Engineering Management

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The Master of Engineering Management degree deepens your critical analytical, science and engineering talents — Think. It also broadens your crucial management skills — Lead. NC State’s Master of Engineering Management degree provides you the skills necessary to manage and succeed in today’s complex technical environments.

The Master of Engineering Management degree consists of 10 courses (30 credit hours). Five (5) courses are located in the core curriculum, with the remaining five (5) courses in the student's chosen concentration. Concentrations are as follows:
All concentrations include a masters project / practicum course. 

Faculty

Full Professors

  • Julie Ivy

Practice/Research/Teaching Professors

  • Brandon M. McConnell

Courses

Business

BUS 554  Project Management  (3 credit hours)  

Life cycle view of organizing and managing technical projects, including project selection, planning, and execution. Methods for managing and controlling project costs, schedules, and scope. Techniques for assessing project risk. Use of popular project management software tools. Application of project management tools and methods to product development, software, and process reengineering projects.

Typically offered in Spring and Summer

BUS 590  Special Topics In Business Management  (1-6 credit hours)  

Presentation of material not normally available in regular courses offerings or offering of new courses on a trial basis.

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

bUSINESS aDMINISTRATION

MBA 536  Experience Innovation and Strategic Design  (3 credit hours)  

Successful innovation involves creating more valuable experiences for users and customers. The course covers key concepts and methodologies for experience-based innovation, drawing on design and creativity frameworks to fully understand customer experiences. Course activities include exercises and a project to practice innovation and "design-thinking" tools and techniques in a business context. Relevant strategic perspectives for designing innovative products and services are addressed through case studies and other managerial readings with practical business application. The importance of a multi-disciplinary approach to experience innovation is emphasized, such that the course is suitable for students in all disciplines with an interest in innovation.

Typically offered in Spring only

MBA 541  Supply Management  (3 credit hours)  

Major themes and strategies of supply management relationships. The focus is on establishing a basis for collaborative relationships with suppliers through focused market intelligence research, relationship assessment and management, negotiation, collaborative contracting, and on-going management of relationships in global supply chains. Emphasis on the importance of collaboration through the application of practical tools and approaches that drive mutually beneficial outcomes. Core processes around initial exploration and assessment of supply chain relationships, establishing metrics/expectations for the relationship, crafting and managing contracts, and sustaining continuous performance improvement in sourcing, logistics and operations. Every student will participate in a team-based supply chain project with an organization and will learn the team-based, deadline-driven nature of supply chain initiatives in a real-company setting.

Co-requisite: MBA 540 Operations and Supply Chain Management

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

MBA 543  Planning and Control Systems  (3 credit hours)  

Design and management of planning and control systems within the organization and across the supply chain. Business planning, master production scheduling, material requirements planning, just-in-time and theory of constraints. Enterprise resourceplanning (ERP) and business-to-business (B2B) systems. Impact of information technologies on planning and control systems. Major project using state-of-the-art ERP system.

Typically offered in Spring only

MBA 545  Decision Making under Uncertainty  (3 credit hours)  

Structured framework for modeling and analyzing business decisions in the presence of uncertainty and complex interactions among decision parameters. Topics include decision models, value of information and control, risk attitude, spreadsheet applications, and decision analysis cycle. Interactive case study.

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

MBA 549  Supply Chain Management Practicum  (3 credit hours)  

Research project examining supply chain management issues at an organization, usually a member of the Supply Chain Resource Cooperative. Projects will typically focus on procurement, logistics, materials management, operations, or integrated supply chain issues.

Prerequisite: MBA 540

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

MBA 570  Opportunity Evaluation and Value Creation  (3 credit hours)  

First course in a two-course entrepreneurship sequence focusing on opportunities outside the technology arena. Management of the innovative activities of a firm (new and/or existing) to facilitate entrepreneurship-the discovery, evaluation, and exploitation of opportunities to create value. Generation and screening of new product/process ideas or concepts. Transformation of such ideas into products, processes, or services that satisfies stakeholders (e.g., customers, employees). Topics include self-assessment of personal aspirations, skills, and competencies, as well as opportunity identification/evaluation, business model design, and launching and scaling ventures.

Credit not allowed in MBA 570 if the student has already taken MBA 576 or MBA 577.

Typically offered in Fall only

MBA 571  High Growth Entrepreneurship  (3 credit hours)  

Second course in a two-course entrepreneurship sequence focusing on opportunities outside the technology arena. Theoretical and practical, team-based, approach to the evaluation and assessment of opportunities for value creation. Emphasis on how to discover, validate, and then execute on an action plan to create value. Credit not allowed if the student has already taken MBA 576 or MBA 577.

Prerequisite: MBA 570. Credit not allowed if the student has already taken MBA 576 or MBA 577.

Typically offered in Spring only

MBA 572  Venture Opportunity Analytics  (3 credit hours)  

Application of the process-based model for new business startups to multiple clients. Emphasis is placed on data gathering, data analysis and data interpretation in the context of evaluating opportunities for new business. Students work in teams on a variety of projects with technology commercialization clients such as Wolfpack Investment Network and Office of Technology Commercialization and New Ventures.

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

MBA 590  Special Topics In Business Management  (1-6 credit hours)  

Presentation of material not normally available in regular courses offerings or offering of new courses on a trial basis.

civil eNGINEERING

CE 561  Construction Project Management  (3 credit hours)  

Construction project management and control using network based tools, time-money analysis and other quantitative and qualitative techniques. Planning and scheduling, critical path, lead-lag, resource allocation, uncertainty, cash flow and payment scheduling, change orders, project acceleration, coordination and communication, record keeping. Emphasis on computer-based techniques.

Prerequisite: CE 463

CE 564/CE 464  Legal Aspects of Contracting  (3 credit hours)  

Legal aspects of contract documents, drawings and specifications; owner-engineer-constructor relationships and responsibilities; bids and contract performance, Labor laws; governmental administrative and regulatory agencies; torts; business organizations; ethics and professionalism.

Prerequisite: CE 463; Corequisite: CE 365

Typically offered in Spring only

CE 565  Construction Safety Management  (3 credit hours)  

Fundamentals of safety management principles. Detailed review of OSHA regulations and standards critical to construction engineers and managers who expect to design and administer safety related systems in a construction project. Analysis and design of example minimum safety requirements for application in construction field operations. Review of OSHA Standards for the Construction Industry, a review of selected sections of OSHA Standards for General Industry, a review of general principles of construction safety management.

Prerequisite: CE 465 or CE 466

Typically offered in Spring only

CE 567  Risk and Financial Management in Construction  (3 credit hours)  

Fundamental concepts in financial and risk analysis in construction; accounting and financial metrics in construction; risk assessment and risk management in construction including the cost of risk, decision making strategies, the role of sureties, effects of risk in project delivery methods and contract types; risk effects in project financing including a review of financing sources, considerations for financing local and international projects; and the impact of financial and risk management in strategic planning in construction.

Prerequisite: ACC 220, CE 463

Typically offered in Spring only

CE 578/CE 478  Energy and Climate  (3 credit hours)  

Interdisciplinary analysis of energy technology, natural resources, and the impact on anthropogenic climate change. Topics include basic climate science, energetics of natural and human systems, energy in fossil-fueled civilization, the impact of greenhouse gas emissions on climate, and technology and public policy options for addressing the climate challenge. The course is quantitative with a strong emphasis on engineering and science.

Prerequisite: Senior standing

Typically offered in Fall only

CE 590  Special Topics In Civil Engineering  (1-6 credit hours)  

New or special course on recent developments in some phase of civil engineering. Specific topics and prerequisites identified for each section and varied from term to term.

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

CE 675  Civil Engineering Projects  (1-6 credit hours)  

Research- or design-oriented independent study and investigation of a specific civil engineering topic, culminating in final written report.

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

CE 775  Modeling and Analysis Of Environmental Systems  (3 credit hours)  

Movement and fate of pollutant discharges. Development and application of analytical solutions and numerical models. Role of these models in planning and management. Mathematical programming models. Alternative management strategies: direct regulation, charges and transferable discharge permits. Multiple objectives: cost, equity and certainty of outcome.

Prerequisite: CE 339 and CE 282

Typically offered in Fall only

cOMMUNICATIONS

COM 527  Seminar in Organizational Conflict Management  (3 credit hours)  

Examination of conflict antecedents, interventions, outcomes through multiple texts, journal articles. Emphasis on workplace conflict, organizational outcomes, dispute system design. Evaluation through participation in class discussion, independent papers, research project, presentation.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing

Typically offered in Summer only

COM 530  Interpersonal Communication in Science and Technology Organizations  (3 credit hours)  

Blends theory and research to understand and analyze interpersonal communication practices and issues within organizations, including managing impressions and conversations, engaging in active listening, managing conflict, influencing others, and communicating in teams. Focus on developing and maintaining effective interpersonal at work and improving student's communication competence.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing

Typically offered in Summer only

COM 556  Seminar In Organizational Communication  (3 credit hours)  

Theoretic and applied approaches for studying communication perspectives of organizational behavior. Topics relate communication with organizational theories, research methods, leadership, power, attraction, conflict and theory development.

Prerequisite: Advanced Undergraduate standing or Graduate standing

Typically offered in Spring only

Engineering

EGR 501  Engineering Leadership and Strategic Change  (3 credit hours)  

In the current business environment, an understanding of leadership and change management is essential to career success. The objective of this course is to provide practitioners in technical fields the knowledge to lead, align and transform the human element, individuals and teams, to achieve organizational performance excellence. The class includes both individual and collaborative (team) learning. An engineering, technical, or scientific undergraduate degree is required.

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

EGR 505  Managerial Finance for Engineers  (3 credit hours)  

In the current business environment, familiarity with and appreciation of finance is essential to career success. Technically competent managers must be able to speak the common language of business and to understand how their work affects the performance of their organization. The objective of this course is to provide practitioners in technical fields the financial know-how to plan, control and make decisions that achieve organizational performance excellence. The class includes both individual and collaborative (team) learning. An engineering, technical or scientific undergraduate degree is required.

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

EGR 506  Managing New Hi Tech Product Launches  (3 credit hours)  

This course covers new high-tech product development and launch from the perspective of the technical manager responsible for developing and launching new products and new lines of business within the high tech firm. Topics cover the entire spectrum of the new products development and launch process starting from concept generation and ideation and concept evaluation all the way through market testing and product launch. Each phase of the new products management process will be covered and illustrated by case studies. Students will generate a new product development and launch plan as a course project..3 credit hours.

Requirement: Graduate standing in Engineering

Typically offered in Spring and Summer

EGR 507  Product Life Cycle Management  (3 credit hours)  

This course covers the management of complex technical products during all phases of the product life cycle. It is a broad survey of all the tools needed by the technical product manager throughout the life cycle of a complex product. The course is taught with a systems approach and from the engineering manager's viewpoint. The product life cycle includes all aspects of managing products from launch through maturity.

Requirement: Graduate standing in Engineering

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

EGR 590  Special Topics in Engineering  (1-6 credit hours)  

Discussion of special topics in engineering. Identification of various specific topics and prerequisites for each section from term to term.

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

Engineering Management

EM 675  Engineering Management Masters Project  (3-6 credit hours)  

Individual or team project work with faculty mentorship in engineering management resulting in written report and oral presentation. This is one of the approved courses to fulfill engineering management practicum requirements. Maximum of three (3) credits to be earned for MEM degree with the exception of Professional Practice concentration students who may earn six (6) credits. Practical experience in applying EM knowledge to real-world problems at either an industrial site or at NC State.

Restriction: Reserved for students enrolled in the Masters of Engineering Management

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

Industrial and Systems Engineering / Operations Research

ISE 501/OR 501  Introduction to Operations Research  (3 credit hours)  

Operations Research (OR) is a discipline that involves the development and application of advanced analytical methods to aid complex decisions. This course will provide students with the skills to be able to apply a variety of analytical methods to a diverse set of applications. Methods considered include linear and mixed-integer programming, nonlinear and combinatorial optimization, network models, and machine learning. Focus will be on how to translate real-world problems into appropriate models and then how to apply computational procedures and data so that the models can be used as aids in making decisions. Applications will include improving the operation of a variety of different production and service systems, including healthcare delivery and transportation systems, and also how OR can be used to make better decisions in areas like sports, marketing, and project management. Prerequisites include undergraduate courses in single variable differential and integral calculus and an introductory course in probability.

Prerequisites include undergraduate courses in single variable differential and integral calculus (similar to MA 421) and an introductory course in probability (similar to ST 421 or ST 371 and ST 372)

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

ISE 510  Applied Engineering Economy  (3 credit hours)  

Engineering economy analysis of alternative projects including tax and inflation aspects, sensitivity analysis, risk assessment, decision criteria. Emphasis on applications.

Prerequisite: Undergrad. courses in engineering economics and ST

Typically offered in Spring only

ISE 511/ISE 411  Supply Chain Economics and Decision Making  (3 credit hours)  

This course introduces students to the principles of microeconomic analysis applied to decision-making in supply chains. Emphasis will be put on strategic interactions between different decision makers in the supply chain, including suppliers, manufacturers, retailers, and consumers. Topics include classical demand and production theory, pricing and revenue management, competition between firms, and cooperation between and within firms under information asymmetry.

Prerequisite: ISE 135

Typically offered in Fall only

ISE 519  Database Applications in Industrial and Systems Engineering  (3 credit hours)  

Rapid application development (RAD) tools to design and implement database-based applications. This includes: SQL query language, Visual Basic for Applications in database application construction, a standard RAD environment and how to access information in a database, entity/attribute modeling of the database structure, anomalies of database structures that create problems for applications, modeling of application system's functionality, and integrating these tools together to design and implement engineering applications. Examples from manufacturing and production systems. Restricted to advanced undergraduates and graduate students.

Prerequisite: ISE 110

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

ISE 520  Healthcare Systems Performance Improvement I  (3 credit hours)  

Methods used to improve the performance of health care delivery systems with emphasis on patient care cost, access, and quality. Adaptation of lean and six-sigma to rapid and continuous health care systems improvement through organizational and process transformation. Fundamentals of scheduling, staffing, and productivity in health systems employing simulation and optimization. Health care policy and management.

Prerequisite: ST 372, ISE 352, ISE 361, and ISE 441

Typically offered in Fall only

ISE 521  Healthcare Systems Performance Improvement II  (3 credit hours)  

Continuation of ISE 520 with a concentration on the completion of a healthcare systems process improvement project at the sponsoring health care institution. Project must employ the tools and techniques of healthcare systems process improvement. The project is done in conjunction with a diverse and multi-disciplinary team from the healthcare institution. The student must serve as a facilitator and coach, resulting in a project with measured success. Success will be determined by the improvement in patient care as quantified in cost, quality, and access.

Prerequisite: ISE 520

Typically offered in Spring only

ISE 525/ISE 425/OR 425/OR 525  Medical Decision Making  (3 credit hours)  

This will focus on the use of optimization in Medicine. The main goal of this course is for you to develop an understanding of the recent methodological literature on optimization methods applied to medical decision making. We will cover a broad range of topics, both from the methodological perspective (study models using integer programming, dynamic programming, simulation, etc.) and from the public policy/public health perspective (who are the stake holders, what are the relevant questions modelers can answer, how is the patient taken into account, etc.).

P: ISE/OR 505 or equivalent and ISE 560 or equivalent or permission by instructor

Typically offered in Spring only

ISE 533/OR 433/OR 533/ISE 433  Service Systems Engineering  (3 credit hours)  

This course intends to provide a comprehensive treatment on the use of quantitative modeling for decision making and best practices in the service industries. The goal of this class is to teach students to able to identify, understand, and analyze services; and acquire the quantitative skills necessary to model key decisions and performance metrics associated with services. Students will be exposed both to classical and contemporary examples of challenges and opportunities that arise when working in the service sector.

