less.

Student Financial Support

Financial assistance for qualified students in the form of research assistantships, fellowships and traineeships is available through participating departments only and not through the Physiology program for thesis-based students only.

Other Relevant Information

Graduate students enrolled as Physiology majors are housed in the department of their major professor and may participate in departmental activities.

Recommended Courses Normally Included in Programs of Study for the M.S Degree and the Non-Thesis MOP Program

Other recommended/supporting courses are available through many departments, e.g. Animal Science, Biochemistry, Biomathematics, Biotechnology, Cell Biology, Comparative Biomedical Sciences, Entomology, Genetics, Immunology, Microbiology, Nutrition, Pharmacology, Poultry Science, Psychology, Statistics, and Toxicology, and may be included for consideration in the plan of work.

Faculty

Full Professors

  • Glen William Almond
  • Kenneth E. Anderson
  • Christopher M. Ashwell
  • Betty L. Black
  • Anthony T. Blikslager
  • Russell J. Borski
  • Patricia Ann Curtis
  • David C. Dorman
  • Frank W. Edens
  • Kenneth L. Esbenshade
  • Charlotte E. Farin
  • William Lucas Flowers IV
  • John E. Gadsby
  • Troy Ghashghaei
  • Jody L. Gookin
  • Sung Woo Kim
  • Matthew D. Koci
  • Hsiao-Ching Liu
  • Christian Maltecca
  • Kathryn Montgome Meurs
  • Paul Edward Mozdziak
  • Jack Odle
  • Heather Patisaul
  • James N. Petitte
  • Robert M. Petters
  • Shannon Elizabeth Phillips
  • Richard M. Roe
  • Paul David Siciliano
  • Geoffrey W. Smith
  • Jeffrey A. Yoder

Associate Professors

  • Luke B. Borst
  • Babetta Ann Breuhaus
  • Jose Manuel Bruno-Barcena
  • John Edward Meitzen
  • Marianne Niedzlek-Feaver
  • Marcelo Rodriguez-Puebla

Practice/Research/Teaching Professors

  • Elaine B. Bohorquez
  • Hanna Gracz
  • Jeong Dae Lee
  • Jane L. Lubischer
  • Shweta Trivedi

Emeritus Faculty

  • Talmage T. Brown Jr.
  • Warren J. Croom Jr.
  • Robert M. Grossfeld
  • Harold F. Heatwole
  • Thomas E. Levere
  • John F. Roberts
  • Malcolm C. Roberts
  • Thomas David Siopes
  • Herbert A. Underwood
  • Steven Paul Washburn
  • Michael David Whitacre
  • Thomas G. Wolcott

Courses

PHY 503  General Physiology I  (3 credit hours)  

Physiology is the study of the how living systems function from the molecular to organismal level. As such, this course will build on your knowledge of anatomy, biochemistry, and cell biology and also presumes a working knowledge of the basics of college level physics and chemistry. Students will learn the fundamental mechanisms underlying normal function of cells, tissues, organs, and organ systems of the human body and be able to integrate knowledge and concepts from various organ systems to explain function in the human body. In this course, we will address cellular, neural, muscular, and gastrointestinal physiology in humans.

P: BCH451 and BCH553 (or equivalents) and one year each of college-level physics and chemistry

Typically offered in Fall only

PHY 504  General Physiology II  (3 credit hours)  

Physiology is the study of the how living systems function from the molecular to organismal level. As such, this course will build on your knowledge of anatomy, biochemistry, and cell biology and also presumes a working knowledge of the basics of college level physics and chemistry. Students will learn the fundamental mechanisms underlying normal function of cells, tissues, organs, and organ systems of the human body and be able to integrate knowledge and concepts from various organ systems to explain function in the human body. In this course, we will address cardiovascular, respiratory, and renal physiology in humans.

P: BCH451 and BCH553 (or equivalents) and one year each of college-level physics and chemistry

Typically offered in Spring only

PHY 505  Pathophysiology  (2 credit hours)  

Pathophysiology is one of the bridge courses between basic medical science and clinical medicine: it plays an important role in basic medical courses, concerning the etiology and pathogenesis of disease as well as the mechanisms of functional and metabolic alterations in disease. Different from pathology, which emphasizes the morphological changes, pathophysiology focuses on the functional and metabolic alterations and mechanisms underlying the development of diseases. This discussion- and presentation-based course will focus on developing written and oral communication skills through the use of case studies.

R: Physiology Program Students Only

Typically offered in Spring only

PHY 524/PO 524/ZO 524  Comparative Endocrinology  (3 credit hours)  

Basic concepts of endocrinology, including functions of major endocrine glands involved in processes of growth, metabolism and reproduction.

Prerequisite: BIO 421 or PO 405

Typically offered in Spring only

PHY 552/PHY 452/ANS 452/ANS 552  Comparative Reproductive Physiology and Biotechnology  (3 credit hours)  

Comparative approach to examining aspects of reproductive physiology in selected vertebrate species. Detailed examination of current reproductive biotechnologies and ethical issues associated with the application of reproductive biotechnologies. Credit will not be given for both ANS 452 and ANS (PHY) 552.

