Nutrition

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The Interdepartmental Nutrition Program consists of faculty from multiple departments, including: Animal Science; Agricultural and Human Sciences; Food, Bioprocessing, and Nutrition Sciences; Horticultural Science; Molecular and Structural Biochemistry; and the Prestage Department of Poultry Science. Students reside and conduct research in one of these departments under the direction of an appropriate advisor. Research in the nutrition program may be conducted with a variety of species and at various levels, such as molecular, cell, whole animal, and human communities. Research programs are primarily in the area of nutritional biochemistry, experimental animal nutrition (e.g. horses, ruminants, swine, poultry, rodents, and other species), or community nutrition and public health. Graduates find employment in academia, government, industry, and non-profit organizations, or continue their education in medical and allied health fields.

Admission Requirement

To be considered for admission, a student should have a B.S. or M.S degree, preferably in a science-related area. Additionally, applicants must have course work in biology and organic chemistry to be considered for admission. Students for M.S. or Ph.D. should contact and be recommended by a prospective major faculty advisor in their area of interest prior to final admission. Applicants to the Master of Nutrition should indicate their preferences for: on-campus or Distance Education delivery; an emphasis in animal, poultry, or food science (human) nutrition; core science or Professional Science Masters (PSM); and within the PSM, Feed Science or Human Nutrition.

Master's Degree Requirements

A minimum of 30 course credit hours, including a thesis is required for M.S., 36 for Master of Nutrition. The Master of Nutrition has options for all course delivery by Distance Education, with emphases in Feed Science or Human Nutrition, and an option for course work that qualifies as a Professional Science Master's degree.

Doctoral Degree Requirements

A minimum of 72 credit hours, including a dissertation for Ph.D. Students must complete core courses, including: Energy Metabolism, Protein and Amino Acid Metabolism, Vitamin Metabolism, and Mineral Metabolism.

Student Financial Support

Assistantships and fellowships may be available for M.S. and Ph.D. students on a competitive basis from the departments in which the advisor resides. Admission does not guarantee availability of financial support.

Faculty

Full Professors

  • Jonathan C. Allen
    Area of Research: Food, Bioprocessing and Nutrition Science
  • Kenneth E Anderson
    Area of Research: Prestige Poultry Science
  • Patricia C. Dunn
    Area of Research: Agriculture and Human Sciences
  • Joan Eisemann
    Area of Research: Animal Science
  • Vivek Fellner
    Area of Research: Animal Science
  • Peter R. Ferket
    Area of Research: Prestige Poultry Science
  • Mario Ferruzzi
    Area of Research: Food, Bioprocessing and Nutrition Science
  • Jesse Lee Grimes
    Area of Research: Prestige Poultry Science
  • Sung Woo Kim
    Area of Research: Animal Science
  • Mary Ann Lila
    Area of Research: Food, Bioprocessing and Nutrition Science
  • Christian Maltecca
    Area of Research: Animal Science
  • Jeannette A. Moore
    Area of Research: Animal Science
  • Paul Edward Mozdziak
    Area of Research: Prestige Poultry Science
  • Jack Odle
    Area of Research: Animal Science
  • Edgar Orlando Oviedo-Rondon
    Area of Research: Prestige Poultry Science
  • Shannon Elizabeth Phillips
    Area of Research: Animal Science
  • Matt H. Poore
    Area of Research: Animal Science
  • Muquarrab Quresh
    Area of Research: Food, Bioprocessing and Nutrition Science - USDA
  • Paul David Siciliano
    Area of Research: Animal Science
  • Eric VanHeugten
    Area of Research: Animal Science

Associate Professors

  • Dara Bloom
    Area of Research: Agriculture and Human Sciences
  • April Fogleman
    Area of Research: Food, Bioprocessing and Nutrition Science
  • Suzie Goodell
    Area of Research: Food, Bioprocessing and Nutrition Science
  • Gabriel Keith Harris
    Area of Research: Food, Bioprocessing and Nutrition Science
  • Lindsey Haynes-Maslow
    Area of Research: Agriculture and Human Sciences
  • Collin Kay
    Area of Research: Food, Bioprocessing and Nutrition Science
  • Slavko Komarnytsky
    Area of Research: Food, Bioprocessing and Nutrition Science
  • Andrew Neilson
    Area of Research: Food, Bioprocessing and Nutrition Science
  • Giuseppe Valachhi
    Area of Research: Animal Science