Prerequisite: ISE 361

Typically offered in Spring only

ISE 535/ISE 435  Python Programming for Industrial & Systems Engineers  (3 credit hours)  

The objective of this course is to build on your knowledge of computing and data analysis by focusing on programming using the Python language. IN particular, you will learn more about the Python and its ecosystem of libraries, how to use data structures in Python programs, conduct File I/O operations, and perform numerical and scientific computing within Python. This course is designed for senior undergraduate and graduate students to get the basics of the Python language and learn to use it to perform scientific computing within Python with two of its most popular packages in use for heavy data intensive analysis - Numpy and SciPy. Several engineering examples from physics, industrial engineering core courses and general engineering will be used to contextualize the programming examples.

Prerequisites: ST 370 OR ST 371 and ISE 135 OR CSC 111 OR CSC 113 OR CSC 116 or ST 307 OR ST 308 OR ECE 209. Restrictive Statement: Department Approval Required

Typically offered in Fall only

ISE 541  Occupational Safety Engrg  (3 credit hours)  

Occupational accident-injury study; morbidity, mortality; investigation and analysis. Hazard control; energy countermeasure strategies; control technology. Impact biomechanics, trauma and survivability. Risk assessment; systems safety analysis. Product design, manufacturing defects, system failures and human error as causative factors. Safety program development. Near-accident reporting. OSHA compliance; standards. Accident, trauma and forensic case studies from manufacturing, motor carrier andconstruction industries.

Typically offered in Spring only

ISE 544  Occupational Biomechanics  (3 credit hours)  

Anatomical, physiological, and biomechanical bases of physical ergonomics. Strength of biomaterials, human motor capabilities, body mechanics, kinematics and anthropometry. Use of bioinstrumentation, active and passive industrial surveillance techniques and the NIOSH lifting guide. Acute injury and cumulative trauma disorders. Static and dynamic biomechanical modeling. Emphasis on low back, shoulder and hand/wrist biomechanics.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing

Typically offered in Fall only

ISE 547/ISE 447  Applications of Data Science in Healthcare  (3 credit hours)  

Health professional are capable of collecting massive amounts of data and look for best strategies to use this information. Healthcare analytics have the potential to reduce costs of treatment, predict outbreaks of epidemics, avoid preventable diseases and improve the quality of life in general. This course will explore some of the frequently used data science methods in healthcare and examine a compilation of the most recent academic journal articles on the subject. Students are expected to have a strong background in optimization and stochastic modeling.

Prerequisite: ISE 362

Typically offered in Fall only

ISE 552  Design and Control of Production and Service Systems  (3 credit hours)  

Basic terminology and techniques for the control of production and service systems including economic order quantity models; stochastic inventory models; material requirements planning; Theory of Constraints; single and mixed model assembly lines ; and lean manufacturing. Emphasis on mathematical models of the interaction between limited capacity and stochastic variability through the use of queueing models to describe system behavior.

Prerequisite: ST 371 or ST 372

Typically offered in Fall only

ISE 553  Modeling and Analysis of Supply Chains  (3 credit hours)  

Basic issues in operating supply chains, using state of the art modeling tools available for their analysis. Emphasis on using engineering models to develop insights into the behavior of these systems.

Prerequisite: ISE 361 and ST 372

Typically offered in Spring only

ISE 560/OR 560  Stochastic Models in Industrial Engineering  (3 credit hours)  

ISE/OR 560 will introduce mathematical modeling, analysis, and solution procedures applicable to uncertain (stochastic) production and service systems. Methodologies covered include probability theory and stochastic processes including discrete and continuous Markov processes. Applications relate to design and analysis of problems, capacity planning, inventory control, waiting lines, and service systems.

Typically offered in Fall only

ISE 562/TE 562/OR 562  Simulation Modeling  (3 credit hours)  

This course concentrates on design, construction, and use of discrete/continuous simulation object-based models employing the SIMIO software, with application to manufacturing, service, and healthcare. The focus is on methods for modeling and analyzing complex problems using simulation objects. Analysis includes data-based modeling, process design, input modeling, output analysis, and the use of 3D animation with other graphical displays. Object-oriented modeling is used to extend models and enhance re-usability.

Typically offered in Spring only

ISE 677  Industrial Engineering Projects  (1-6 credit hours)  

Investigation and written report on assigned problems germane to industrial engineering. Maximum of six credits to be earned for MIE degree.

Prerequisite: MIE candidates

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

ISE 754  Logistics Engineering  (3 credit hours)  

Elements of logistics networks. Supply chain design: facility location and allocation; great-circle distances; geocoding. Multi-echelon production and inventory systems; sourcing decision systems. Vehicle routing: exact, approximation, and heuristic procedures; traveling salesman problem; basic vehicle routing problem and extensions; backhauling; mixed-mode transportation system design.

Prerequisite: ISE 453

Typically offered in Spring only

Statistics

ST 513  Statistics for Management I  (3 credit hours)  

Analysis of data to represent facts, guide decisions and test opinions in managing systems and processes. Graphical and numerical data analysis for descriptive and predictive decisions. Scatter plot smoothing and regression analysis. Basic statistical inference. Integrated use of computer.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

ST 515  Experimental Statistics for Engineers I  (3 credit hours)  

General statistical concepts and techniques useful to research workers in engineering, textiles, wood technology, etc. Probability distributions, measurement of precision, simple and multiple regression, tests of significance, analysis of variance,enumeration data and experimental design.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

ST 516  Experimental Statistics For Engineers II  (3 credit hours)  

General statistical concepts and techniques useful to research workers in engineering, textiles, wood technology, etc. Probability distributions, measurement of precision, simple and multiple regression, tests of significance, analysis of variance, enumeration data and experimental designs.

Prerequisite: ST 515

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

ST 517  Applied Statistical Methods I  (3 credit hours)  

Course covers basic methods for summarizing and describing data, accounting for variability in data, and techniques for inference. Topics include basic exploratory data analysis, probability distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, and regression analysis. This is a calculus-based course. Statistical software is used; however, there is no lab associated with the course. Credit not given for this course and ST 511 or ST 513 or ST 515. This course does NOT count as an elective towards a degree or a minor in Statistics. Note: the course will be offered in person (Fall) and online (Fall and Summer).

Prerequisites: MA 241 or equivalent (Calculus II) and MA 405 or equivalent (Linear Algebra)

Typically offered in Fall and Summer

ST 518  Applied Statistical Methods II  (3 credit hours)  

This second course in statistics for graduate students is intended to further expand students' background in the statistical methods that will assist them in the analysis of data. Course covers many fundamental analysis methods currently used to analyze a wide array of data, mostly arising from designed experiments. Topics include multiple regression models, factorial effects models, general linear models, mixed effect models, logistic regression analysis, and basic repeated measures analysis. This is a calculus-based course. Statistical software is used, however, there is no lab associated with the course. Credit not given for this course and ST 512 or ST 514 or ST 516. Note: this course will be offered in person (Spring) and online (Fall and Spring).

Prerequisite: ST 517

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

Integrated Manufacturing Systems

IMS 675  Manufacturing Systems Engineering Project  (1-6 credit hours)  

Individual or team project work in integrated manufacturing systems engineering resulting in an engineering report. Required of all degree candidates in IMSE master's program. Forms the basis for IMSE student's final oral examination.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in IMSE

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

tEXTILE eNGINEERING

TE 533/TT 533/TTM 533  Lean Six Sigma Quality  (3 credit hours)  

Systematic approach (Lean Six Sigma philosophy) for improving products and processes. Defining the improvement opportunity, measurement system analysis, data collection, statistical analysis, design of experiment (DOE) methods, and statistical process control (SPC) methods. Application of Lean Six sigma methods to improve product or process.

Prerequisite: ST 361 and ST 371, or equivalent

Typically offered in Spring only