Prerequisite: ANS 220

Typically offered in Fall only

PHY 595  Special Topics in Physiology  (1-6 credit hours)  

The study of special problems and selected topics of current interest in physiology and related fields.

Typically offered in Spring only

PHY 601  Physiology Seminar  (1 credit hours)  

Weekly seminars on topics of current interest given by resident faculty members, graduate students and visiting lecturers.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing

Typically offered in Spring only

PHY 610  Special Topics In Physiology  (1-6 credit hours)  

The study of special problems and selected topics of current interest in physiology and related fields.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

PHY 620  Special Problems In Physiology  (1-6 credit hours)  

Credits Arranged

Prerequisite: Graduate standing

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

PHY 685  Master's Supervised Teaching  (1-3 credit hours)  

Teaching experience under the mentorship of faculty who assist the student in planning for the teaching assignment, observe and provide feedback to the student during the teaching assignment, and evaluate the student upon completion of the assignment.

Prerequisite: Master's student

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

PHY 690  Master's Examination  (1-9 credit hours)  

For students in non thesis master's programs who have completed all other requirements of the degree except preparing for and taking the final master's exam.

Prerequisite: Master's student

Typically offered in Summer only

PHY 693  Master's Supervised Research  (1-9 credit hours)  

Instruction in research and research under the mentorship of a member of the Graduate Faculty.

Prerequisite: Master's student

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

PHY 695  Master's Thesis Research  (1-9 credit hours)  

Thesis Research

Prerequisite: Master's student

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

PHY 696  Summer Thesis Research  (1 credit hours)  

For graduate students whose programs of work specify no formal course work during a summer session and who will be devoting full time to thesis research.

Prerequisite: Master's student

Typically offered in Summer only

PHY 699  Master's Thesis Preparation  (1-9 credit hours)  

For students who have completed all credit hour requirements and full-time enrollment for the master's degree and are writing and defending their thesis.

Prerequisite: Master's student

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

PHY 702/ANS 702  Reproductive Physiology of Mammals  (3 credit hours)  

Survey of reproductive strategies among vertebrates; in-depth coverage of mammalian reproductive physiology; gametogenesis, fertilization, embryonic and fetal development, parturition, puberty, neuroendrocrine control mechanisms in male and female mammals.

Prerequisite: ZO 421

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

PHY 764/CBS 764/NTR 764  Advances in Gastrointestinal Pathophysiology  (3 credit hours)  

This course will focus on advanced gastrointestinal physiology and the pathophysiology of deseases of relevance to scientsts involved in animal-related research. In particular, the course will cover the pathophysiology of ulceration, infectious diarrhea, ischemia, motility disorders, and inflammatory diseases of the gut. An in-depth review paper will be required based on recent literature rgarding a specific gastrointestinal disease.

Prerequisite: PHY 503, PHY 504

Typically offered in Fall only

PHY 780/ANS 780  Mammalian Endocrinology  (3 credit hours)  

Mammalian endocrine system with emphasis on ontogeny and anatomy of key organs; synthesis and action of hormones. Role of hormones in regulation of physiological processes such as metabolism, exocrine function, digestion, ion balance, behavior, lactation, growth and reproduction.

Prerequisite: BCH 451, ZO 421

PHY 795  Special Topics in Physiology  (1-9 credit hours)  

The study of special problems and selected topics of current interest in physiology and related fields.

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

PHY 801  Physiology Seminar  (1 credit hours)  

Weekly seminars on topics of current interest given by resident faculty members, graduate students and visiting lecturers.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing

Typically offered in Spring only

PHY 810  Speical Topics In Physiology  (1-4 credit hours)  

The study of special problems and selected topics of current interest in physiology and related fields.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

PHY 820  Special Problems In Physiology  (1-6 credit hours)  

Credits Arranged

Prerequisite: Graduate standing

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

PHY 885  Doctoral Supervised Teaching  (1-3 credit hours)  

Teaching experience under the mentorship of faculty who assist the student in planing for the teaching assignment, observe and provide feedback to the student during the teaching assignment, and evaluate the student upon completion of the assignment.

Prerequisite: Doctoral student

Typically offered in Summer only

PHY 890  Doctoral Preliminary Examination  (1-9 credit hours)  

For students who are preparing for and taking written and/or oral preliminary exams.

Prerequisite: Doctoral student

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

PHY 893  Doctoral Supervised Research  (1-9 credit hours)  

Instruction in research and research under the mentorship of a member of the Graduate Faculty.

Prerequisite: Doctoral student

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

PHY 895  Doctoral Dissertation Research  (1-9 credit hours)  

Dissertation Research

Prerequisite: Doctoral student

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

PHY 896  Summer Dissertation Research  (1 credit hours)  

For graduate students whose programs of work specify no formal course work during a summer session and who will be devoting full time to thesis research.

Prerequisite: Doctoral student

Typically offered in Summer only

PHY 899  Doctoral Dissertation Preparation  (1-9 credit hours)  

For students who have completed all credit hour requirements, full-time enrollment, preliminary examination, and residency requirements for the doctoral degree, and are writing and defending their dissertations.

Prerequisite: Doctoral student

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer