History

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Admission Requirements

Admission to the M.A. in History and Public History programs require: a bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university; transcripts; personal statement, listing career goals, historical interests, and potential advisor; letters of recommendation; and a writing sample of approximately ten pages. Admission to the Ph.D. in Public History  requires a bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university; transcripts; personal statement, listing career goals, historical interests, and potential advisor; letters of recommendation; and a writing sample of approximately ten pages.

Master's Degree Requirements

Master of Arts Degree in History: This program requires a total of 30 credit hours, including 6 hours in core courses, 12 credit hours in a major field, 6 credit hours in a minor field, and 6 credit hours in thesis work. Each student's program is tailored to enhance his or her career objectives. Social studies teachers, for example, may earn advanced competency on completion of the M.A. in history with additional course work in education. Similarly, students who plan to pursue a Ph.D. degree receive the requisite training and assistance. Master of Arts Degree in Public History: This program requires 36 credit hours of course work. Students may take a non-thesis or thesis option. Half the hours fall in historical studies, the rest in applied history classes, including innovative courses in museum studies and heritage studies. Students perform internships in their own special areas of interest.

Doctoral Degree Requirements

The Ph.D. program in Public History requires 72 credit hours. Students complete 21 credit hours in a public history field, including an internship; 21 credit hours in a history field; 6 credit hours in an outside field; and 24 credit hours of dissertation work.

Student Financial Support

Graduate teaching assistantships are available to students in all programs and are awarded by open competition.

Other Relevant Information

The application deadline for fall semester is January 15; students are admitted for the fall semester only.

Faculty

Full Professors

  • William Adler
  • David R. Ambaras
  • Ross Knox Bassett
  • Craig T. Friend
  • David P. Gilmartin
  • Holly Hurlburt
  • Akram F. Khater
  • Mi Gyung Kim
  • Keith Phillip Luria
  • Anne W. Mitchell
  • Samuel Thomas Parker III
  • Julia Rudolph
  • Kenneth Steven Vincent
  • David Aaron Zonderman

Associate Professors

  • Matthew Morse Booker
  • M. L. Cherry
  • Blair Lynne Murphy Kelley
  • William Charles Kimler
  • Susanna M. Lee
  • Julie L. Mell
  • Katherine Mellen Charron
  • Brent S. Sirota
  • Noah B. Strote

Assistant Professors

  • Kristen Alff
  • Xiaolin Duan
  • Ebony Jones
  • Tate Paulette

Emeritus Faculty

  • James E. Crisp
  • Owen J. Kalinga
  • John M. Riddle
  • Richard Wayne Slatta
  • Stephanie Laine Spencer
  • Gerald Surh

Lecturer

  • Gwyneth Anne Thayer

Courses

HI 500/HI 400  Civilization of the Ancient Near East  (3 credit hours)  

The civilization of Mesopotamia and Egypt from earliest times to the fall of Babylon in 539 B.C. Credit for both HI 400 and HI 500 is not allowed

Prerequisite: 3 hours of History

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 502/REL 502  Early Christianity to the Time of Eusebius  (3 credit hours)  

Growth and diffusion of early Christianity from the end of the first century up to the time of Eusebius and the conversion of Constantine (early fourth century); Christianity in its Greco-Roman environment; Roman policy towards Christianity; heterodox Christian movements; anti-heretical writings; orthodox institutions of authority. Students may not receive credit for both REL /HI 402 and REL/HI 502.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 503/HI 403  Ancient Greek Civilization  (3 credit hours)  

The history of the Hellenes from the Minoan civilization through Alexander's legacy, with readings in Herodotus and Thucydides. Credit will not be given for both HI 403 and HI 503.

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 504/HI 404  Rome to 337 A.D.  (3 credit hours)  

The development of ancient Rome from its origins in Italy, through the rise as an Empire embracing the entire Mediterranean World and Western Europe, to Constantine, Christianity and the foundation of Constantinople. Examines critically the political achievement of a people who rose from an obscure Italian city to a world empire, with emphasis on the analysis of primary sources. Credit will not be given for both HI 404 and HI 504

P: 3 hrs. of History

HI 505/HI 405  History and Archaeology of the Roman Empire  (3 credit hours)  

Analysis of Rome's rule over the Mediterranean World in the first four centuries A.D. through the use of literary and archaelologic sources. Special emphasis on imperial army and frontier security. Credit will not be given for both H1 405 and H1 505

P: 3 hrs. of History

HI 506/HI 406  From Roman Empire to Middle Ages  (3 credit hours)  

Late Antiquity and the early Middle Ages. The transition from classical civilization to the basis of modern civilizations; the fall of Rome, the Germanic kingdoms, Byzantium, the establishment of Christianity, the birth and growth of Islam. Credit will not be given for both HI 406 and HI 506

P: 3 hrs. of History

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 507/REL 507  Islamic History to 1798  (3 credit hours)  

The history of the Islamic Near East to 1798. Topics include the East Mediterranean before Islam, Muhammad and the development of Islam, sources of Muslim civilization, Islamic law, science, philosophy, art and architecture, Islam in Spain, India, Asia and Africa, the Crusades, the Ottomans, Islam and Europe. Credit will not be given for both REL/HI 407 and REL/HI 507.

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 508/REL 508  Islam in the Modern World  (3 credit hours)  

Evolution of modern Islam from 17th century to the present. Primary emphasis on North Africa, the Middle East and South Asia. Pre-modern Islamicate empires, reform and revival. Historical origins of current issues in the Islamic world. Students cannot receive credit for both REL/HI 408 and REL/HI 508.

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 509/HI 409  The High Middle Ages  (3 credit hours)  

Medieval culture from 10th through 13th centuries: revival of the Roman Empire, monastic and papal reform, rise of universities, evolution of representative bodies, the Gothic style, troubadour and goliardic poetry, scholasticism, and revival of Roman law. Credit will not be given for both HI 409 and HI 509

P: 3 hrs. of History

HI 511/HI 411  Trials of Faith: Religious Reformation in Early-Modern Europe  (3 credit hours)  

Examination of the great disruption in European civilization associated with the Protestant and Catholic Reformations. The course considers the new religious ideas and practices associated with the Reformations and transformation they produced in European political and economic life; the violence they provoked; the new thinking about families and gender roles they encouraged, the spread of European religions around the globe with European voyages of discovery and conquest, and the beginning of ideas about religious toleration. Credit will not be given for both HI 411 and HI 511.

P: 3 hrs. of History

GEP Global Knowledge

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 512/HI 412  The Sexes and Society in Early-Modern Europe  (3 credit hours)  

Examination of changes in gender relations; ideas about the sexes, femininity, and masculinity; the roles of women and men in political, religious, economic, scientific, and family life in Europe between the late Middle Ages and the French Revolution. Credit for HI 412 and HI 512 is not allowed.

P: 3 hrs. of History

GEP Global Knowledge

HI 514/HI 414  From Kings to Revolution: The History of Early-Modern France  (3 credit hours)  

Examination of the most politically powerful and culturally dominant kingdom in early-modern Europe, which dissolved into a revolution that destroyed its monarchy while establishing ideas about democracy and equality. From the glories of the Versailles palace to the misery of peasant villages, topics include the beginnings of the French state and nation in the warfare and religious conflicts of 1500s, political and economic developments, the growth of an internationally influential French culture, religious change, controversies over gender roles, and the origins of the French Revolution. Credit will not be given for both HI 414 and HI 514.

P: 3 hrs. of History

GEP Global Knowledge

HI 515/HI 415  The French Revolution  (3 credit hours)  

Broadly based analysis of France's first revolutionary era; the enlightenment and its impact, the causes and character of the Revolution in France; impact of these events in France and Europe. Credit will not be given for both HI 415 and HI 515

P: 3 hrs. of History

GEP Global Knowledge

HI 518/HI 418  Fascist Italy and Nazi Germany  (3 credit hours)  

Fascism as a theoretical concept, rise of fascism in Italy and Germany, seizure of power by Mussolini and Hitler, organization of the economy, churches, military, women, youth, and culture under the dictatorships. Students will not receive credit for both HI 418 and HI 518

P: 3 hrs. of History

GEP Global Knowledge

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 519/HI 419  Modern European Imperialism  (3 credit hours)  

Historical background of European overseas expansion; its impact on the economics, politics and culture of both Europe and the colonized world; the significance of imperialism and anti-colonial nationalism in shaping the modern world. Credit will not be given for both HI 419 and HI 519

P: 3 hrs. of History

GEP Global Knowledge

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 521/HI 421  European Intellectual History: The Eighteenth Century  (3 credit hours)  

Historical examination of some of the major figures of the European Enlightenment, beginning with Locke and ending with Kant. Credit will not be given for both HI 421 and HI 521

P: 3 hrs. of History

GEP Global Knowledge

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 522/HI 422  European Intellectual History: The 19th Century  (3 credit hours)  

Historical examination of some of the major figures of European thought during the 19th century, beginning with the enthusiasm of the period of the French Revolution and ending with the disillusionment of the fin de siecle. Credit will not be given for both HI 422 and HI 522

P: 3 hrs. of History

GEP Global Knowledge

HI 523/HI 423  Women in European Enlightenment  (3 credit hours)  

Historical analysis of feminist thought and action during the Enlightenment of the 1700s. Topics include women's role in the development of Western knowledge and science, historical construction of the gendered "nature" of women, education and political resources available to women, and their strategies for emancipation. Credit will not be given for both HI 423 and HI 523.

P: 3 hrs. of History

GEP Global Knowledge

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 525/HI 425  Tudor and Stuart England  (3 credit hours)  

British history from the Reformation through the Civil War. Emphasis on key developments in social, political and economic life: The development of a new concept of kingship, the growing independence of Parliament, the search for religious uniformity and the changing status of the aristocracy and gentry. Credit will not be given for both HI 425 and HI 525

P: 3 hrs. of History

GEP Global Knowledge

HI 530/HI 430  Modern France  (3 credit hours)  

French history from the downfall of Napoleon I to the present, with a short introductory survey of the Old Regime and the French Revolution. Cultural, social and economic developments and political trends. Credit will not be given for both HI 430 and HI 530

P: 3 hrs. of History

GEP Global Knowledge

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 533  Theory and Practice of Oral History  (3 credit hours)  

Explores the practice of oral history. Examines historical works drawn primarily from oral sources. Teaches students to design and implement oral history projects based on independent research.

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 534/HI 434  Theory and Practice of Digital History  (3 credit hours)  

Introduces students to the theory and practice of digital history. Students will examine theoretical scholarship on digital practices in history, learning how to acquire, edit, process, analyze, and present humanistic data. Students will critique examples of digital history including digital archives, exhibits, scholarship, and teaching resources, and then apply conceptual knowledge in the creation of their own digital history projects. The course is geared to students without prior knowledge of coding. Credit will not be given for both HI 434 and HI 534.

R: Graduate Standing or PBS

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 535  Spatial History  (3 credit hours)  

Introduces students to the methods, problems, and questions of spatial history. Students will examine major works in spatial history and historical geography, and develop their own projects utilizing the tools of historical GIS. Students will engage in theoretical discussions about the role of space in history and, at the same time, will acquire the skills for collecting, managing, and analyzing historical spatial data. The course is geared to students without prior knowledge of GIS. Graduate standing or PBS status.

R: Graduate Standing or PBS

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 539  History Of the Soviet Union and After  (3 credit hours)  

History of the Soviet state and society from the 1917 Revolution, including post-Soviet situation. Political disarray and resistance to the Bolshevik regime, 1917-21; industrialization, urbanization and application of coercive techniques of rule; popular reconciliation with Party state and great power status during World War II and after; fate of non-Russian nationalities; de-Stalinization, stagnation and failed attempt at Party renewal after 1985. Credit for both HI 439 and HI 539 is not allowed

HI 540/HI 440  American Environmental History  (3 credit hours)  

Interactions between humans and their environments in America; environmental focus on themes in American history such as colonial settlement, industrialization, progressivism, the New Deal, the 1960s. Credit will not be given for both HI 440 and HI 540.

Prerequisite: 3 hours of History

GEP Interdisciplinary Perspectives

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 541/HI 441  Colonial and Revolutionary U.S  (3 credit hours)  

Origins of the English colonies in America to the American Revolution. European background to colonization, merging of different cultures, effects of mercantile doctrine, causes of revolution. Credit will not be given for both HI 441 and HI 541

P: 3 Hours of History

HI 543/HI 443  U.S. Constitutional History to 1883  (3 credit hours)  

This course examines the origins and development of the U. S. Constitution from the Articles of Confederation to 1883. The course specifically looks at the federal Convention of 1787, the national bank debate and early constitutional interpretation;the constitution and its interaction with politics, economics, and society; the powers of Congress-taxation, contracts, commerce and war. The course also examines sovereignty, slavery and civil rights. It ends with an analysis of the Civil War Amendments and the transformation in American constitutionalism. Credit for both HI 443 and HI 543 is not allowed

P: 3 hrs. of History

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 544  US Constitutional History Since 1870  (3 credit hours)  

Examines the transformation of American constitutional thought after the Civil War; the triumph of nationalism and the evolution of a new federal theory; the rise and fall of federal protections of civil rights. Explores key concepts such as civil liberties, judicial activism and judicial restraint; analyzes procedural and substantive due process, liberty of contracts and entrepreneurial liberty; evaluates Japanese internment, privacy, gender equality, free speech, religious freedom, civil liberties. credit not given for both HI 444 and 544

Prerequisite: Graduate standing

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 545/HI 445  Early American Borderlands  (3 credit hours)  

Examines the social, political, and cultural development of the eastern American frontiers between the early seventeenth and mid-nineteenth centuries. Addresses the relationships between settlers and environments, settlers and Native Americans. Explores the structure and life of pioneer families, the development of new institutions, the role of governments in regulating settlements, and the evolution of the "frontier myth." Credit cannot be given for both HI 445 and HI 545.

P: 3 hrs. of History

GEP Humanities, GEP U.S. Diversity

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 546/HI 446  Topics in Civil War and Reconstruction  (3 credit hours)  

Examination of the historiography of the American Civil War and Reconstruction. Topics include the origins of the war, military strategy, the northern and southern homefront, nationalism and citizenship, slavery and freed labor, changing gender roles and ideologies, struggles over racial inequality, and conservatism and radicalism during Reconstruction. Credit will not be given for both HI 446 and HI 546.

Prerequisite: 3 hrs. of History

GEP Humanities, GEP U.S. Diversity

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 547/WGS 547/HI 447/WGS 447  Women in America: From Contact to the Civil War  (3 credit hours)  

The historical experience of women in America from Native American and European contact through the colonial period to the immediate post-Civil-War years (to 1890). Topics include the history of women's work, education, legal and political status, religious experience, and sex roles, with consideration of age, class, race, sexual preference, and region as significant variables in women's experience in America. Credit will not be given for both HI (WGS) 447 and HI (WGS) 547.

P: 3 Hours of History

GEP Humanities, GEP U.S. Diversity

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 548/WGS 548/HI 448/WGS 448  American Women in the Twentieth Century  (3 credit hours)  

Women's historical experience in America, 1890-1990. Changes in women's work, education, legal and political status, and sex roles, age, class, race, sexual preference and region as significant variables in women's experience. Credit will not be given for both HI (WGS) 448 and HI (WGS) 548.

P: 3 hrs. of History

GEP Humanities, GEP U.S. Diversity

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 549/HI 449  U.S. Labor to 1900  (3 credit hours)  

This course explores the history of work, workers, and working-class life and labor in the United States from the founding of the first European colonies to the beginning of the twentieth century: bound and free labor in colonial America, the transformation of urban worklife in the decades preceding the Civil War, slavery and class formation in the antebellum South, the effects of immigration on American workers, and the impact of race and gender on workers' solidarity. Credit will not be given for both HI 449 and HI 549.

P: 3 hrs. of History

GEP U.S. Diversity

HI 550  U. S. Labor Since 1900  (3 credit hours)  

This course explores the history of work, workers, and working class organizations in the twentieth century United States; with particular attention to three core issues in twentieth-century American labor history: whether the US South has a particular form of labor history; the historical struggle for workers¿ rights to collectively act and protest; and the intersections between race, ethnicity, immigration and labor in the twentieth-century US. Credit for both HI 450 and HI 550 is not allowed.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing

HI 551/HI 451  The Vietnam War  (3 credit hours)  

The Vietnam War in Vietnamese historical context. A study of major works on the legacy of French colonialism; the growth of Vietnamese radicalism and communism; World War II and the Vietnamese Revolution; the French Indochina War and political division; nation building in north and south Vietnam; conflict between north and south; American intervention; and the memory of war in Vietnam. Credit for both HI 451 and HI 551 is not allowed.

Prerequisite: 3 hours of History

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 552/HI 452  Recent America  (3 credit hours)  

Examination of contemporary opinions and historical interpretations of major problems in American life since 1939, including World War II, its social and economic consequences; Korea and the Cold War, big business and labor; civil rights and feminist movements; countercultures, Vietnam and Watergate. Credit will not be given both for HI 452 and HI 552

P: 3 Hours of History

HI 553/HI 453  United States-Latin American Relations Since 1823  (3 credit hours)  

Critical analysis of the last two centuries of relations between the US and Latin America. Exploration of major policies using primary sources and declassified CIA documents. Major themes include US economic, political, and military influence, covert and overt US interventions, and response by Latin American governments. Historical perspectives on contemporary inter-American problems such as drugs, environment, debt crisis, human rights abuses, and the impact of the Latino population in the U.S. Credit will not be given both for HI 453 and HI 553.

Prerequisite: 3 hrs. of History

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 554  History Of U. S. Foreign Relations, 1900-Present  (3 credit hours)  

American diplomatic history since 1900; the expansion of American economic and cultural relations; the evolution of the American foreign policy bureaucracy; and the historical forces and personalities that shaped American relations with other nations. Credit for both HI 454 and HI 554 is not allowed

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 555/AFS 555/HI 455/AFS 455  History of the Civil Rights Movement  (3 credit hours)  

The black revolution; stages and leaders of the movement; successes and failures in the fight for desegregation, the vote, and economic opportunity; impact of Civil Rights movement on the United States. Credit will not be given both for AFS/HI 455 and AFS/HI 555.

P: 3 hrs. of History

GEP Humanities, GEP U.S. Diversity

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 559/HI 459  The Early American Republic  (3 credit hours)  

Examines the social, political, and cultural development of the Early Republic, the period in American history roughly from the Revolutionary War through the Administration of John Quincy Adams. Employs the life of Thomas Jefferson-the quintessential American, as the foundation for delving into the historical problems, interpreting primary sources, and analyzing secondary sources. Encourages graduate students to analyze the ways in which historiographic debates complicate our understanding of the Early American Republic. Credit will not be given for both HI 459 and HI 559.

Prerequisite: 3 hrs. of History

HI 561/HI 461  Civilization of the Old South  (3 credit hours)  

The distinctive features of the Old South as part of the regional development of United States history. Consideration of colonial factors in the making of the South, development of the plantation system and slavery, Southern social order, intellectual and cultural life, economic development, and rise of Southern nationalism. Credit will not be given for both HI 461 and HI 561

Prerequisite: 3 hrs. of History

HI 562/HI 462  Southern History since the Civil War  (3 credit hours)  

Exploration of many American "Souths" from Reconstruction to the present. How race/ethnicity, gender, class, geography, sexuality, and culture inform "Southern" identity; major political and economic changes; and the region's relationship to the nation and the world. Credit will not be given for HI 462 and HI 562.

Prerequisite: 3 hours of History

GEP Humanities, GEP U.S. Diversity

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

HI 563/HI 463  Topics in History and Memory  (3 credit hours)  

Explores how "collective memory" develops. Examines how memory is represented through public speeches, civic celebrations, monuments and memorials, and other forms of popular and political culture. Analyzes what is recalled, what is forgotten, and who decides. Asks why memory is made public. May be repeated once for credit when offered with a different topic. Credit will not be given for both HI 463 and HI 563.

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

HI 566  Readings in Native American History  (3 credit hours)  

Readings in the varied historical experiences of nations native to North America from the first migrations of peoples into the continent until the present, including the variety and diversity of native cultures and experiences; native resistance to colonialism, expansion, and U.S. federal policies; and the survival and continuity of native cultures and peoples through more than four centuries of contact, conquest, and change.

HI 568/HI 468  Slavery in the Americas  (3 credit hours)  

Exploration of the development of chattel slavery throughout the Americas. Analysis of the emergence and development of New World slavery in ways that encourage students to think critically about the historical processes of abolition, emancipation, and freedom across the Atlantic world. The lectures and readings seek to dislodge the notion that the "history of slavery" only pertains to the United States. The course, instead, emphasizes commonalities and differences in ways that challenge assumptions that the institution was exceptional in any given region. Credit will not be given for both HI 468 and HI 568.

Prerequisite: 3 Hours of History

GEP Global Knowledge

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 569/HI 469  Latin American Revolutions  (3 credit hours)  

Comparative analysis of causes, participants, process, and outcome of revolutions in Mexico, Bolivia, Cuba, and Central America. Credit for both HI 469 and HI 569 will not be given

Prerequisite: 3 Hours of History

GEP Global Knowledge

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 570/HI 470  Exploring World History  (3 credit hours)  

Introduction to the methods, themes, and narratives of world history. As a distinct approach to historical study, world history focuses on dynamic connections and relationships among regions of the world and the variety of global processes - related to trade, religion, production, consumption, migration, imperialism, disease, and technologies - that connected them. The course is a suggested elective for future teachers who will teach world history in high school, as well as an ideal course for History majors and graduate students who want to explore the connections among all the regionally specific upper division courses they have taken. Credit will not be given for both HI 470 and HI 570.

Prerequisite: 3 hours of History

GEP Global Knowledge

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 571/HI 471  Revolutionary China  (3 credit hours)  

China 1900 to present. Examination of political, cultural, and socio-economic revolutionary phases of China's 20th-century transformation from traditional empire to communism. Particular attention to post-1949 problems of nation-building. Credit will not be given for both HI 471 and HI 571

P: 3 hrs. of History

GEP Global Knowledge

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 572  The Rise of Modern Japan, 1850-Present  (3 credit hours)  

Japan's emergence as a modern nation and world power. Topics include nation-state formation; modernization and its dislocations; democratization and authoritarianism; imperialism, international politics, and war; postwar reforms; changing gender relations; popular culture; and social problems. Credit will not be given for both HI 472 and HI 572

Prerequisite: Graduate standing

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 573/HI 473  Japan's Empire in Asia, 1868-1945  (3 credit hours)  

An advanced survey of Japanese relations with Asia in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Structures and ideologies of imperialism and colonialism; modernization, nationalism and social change; migration and mobility; resistance and collaboration; and legacies of empire. Credit will not be given for both HI 473 and HI 573

P: 3 hrs. of History

GEP Global Knowledge

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 575/AFS 575/HI 475/AFS 475  History of the Republic of South Africa  (3 credit hours)  

Evolution of the Republic of South Africa's society, with emphasis on the interaction of diverse peoples and cultures. Particular attention is given to the period since 1870. Credit will not be given for both HI (AFS) 475 and HI 575.

Prerequisite: 3 hours of History

GEP Global Knowledge

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

HI 576/AFS 576/HI 476/AFS 476  Leadership in Modern Africa  (3 credit hours)  

Recent sub-Saharan African political history (excluding South Africa). Overview of concepts, vocabulary, historical trends. Detailed examination of specific African countries as case studies, such as Ghana, Nigeria, Zimbabwe, Tanzania. Credit will not be given for both HI (AFS) 476 and HI 576.

Prerequisite: 3 hours of history

GEP Global Knowledge

HI 578  Islam and Christianity in Sub-Saharan Africa since the 19th Century  (3 credit hours)  

Expansion and interaction of Islam and Christianity in sub-Saharan Africa in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and their influence and impact on the economy, politics, and society. Topics include missionary activity, resistance to imperial authority, the role of the churches, and the influence of religion on leadership, education, nationalism, and post-colonialism. Credit will not be given for both HI 478 and HI 578; graduate standing for HI 578.

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 579/AFS 579/HI 479/AFS 479  Africa (sub-Saharan) in the Twentieth Century  (3 credit hours)  

Developments in sub-Saharan Africa during the colonial period, from the end of the nineteenth century to the advent of decolonization in the early 1960s. Interplay of political, social, economic and cultural factors in the experiences of African peoples during this period. Credit will not be given for both HI (AFS) 479 and HI 579

Prerequisite: 3 hours of History

GEP Global Knowledge

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 581/HI 481  History of the Life Sciences  (3 credit hours)  

Historical context of the individuals, ideas, scientific practices, and social goals that created the core concepts of the modern biological sciences, from Renaissance medicine to molecular biology, with a focus on interconnections of the scientific knowledge and perspective of the life sciences with other aspects of culture, including other sciences, views about nature and life, religious belief, medical practice, and agriculture. Topics include the development of biological experiments; theories of ecology and evolution; the chemical understanding of health, food, and drugs; and the modern molecular revolution. Credit will not be given for both HI 481 and HI 581.

P: 3 hrs. of History

GEP Interdisciplinary Perspectives

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 582/HI 482  Darwinism in Science and Society  (3 credit hours)  

Scientific development of Darwinism and its reception by the scientific community and the general public. Social impact of theories of evolution as reflected in Social Darwinism, eugenics, sociobiology, and relationship of sciences to ethics and religion. Credit will not be given both for HI 482 and HI 582

P: 3 hrs. of History

GEP Interdisciplinary Perspectives

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 583/HI 483  Science and Religion in European History  (3 credit hours)  

Are science and religion inherently in conflict with each other? Historical analysis of the idea of the ¿warfare between religion and science,¿ treating their complex relationship and respective cultural authority before 1800, including the relationship of science and religion in Europe during periods of the Reformation, the creation of early modern states, and the Enlightenment of the 1700s. Topics include visions of nature and utopias, the creation of mechanistic science in the 1600s, and natural theology. Credit will not be given for both HI 483 and HI 583.

P: 3 hrs. of History

GEP Global Knowledge, GEP Interdisciplinary Perspectives

HI 584/HI 484  Science in European Culture  (3 credit hours)  

The role of science in shaping early modern European identity, culture and polity in the 1600s and 1700s. Drawing on documents and material culture, topics include the meaning of natural wonders, explorations, travel literature, instruments and mapping, colonies and empire, and universal expos. Credit will not be given for both HI 484 and HI 584.

P: 3 hrs. of History

GEP Global Knowledge, GEP Interdisciplinary Perspectives

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 585/HI 485  History of American Technology  (3 credit hours)  

Technology in American history: the ideological, social, economic, and institutional contexts of technological change from the 1760's to the present. Impacts of new technological systems. Credit will not be given for both HI 485 and HI 585.

Prerequisite: 3 hours of History

GEP Interdisciplinary Perspectives

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

HI 586/HI 486  Science and Empire  (3 credit hours)  

The development of European science in the context of world exploration, global commercial expansion, local knowledge, and visions of colonization and empire. Credit will not be given for both HI 486 and HI 586.

Prerequisite: 3 hours of History

GEP Global Knowledge, GEP Humanities

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 587/ANT 587  Cultural Resource Management  (3 credit hours)  

Theoretical and practical overview of U.S. federal and state laws, institutions, and practices related to the inventory, evaluation, preservation, protection, and overall management of cultural resources; history and philosophical bases of Cultural Resource Management (CRM); professional ethics; indigenous and other stakeholder interests in CRM; and comparative national regulations outside the U.S. and the international heritage management and organizations. Graduate standing in history required.

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 588/HI 488  Family and Community History  (3 credit hours)  

Theory and research in family history, local history, and community studies, as well as application to public history presentation and community development. Students cannot receive credit for both HI 488 and HI 588.

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 589  Interpretation in Historic Sites and Parks  (3 credit hours)  

Methodologies of interpreting history at historic sites and parks; training in interpretive tools linking historiography and research methodology with real places for presentation to the public; considerations of practical application. Five day trips required. Graduate standing or NDS.

Requisite: NCSU Graduate Students (MR or DR), NDS Students Only

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 591  Museum Studies  (3 credit hours)  

Organization and operation of museums as historical agencies. Role of museums in historical research and education. Graduate standing or NDS.

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 593  Material Culture  (3 credit hours)  

Current theories of material culture analysis and their application to history museums. Graduate standing or NDS.

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 594  Cultural Heritage  (3 credit hours)  

Use of the past and its cultures in reinforcing identities. Global development of heritage preservation, cultural resource management, and heritage tourism. Role of heritage professionals in identification, study, assessment, preservation, interpretation, management, and promotion of historic and cultural resources. Law and regulations that protect and preserve cultural resources. Graduate standing or NDS.

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 595  Special Topics in History  (1-6 credit hours)  

Topical courses or experimental course offerings in advanced historical study.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

HI 596  Introduction To Public History  (3 credit hours)  

Historical origins of public history, applications of history to public life, historiography and major paradigms in the field, and debates about the public role of historians. Graduate standing in History.

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 597  Historiography and Historical Method  (3 credit hours)  

Major steps in development of historical investigation; analysis of elements of historical research; discussion of methodology and archival materials used by contemporary scholarly historian.

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 598  Historical Writing  (3 credit hours)  

Critical studies in the methods and practice of contemporary historical writing.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or PBS status

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 599  Independent Study  (1-3 credit hours)  

Individualized study conducted under supervision of graduate faculty. Course of study, assigned readings, course projects or papers, and methods of evaluating work to be detailed in writing and approved by department head.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or PBS status

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

HI 642  Internship In Public History  (3 credit hours)  

Supervised internship experience with a public or private historical agency or institution or local, regional, or national significance. Graduate standing in History.

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

HI 685  Master's Supervised Teaching  (1-3 credit hours)  

Teaching experience under the mentorship of faculty who assist the student in planning for the teaching assignment, observe and provide feedback to the student during the teaching assignment, and evaluate the student upon completion of the assignment.

Prerequisite: Master's student

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 693  Master's Supervised Research  (1-9 credit hours)  

Instruction in research and research under the mentorship of a member of the Graduate Faculty.

Prerequisite: Master's student

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

HI 695  Master's Thesis Research  (1-9 credit hours)  

Thesis Research

Prerequisite: Master's student

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

HI 696  Summer Thesis Research  (1 credit hours)  

For graduate students whose programs of work specify no formal course work during a summer session and who will be devoting full time to thesis research.

Prerequisite: Master's student

Typically offered in Summer only

HI 699  Master's Thesis Preparation  (1-9 credit hours)  

For students who have completed all credit hour requirements and full-time enrollment for the master's degree and are writing and defending their thesis. Credits Arranged

Prerequisite: Master's student

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

HI 787  African American Public History  (3 credit hours)  

Issues in public history practice as they relate to the collection, preservation, and interpretation of African American cultural history. Graduate standing in history required.

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 788  Native American Public History  (3 credit hours)  

Issues in public history practice as they relate to the collection, preservation, and interpretation of Native American history. Graduate standing in history required.

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 789  Public History in International Context  (3 credit hours)  

Global public history since 1945, including functions of historical memory as they relate to global economics of public history, world heritage, and the transnational contexts for the work of historians.

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 791  Colloquium in Public History  (3 credit hours)  

Advanced historiographical readings on major topics in public history. Graduate standing only.

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 792  Colloquium in History  (3 credit hours)  

Advanced historiographical readings on major topics in history. May be repeated for credit with different topic. Graduate standing in History only.

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

HI 795  Special Topics  (1-6 credit hours)  
HI 799  Independent Study  (1-3 credit hours)  

Independent Study

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

HI 885  Doctoral Supervised Teaching  (1-3 credit hours)  
HI 889  Doctoral Dissertation Seminar  (1 credit hours)  

Development of a solid dissertation structure, research strategy and drafting of framing chapters, preparation of dissertation proposal and proposal presentation, strategies for revision of dissertation. Three consecutive semesters beginning in semester of exams. Graduate standing in history only.

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

HI 895  Doctoral Dissertation Research  (1-9 credit hours)  
HI 896  Summer Dissert Res  (1 credit hours)  
HI 899  Doctoral Dissertation Preparation  (1-3 credit hours)