Assistant Professors

  • Kimberly Ange-VanHeugten
    Area of Research: Animal Science
  • Natalie Cooke
    Area of Research: Food, Bioprocessing and Nutrition Science
  • Kerim Eroglu
    Area of Research: Molecular and Structural Biochemistry
  • Massimo Iorizzo
    Area of Research: Horticultural Science
  • Michael V. Joseph
    Area of Research: Animal Science
  • Arion Kennedy
    Area of Research: Molecular and Structural Biochemistry
  • Arion Kennedy Midgett
    Area of Research: Molecular and Structural Biochemistry
  • Carrie Pickworth
    Area of Research: Animal Science
  • Ondulla Toomer
    Area of Research: Food, Bioprocessing and Nutrition Science - USDA
  • Nicola Singletary
    Area of Research: Food, Bioprocessing and Nutrition Science

Emeritus Faculty

  • Brenda P Alston-Mills
  • Sarah Liberman Ash
  • Leonard W. Aurand
  • Leon Carl Boyd
  • Leonard S Bull
  • Edward V. Caruolo
  • George L. Catignani
  • Warren J Croom Jr
  • Jimmy Dale Garlich
  • Winston Murry Hagler
  • Raymond W. Harvey
  • William L Johnson
  • James R. Jones
  • James Arthur Knopp
  • Carolyn Jean Lackey
  • Jean-Marie Luginbuhl
  • Jacquelyn W. McClelland
  • Steven J. Schwartz
  • Jason C. Shih
  • Harold E. Swaisgood
  • Van-Den Truong
  • Lon Weidner Whitlow

Adjunct professors

  • Katherine Patterson Maloney
  • Muquarrab Ahmed Qureshi

Courses

NTR 500  Principles of Human Nutrition  (3 credit hours)  

Overview of fields of Nutritional Sciences; functions of nutrients in the human body; sources and properties of nutrients; relationships of food industry practices to nutrition. Credit will not be given for both NTR (FS)400 and NTR 500

Prerequisite: CH 220 and (CH 221 or CH 223) and (ZO 160 or BIO 181/183)

Typically offered in Summer only

NTR 501/FS 501/NTR 401/FS 401  Advanced Nutrition and Metabolism  (3 credit hours)  

Nutritional biochemistry and physiology as it relates to establishment of nutrient requirements and Dietary Reference Intakes. Digestion, absorption, metabolism, storage, and excretion of nutrients and other markers of nutritional adequacy or excess with emphasis on micronutrients. Functions of nutrients, in bone muscle, blood, growth and development and communication. Credit will not be awarded for both NTR (FS) 401 and NTR (FS) 501.

Prerequisite: (NTR 301 or NTR 415) and (CH 221 or CH 220 or CH 225)

Typically offered in Fall and Summer

NTR 510/NTR 410  Maternal and Infant Nutrition  (3 credit hours)  

Students will explore the current research, controversies, and biological mechanisms related to nutrition for women before, during, and after pregnancy, as well as for infants in utero and after birth.

Prerequisite: NTR 301

Typically offered in Spring and Summer

NTR 511/NTR 411  Public Health Perspectives in Infant Feeding  (3 credit hours)  

This course is designed to help prepare learners to become International Board Certified Lactation Consultants (IBCLC). In this course, students will learn the basics and importance of infant and young child feeding from a public health perspective. Some of the topics that are covered in this course include the public health considerations of breastfeeding and formula feeding in the US and globally, breastfeeding initiation and infant behavior, lifestyle practices and infant feeding, family challenges related to infant feeding, infant feeding research and global impacts, cultural humility for health care providers, and collaboration among healthcare professionals.

Typically offered in Fall and Summer

NTR 512/NTR 412  Clinical Concepts in Infant Feeding  (3 credit hours)  

This course is designed to help prepare learners to become International Board Certified Lactation Consultants (IBCLC). Students will learn skills and content required for entry level clinical support for infant feeding. Students will learn the fundamentals of infant positioning, latch, and suckle, assessment skills required to evaluate physical development of both the mother and the infant, milk synthesis, milk production, and milk transfer. This course will also prepare the learner to manage the feeding needs of infants across the age spectrum, from the premature infant to the toddler and older child. We will discuss complicated scenarios, to include breastfeeding with physical anomalies, infant hyperbilirubinemia, hypoglycemia, slow weight gain, failure to thrive, and many others. Students will be required to provide their own transportation for field trips.

Typically offered in Spring and Summer

NTR 513/NTR 413  Clinical Concepts in Infant Feeding Laboratory  (1 credit hours)  

The laboratory course is designed to complement course content to help prepare learners to become International Board Certified Lactation Consultants (IBCLC). Students will learn and practice skills required for entry-level clinical support for infant feeding. Students will learn the fundamentals of infant positioning, latch, and suckle, and assessment skills required to evaluate physical development of both the mother and the infant, milk synthesis, milk production, and milk transfer. This course will also prepare the learner to manage the feeding needs of infants across the age spectrum, from the premature infant to the toddler and older child. Students will be expected to provide their own transportation for off-campus experiences.

Typically offered in Spring only

NTR 515/ANS 515/ANS 415/NTR 415/PO 415/PO 515  Comparative Nutrition  (3 credit hours)  

Principles of nutrition, including the classification of nutrients and the nutrient requirements of and metabolism by different species for health, growth, maintenance and productive functions.

Prerequisite: ANS 225 or ANS 230 or CH 220 or CH 223 or CH 227

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

NTR 521/NTR 421  Life Cycle Nutrition  (3 credit hours)  

This course focuses on the physiologic changes and nutritional needs throughout the life cycle. Additionally, students will explore psychosocial and environmental influencers on food consumption and diet quality at each stage of life. Pregnancy and lactation, fetal development, infancy, early childhood, childhood, adolescence, young and middle adulthood, and geriatrics will be examined. Student will apply course content to real-world settings through individual and/or group service-learning projects. Credit will not be given for both NTR 421 and NTR 521.

Prerequisite: NTR 301 and junior standing required

Typically offered in Spring only

NTR 525/FM 525/ANS 525/PO 525/NTR 425/ANS 425/FM 425/PO 425  Feed Manufacturing Technology  (3 credit hours)  

Feed mill management, feed ingredient purchasing, inventory, storage, and quality evaluation, computerized feed formulation, feeding programs for poultry and swine, feed mill design, equipment, maintenance, operation, safety, state and federal regulations pertaining to feed manufacture.

Prerequisite: ANS(NTR,PO) 415 or ANS 230 or ANS 225

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

NTR 540/NTR 440  Child & Adolescent Nutrition  (3 credit hours)  

In this course, students will gain an in-depth understanding of human nutritional needs during early and middle childhood and adolescence. Students will consider how child development affects nutrition and eating behaviors, explore common nutrition concerns that emerge throughout childhood, and evaluate interventions and policies to improve child and adolescent nutrition. The course also includes an introduction to special topics such as food allergies, disordered eating, child obesity, and vegetarian diets. Assessments are designed to evaluate students' mastery of content knowledge, critical thinking, and communication skills. The course content will be delivered in a variety of ways, including lectures, readings, videos, in-class activities, and guest lectures.

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

NTR 550/ANS 550  Applied Ruminant Nutrition  (3 credit hours)  

Applied concepts in ruminant nutrition for the practicing agricultural professional. Protein, energy, vitamin and mineral nutrition in relation to the nutritional needs and practical feeding of beef cattle, dairy cattle, sheep, and goats. New developments in feeding systems, feed additives and the prevention and treatment of metabolic disorders. Emphasis on solving problems in case studies. Permission given to undergraduates

Prerequisite: ANS 230 or ANS(NTR,PO) 415. Permission given to undergraduates

Typically offered in Fall only

NTR 554/FS 554  Lactation, Milk, and Nutrition  (3 credit hours)  

Nutritional properties of milk as a high-quality food with nutritional diversity. Principles of physiology, biochemistry and cell biology in the mammary gland. Procedures of milk production and milk collection for milk quality and nutrition. Human lactation vs. that of domestic animals. Impacts of biotechnology and food safety on dairy production. Credit will not be given for both ANS 454 and 554.

Prerequisite: ANS 230 or FS/NTR 400; BCH 451 or ZO 421

Typically offered in Spring only

NTR 555/FS 555  Exercise Nutrition  (3 credit hours)  

Metabolism of macro- and micronutrients as affected by exercise and physical activity. Effects of dietary patterns, specific foods, dietary supplements and ergogenic aids on sports performance. Reading and discussion of current literature and individual or group projects.

Prerequisite: NTR 400/500

Typically offered in Spring only

NTR 557/FS 557  Nutraceuticals and Functional Foods  (3 credit hours)  

This course evaluates the weight of evidence from peer-reviewed scientific literature relating food bioactives, whole foods, and diets to disease prevention, athletic performance, and cognitive development/enhancement. Data are viewed in the context of processing effects, global food and supplement regulations, as well as commercial marketing claims. Key concepts include dose-response, signal transduction, and the use of advanced technologies such as genomics, proteomics and metabolomics. Students will work in teams to develop and write a critical review manuscript suitable for publication.

Typically offered in Fall only

NTR 561/ANS 561  Equine Nutrition  (3 credit hours)  

This course explores concepts in equine nutrition including digestive physiology of horses, nutrient requirements for different classes of horses and feed management. Ration evaluation and balancing, as well as problem solving will be a core component to this course.

Prerequisite:NTR 500 or NTR/FS 501 or NTR/PO 515

Typically offered in Spring only

NTR 565/ANS 565  Advanced Canine and Feline Nutrition  (3 credit hours)  

This course is about the advanced principles of nutrition within canines and felines. The course focuses on the unique gastro- intestinal tracts for the two species as well as their specific nutrient requirements and how the animal industry addresses these needs.

Restriction: Graduate Student or Senior with 3.35 GPA; Prerequisite: 400-level Nutrition Course

Typically offered in Fall only

NTR 594  Special Topics in Nutrition  (1-6 credit hours)  

The study of special problems and selected topics of current interest in nutrition and related fields.

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

NTR 601  Master's Seminar  (1 credit hours)  

Weekly seminars on topics of current interest given by resident faculty members, graduate students and visiting lecturers.

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

NTR 624  Topical Problems In Nutrition  (1-6 credit hours)  

Analysis of current problems in nutrition. Also entails the scientific appraisal and solution of a selected problem designed to provide training and experience in research.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or Senior standing

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

NTR 625  Advanced Special Problems In Nutrition  (1-6 credit hours)  

Directed research in a specialized phase of nutrition designed to provide experience in research methodology and philosophy.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing

Typically offered in Spring only

NTR 685  Master's Supervised Teaching  (1-3 credit hours)  

Teaching experience under the mentorship of faculty who assist the student in planning for the teaching assignment, observe and provide feedback to the student during the teaching assignment, and evaluate the student upon completion of the assignment.

Prerequisite: Master's student

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

NTR 690  Advanced Special Problems In Nutrition  (1-6 credit hours)  

Directed research in a specialized phase of nutrition designed to provide experience in research methodology and philosophy.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing

Typically offered in Fall only

NTR 693  Master's Supervised Research  (1-9 credit hours)  

Instruction in research and research under the mentorship of a member of the Graduate Faculty.

Prerequisite: Master's student

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

NTR 695  Master's Thesis Research  (1-9 credit hours)  

Thesis research

Prerequisite: Master's student

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

NTR 696  Summer Thesis Research  (1 credit hours)  

For graduate students whose programs of work specify no formal course work during a summer session and who will be devoting full time to thesis research.

Prerequisite: Master's student

Typically offered in Summer only

NTR 699  Research In Nutrition  (1-9 credit hours)  

Original research preparatory to the thesis for Master of Science or Doctor of Philosophy degree.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

NTR 701/ANS 701  Protein and Amino Acid Metabolism  (3 credit hours)  

Study of protein and amino acid metabolism, regulation, dietary requirements and techniques for their investigation in human and other animals.

Prerequisite: BCH 453, ZO 421, a 400-level nutrition course

Typically offered in Spring only

NTR 706/FM 706  Vitamin Metabolism  (3 credit hours)  

Structures, chemical and physical properties, functions, distribution, absorption, transport, metabolism, storage, excretion, deficiencies, and toxicity of vitamins in humans and domestic animals. Interactions between vitamins and other factors affecting vitamin metabolism or bioavailability as well as the nutritional significance of essential fatty acids and metabolism of prostaglandins, prostacyclins and leukotrienes. Application of knowledge will include critical review of scientific literature, experimental design, and formulation of vitamin supplements.

Prerequisite: ANS(NTR,PO) 415 and BCH 453

Typically offered in Fall only

NTR 708  Energy Metabolism  (3 credit hours)  

Relationship of biochemical and physiological events within the cell, tissue, organ and system with the nutrient needs as sources of energy for productive animal life. Digestion, absorption and metabolism of energy sources. Presentation of processesof energy transformations within living structures in relation to energetics, biological oxidations, coupled reactions, anabolic and catabolic systems, metabolic control, partitioning and efficiency.

Prerequisite: BCH 453 and an introductory NTR course

Typically offered in Fall only

NTR 764/PHY 764/CBS 764  Advances in Gastrointestinal Pathophysiology  (3 credit hours)  

This course will focus on advanced gastrointestinal physiology and the pathophysiology of deseases of relevance to scientsts involved in animal-related research. In particular, the course will cover the pathophysiology of ulceration, infectious diarrhea, ischemia, motility disorders, and inflammatory diseases of the gut. An in-depth review paper will be required based on recent literature rgarding a specific gastrointestinal disease.

Prerequisite: PHY 503, PHY 504

Typically offered in Fall only

NTR 775/PO 775  Mineral Metabolism  (3 credit hours)  

Requirements, function, distribution, absorption, excretion and toxicity of minerals in humans and domestic animals. Interactions between minerals and other factors affecting mineral metabolism or availability. Emphasis on mechanisms associated withmineral functions and the metabolic bases for the development of signs of deficiency.

Prerequisite: ANS(NTR,PO) 415, BCH 451 and ZO 421

Typically offered in Fall only

NTR 790/FM 790  Advanced Feed Formulation  (3 credit hours)  

Principles of feed and ingredient quality assurance and how to develop a comprehensive quality assurance program. The course will include the development of an approved supplier list, ingredient specifications, feed manufacturing quality assurance procedures, and risk based feed safety programs.

Prerequisite: NTR(FM) 525

Typically offered in Fall only

NTR 794  Special Topics in Nutrition  (1-6 credit hours)  

The study of special problems and selected topics of current interest in nutrition and related fields.

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

NTR 801  Doctoral Seminar  (1 credit hours)  

Weekly seminars on topics of current interest given by resident faculty members, graduate students and visiting lecturers.

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

NTR 824  Topical Problems In Nutrition  (1-6 credit hours)  

Analysis of current problems in nutrition. Also entails the scientific appraisal and solution of a selected problem designed to provide training and experience in research.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or Senior standing

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

NTR 825  Advanced Special Problems In Nutrition  (1-6 credit hours)  

Directed research in a specialized phase of nutrition designed to provide experience in research methodology and philosophy.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing

Typically offered in Fall only

NTR 885  Doctoral Supervised Teaching  (1-3 credit hours)  

Teaching experience under the mentorship of faculty who assist the student in planning for the teaching assignment, observe and provide feedback to the student during the teaching assignment, and evaluate the student upon completion of the assignment.

Prerequisite: Doctoral student

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

NTR 890  Doctoral Preliminary Examination  (1-9 credit hours)  

For students who are preparing for and taking written and/or oral preliminary exams.

Prerequisite: Doctoral student

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

NTR 893  Doctoral Dissertation Research  (1-9 credit hours)  

Instruction in research and research under the mentorship of a member of the Graduate Faculty.

Prerequisite: Doctoral student

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

NTR 895  Doctoral Dissertation Research  (1-9 credit hours)  

Dissertation research.

Prerequisite: Doctoral student

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

NTR 896  Summer Dissertation Research  (1 credit hours)  

For graduate students whose programs of work specify no formal course work during a summer session and who will be devoting full time to thesis research.

Prerequisite: Doctoral student

Typically offered in Summer only

NTR 899  Doctoral Dissertation Preparation  (1-9 credit hours)  

For students who have completed all credit hour, full-time enrollment, preliminary examination, and residency requirements for the doctoral degree, and are writing and defending their dissertations.

Prerequisite: Doctoral student

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer