History (HI)

HI 205  Western Civilization Since 1400  (3 credit hours)  

A survey of Western Civilization from the Renaissance to the present.

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

HI 207  Ancient Mediterranean World  (3 credit hours)  

The ancient cultures of the Middle East, Greece and Rome, including Mesopotamian, Egyptian, Hebrew, Phoenician, Greek and Roman societies and cultures.

GEP Global Knowledge, GEP Humanities

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

HI 208  The Middle Ages  (3 credit hours)  

Medieval civilization as it emerged from the declining Roman Empire through its apogee in the 13th century. The transition from the classical to the medieval world, the impact of the Germanic influx, the Islamic influence, the Crusades, and the political, economic, and social institutions of the High Middle Ages.

GEP Global Knowledge, GEP Humanities

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

HI 209  From Renaissance to Revolution: The Origins of Modern Europe  (3 credit hours)  

Exploration of the political, economic, social, and cultural history of Western Europe during an intense and exciting period of transition from a medieval to a modern world. Topics to be discussed include Renaissance art and philosophy; the printing revolution and the French Revolution; climate change and economic dislocation; witchcraze; religious reforms and religious wars; commercialization; navigation; empire; slavery; the new science; and new ideas about democracy, equality, and modernity.

GEP Global Knowledge, GEP Humanities

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

HI 210  Modern Europe 1815-Present  (3 credit hours)  

Survey of the history of European societies and political systems from 1815 to the present.

GEP Global Knowledge, GEP Humanities

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

HI 214  History and Archaeology of Ancient Latin America  (3 credit hours)  

Exploration of ancient Latin American civilizations and early Europeans in the region through archaeological and historical analysis. Major themes include migrations of people into the Western hemisphere, the rise and decline of states and empires such as the Maya, Aztecs, Moche, and Incas, inter-regional trade, development of writing and communication systems, religious ideology, social and political infrastructure and mechanisms of control. Unique cultural forms discussed include mummies, pyramids, military techniques, political propaganda, and agricultural innovation. Contemporary issues addressed include media representations of the past, indigenous rights, and looting and destruction of cultural property.

GEP Global Knowledge, GEP Humanities

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 215  Latin America to 1826  (3 credit hours)  

Exploration of the pre-Hispanic indigenous roots and the colonial period in Latin America. Major themes include the origins and development of social, political, economic and religious institutions from pre-conquest times to the achievement of independence. Topics include ancient American cultures, conquest and settlement by Spain and Portugal, colonial rule in theory and practice, religious life and structures, the colonial economy and labor, and independence movements.

GEP Global Knowledge, GEP Humanities

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

HI 216  Latin America Since 1826  (3 credit hours)  

Analysis of the last two centuries of social, political, economic, and intellectual life in Latin America and the Caribbean. Course readings include primary sources, declassified CIA documents, and Latin American literature. Course themes include social and political conflicts, changing gender relations, human rights abuses, the effect of the US and global economic forces, and the impact of the growing Latino population in the U.S.

GEP Global Knowledge, GEP Humanities

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

HI 217  Caribbean History  (3 credit hours)  

Exploration of the social, economic, political, intellectual, and cultural histories of the Caribbean. Major course topics include pre-Columbian indigeneity, colonization & imperialism, plantation slavery, abolition & emancipation, the Haitian and Cuban Revolutions, gender & migration, and decolonization & independence. The course emphasizes the diversity of the region and places the islands of the Caribbean within the wider context of a modern globalizing world.

GEP Global Knowledge, GEP Humanities

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 221  British History to 1688  (3 credit hours)  

History of the British peoples from earliest times to the Glorious Revolution. Social, political, constitutional developments; relationship between history and literature; synthesis of British cultures.

GEP Global Knowledge, GEP Humanities

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 222  History of British Cultures and Societies From 1688  (3 credit hours)  

British people from Glorious Revolution to the present. Social, political, constitutional development; history and literature; growth and decline of British empire; spread of British culture.

GEP Global Knowledge, GEP Humanities

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

HI 232  The World from 1200 to 1750  (3 credit hours)  

The making of the modern world through interregional conquest and commerce from 1200 to 1750. Focus on the growing global circulation of peoples, pathogens, goods, and ideas.

GEP Global Knowledge, GEP Humanities

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

HI 233  The World Since 1750  (3 credit hours)  

This course surveys the making of the world from 1750 to the present. Topics include: the Industrial Revolution, the development of the Nation-States, the rise of European, American and Japanese Empires, WWI, inter-war reconfigurations of colonial empires, anti-colonial nationalist movements, the Great Depression, the Cold War, struggles for political and economic independence among newly independent nations, the US-dominated neo-liberal order from the 1980s to the present, and contemporary global conflicts over ethnicity, religion, resources, disease, and the environment.

GEP Global Knowledge, GEP Humanities

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

HI 240/HA 240  Introduction to Visual Culture  (3 credit hours)  

Introduction to the role of visual cultural production in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries in expressing and shaping both individual and collective identities. Case studies of imperialism, gender, and war draw from different regional histories and utilize a variety of visual genres - such as photography, popular posters, painting, advertising, and film stills - to study how visual culture can be used as evidence to understand the past, using the approaches of the disciplines of History and Art History.

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

GEP Global Knowledge, GEP Humanities, GEP Interdisciplinary Perspectives

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 251  American History I  (3 credit hours)  

Themes in early American history: colonial clash and mix of cultures; generation of an American consciousness; federalism and democracy in national politics; expansion and immigration; racial and sectional division. Credit is not allowed for both HI 251

GEP Humanities

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

HI 252  American History II  (3 credit hours)  

Themes in post-Civil War American history: impact of war on American foreign and domestic policy; the repercussions of industrialization and economic modernization; continuity and change in American institutions and values; problem solving in pluralisti

GEP Humanities

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

HI 253  Early American History  (3 credit hours)  

Themes in early American history with an emphasis on diversity in the U.S.; focus on colonial clash and mix of cultures, generation of an American consciousness, federalism and democracy in national politics, expansion and immigration, and racial and sectional division. Credit is not allowed for both HI 253 and HI 251.

GEP Humanities, GEP U.S. Diversity

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

HI 254  Modern American History  (3 credit hours)  

Major themes in modern American history with an emphasis on diversity in the United States; focuses on aspects of race/ethnicity, gender, class, sexual orientation, disability, religious and/or age identities as it considers the impacts of industrialization and economic modernization; impact of war on American domestic and foreign policy; continuity and change in American institutions and values; problem solving in a pluralistic society. Credit is not allowed for both HI 254 and HI 252.

X: Credit not allowed for both HI 254 and HI 252.

GEP Humanities, GEP U.S. Diversity

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

HI 263  Asian Civilizations to 1800  (3 credit hours)  

The history of China, India, Japan, and Southeast Asia from 500 to 1800. The making of the Asian region through the rise and fall of five great empires: the Tang, the Mongol, the Mughal, the Qing, and the British empires.

GEP Global Knowledge, GEP Humanities

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

HI 264  Modern Asia: 1800 to Present  (3 credit hours)  

Introductory survey of 19th and 20th century Asia, with attention to Japan, Southeast Asia, India and China. Emphasis on cultural and political crises of the 19th century and revolutionary transformations of the 20th century.

GEP Global Knowledge, GEP Humanities

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

HI 270  Modern Middle East  (3 credit hours)  

Social and political change in the Middle East in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Decline of the Ottoman empire, the rise of nationalism, the waxing and waning of European imperialism in the region, and the creation of modern states and societies and their ideological and economic underpinnings.

GEP Global Knowledge, GEP Humanities

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

HI 275/AFS 275  Introduction to History of South and East Africa  (3 credit hours)  

The African kingdoms (Lunda, Buganda, and Zulu); the European encroachment; the origins of colonialism and the character of colonial societies and economies, South African apartheid; African protest, nationalism and independence.

GEP Global Knowledge, GEP Humanities

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

HI 276/AFS 276  Introduction to History of West Africa  (3 credit hours)  

The history of Western Africa. Forest civilizations and the slave trade, trade and the expansion of Islam, colonialism in West Africa; African nationalism and the achievement of independence; and postcolonial West Africa.

GEP Global Knowledge, GEP Humanities

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 298  Special Topics in History  (1-3 credit hours)  

Presentation of material normally not available in regular history course offerings, or offering of new introductory courses on a trial basis. Students cannot receive credit for multiple sections of HI 298 unless the topics are different.

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

HI 300  Sophomore Seminar in History  (3 credit hours)  

Introduction to the process of researching and writing history. Techniques for locating and interpreting primary sources. The craft of historical writing. Analysis and criticism of the varieties of history. Basic computer literacy: basic computingterms, electronic mail, online searching of the NCSU Libraries, use of the Internet, and word processing.

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing, History Majors

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

HI 305  Frauds and Mysteries of the Past  (3 credit hours)  

Myths, mysteries, misconceptions, and hoaxes in history and archaeology. Examination of popular fascinations with the past, fallacies invoked in historical myths, and misappropriation of the past. Students learn about and implement methods and evidence used by scholars to interpret past peoples and events, logic, skepticism, and critical thinking, interpretative, and analytical skills. Students apply these skills in discussions, in-class activities, and creative assignments to debunk and disprove inaccurate and problematic claims about the past. Case studies of topics such as: stereotypes about early humans, Atlantis, mythical beasts, pyramid alignment, conspiracy theories, art fakes and forgeries, and alien visitations.

GEP Humanities, GEP Interdisciplinary Perspectives

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 307  Jewish History  (3 credit hours)  

Survey of major topics in the history of the Jews, focusing on the development of Jewish life on the European continent but also covering the patterns of migration that created a global diaspora as well as the forces that formed modern Israel.

GEP Global Knowledge, GEP Humanities

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 317  Cuba Today: Historical and Sociopolitical Perspectives  (3 credit hours)  

This course, offered in Havana, Cuba, through the Study Abroad Office, examines Cuban political, social and economic dynamics through historical and sociopolitical perspectives. It explores the process and legacy of colonization, the role of slavery in colonial society, Santeria, healthcare, education and international relations in revolutionary Cuba. In order to take this course, students must be degree seeking and it must count towards their degree.

GEP Global Knowledge, GEP Humanities

Typically offered in Summer only

HI 318  Environmental History of Cuba: Prehistory to the Present  (3 credit hours)  

This course, offered in Havana, Cuba, is designed to introduce students to the environmental history of the country, from the pre-history to present. Among the core topics examined are the social, economic and environmental impacts of sugar, tobacco and coffee cultivation, the relationships between animal husbandry and deforestation, and the history of foreign tourism and its environmental implications. The course closes with an examination of the "Special Period" in Cuba beginning in 1989, and the rise of organic and urban agriculture in Cuba. In order to take this course, students must be degree seeking and it must count towards their degree.

GEP Interdisciplinary Perspectives

Typically offered in Summer only

HI 320/REL 320  Religion in American History  (3 credit hours)  

Representative people, movements and thought in the major religions within the context of American society and culture.

GEP Humanities, GEP U.S. Diversity

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 321  Scientific Revolution and European Society, 1500-1800  (3 credit hours)  

Exploration of the changing role that the arts, technology, and sciences played in shaping early modern European culture, society, and global power, between 1500 and 1800. Examination of the historical context of developments such as machine-making, new scientific ideas, patronage of science and technology, the formation of distinct technical and scientific fields, nation-building projects, and global ventures.

GEP Global Knowledge, GEP Humanities, GEP Interdisciplinary Perspectives

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 322  Rise of Modern Science  (3 credit hours)  

Analysis of how "modern" science developed in Europe since the 1500s, exploring the foundation of the ideas, scientific practices, institutions, and cultural meaning and power of science in modern society. Examples taken from the creation of the mechanistic worldview and Newtonian science, and the development of modern disciplines such as chemistry, geology, biology, and physics.

GEP Interdisciplinary Perspectives

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

HI 323  Science, American Style  (3 credit hours)  

Exploration of the distinctive nature of American science and its place in American culture. Analysis of the historical context of developments, such as early contributions to science, natural history, and paleontology; the growth of professionalization of science; ideas about scientific management and social applications such as eugenics; and the creation of the atomic bomb and the rise of "Big Science" after WWII.

GEP Interdisciplinary Perspectives

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 324  History of Common Law and Constitution  (3 credit hours)  

Survey of the development of common law and constitution from the earliest Roman and Anglo-Saxon beginnings to the era of the French and American Revolutions. The focus will be on the European social, political and intellectual contexts within which Anglo-American law emerged, and the foundations of legal and constitutional principles. Topics include the origins of courts and the judiciary; the evolution of jury trial and the early history of the law of evidence; conflicts and compromised between secular and ecclesiastical law; rights and limits to property ownership at common law; and problems regarding the legal status of women, children, servants and slaves.

GEP Global Knowledge, GEP Humanities

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 332  Germany and the World Wars  (3 credit hours)  

Germany's rise as a world power in the years prior to World War i, the emergence of Adolf Hitler and national socialism, and the consequences in defeat of World War II. Topics include nationalism, industrialism and the struggle of workers, imperialism, religious minorities and racial theories, sexual revolution, democratization, international relations and war, postwar occupation and reconstruction, and popular culture in music and film.

Prerequisite:3 hrs of History or Sophomore Standing

GEP Global Knowledge, GEP Humanities

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 335  The World at War  (3 credit hours)  

Comparative history of the experience of war over time and place. Topics include the interactions between war and society; effects on combatants and non-combatants, especially women and children; and the role of technology.

GEP Global Knowledge, GEP Humanities

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

HI 337  Spy vs. Spy: Cold War Intelligence History  (3 credit hours)  

This course will examine the often deadly intelligence efforts that characterized the Cold War (USA vs. USSR) of 1945-1991. While the history of that era marks the major political, economic, and military events, much occurred in the shadows. This wide-ranging intelligence competition affected - and was affected by - both American and Russian societies and cultures. Drawing on selected readings, this course will seek to describe this struggle to know and to conceal, and offer useful context to explain how and why it influenced the course of the Cold War.

GEP Humanities

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 338  Empire, War, and Revolution in Russia  (3 credit hours)  

Survey of Russian history since the advent of modern reform following the 1861 Serf Emancipation. The course treats the failure of an increasingly outdated monarchy to cope with the rise of an influential urban educated class, and industrial work force, and Populist and Marxist revolutionary movements. The course traces the degeneration of the 1917 socialist revolution into a hardened dictatorship which, forced by conditions outside its control, waged a destructive but victorious war, saving Europe from Nazism. It treats the 1991 Soviet collapse and the challenges and failures of the post-Stalin and post-Soviet periods.

GEP Global Knowledge, GEP Humanities

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 340  History of Agriculture  (3 credit hours)  

An introduction to the history of agriculture from a global perspective. The course explores our evolving relationship with plants and animals, including the earliest experiments in domestication and husbandry, short- and long-term developmental trajectories, local- and global-scale patterns, and coverage of diverse places and times. Themes include agricultural practices, food systems, landscape transformations, technological innovations, social and political organization, inequality, exploitation, food security, and sustainability.

GEP Global Knowledge, GEP Humanities

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 341  Technology in History  (3 credit hours)  

The role of technology in society from earliest times to the present. Major achievements in technology and an examination of the nature of invention, innovation and adaptation of technologies and their impact on Western Civilization.

GEP Interdisciplinary Perspectives

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

HI 344  Dinomania: Dinosaurs in Culture and Science  (3 credit hours)  

The cultural and scientific history of dinosaurs as simultaneously an object of scientific knowledge and of popular culture. Attention will be paid to early dinosaur discoveries and interpretations, the competitive exploration for dinosaurs in the US West and other exotic places, the origin and international spread of dinomania, dinosaurs as cultural icons, and the ways that dinosaurs have been represented in the media and in public museums. This course will include critical discussion of how natural science is done, how ideas about dinosaurs are culturally embedded, and how and why those ideas change over time.

GEP Interdisciplinary Perspectives

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 345  American Popular Culture  (3 credit hours)  

Popular culture as reflection of as well as contributor to American historical trends. Changes in forms of entertainment (music, books, popular art, theater, film, television, etc.), from the artisanal culture of the late 18th century through the rise of 19th- and early 20th-century commercial culture to the evolution of mass media culture in the late 20th and early 21st centuries.

GEP Humanities

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 346  The Civil War Era in Popular Culture  (3 credit hours)  

Survey of the causes, trajectories, and consequences of the American Civil War and the social, political, and economic struggles of Reconstruction. Draws on history and literary studies to investigate how Americans represented and misrepresented the Civil War era, through an examination of popular culture. Emphasis on conflicts concerning regional identity, race, class, gender, and sexuality in the history and memory of the Civil War era.

GEP Humanities, GEP Interdisciplinary Perspectives, GEP U.S. Diversity

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 350  American Military History  (3 credit hours)  

American military experience and its relationship to other historical developments. Use of military force in terms of strategy and tactics and as an element in the nation's diplomatic, political, social, economic and intellectual life.

GEP Humanities

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 351  U.S. Naval History  (3 credit hours)  

The role of the U.S. Navy in American history. Sea power, national defense and foreign policy. The impact of technology on naval warfare and the historical evolution of missions of the U.S. Navy.

GEP Humanities

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 354  The Rise of the American Empire  (3 credit hours)  

This course investigates the rise of the American Empire from the Spanish American War of 1898 through the 2001 attacks on the World Trade Center. The purpose of the course is not only to acquaint you with the crises and triumphs of US foreign policy from 1898 to 2001, but also to help you develop your own analysis of whether the acquisition of empire was accidental or deliberate, or a combination of both.

GEP Humanities

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 360  U.S. Agricultural History  (3 credit hours)  

U.S. Agricultural history from colonial era to present. Attention to the major economic, social, political, environmental and cultural forces that shaped American agriculture from the 16th century to 21st century. Discussion of the role of technological change and evolution of governmental policy in U.S. agriculture. Exposure to major episodes demonstrating fundamental changes and continuities in U.S. agriculture. Discussion of the diversity of American farmers and farmworkers and their struggles for equality and access.

GEP Humanities, GEP U.S. Diversity

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 364  History of North Carolina  (3 credit hours)  

History of North Carolina from early European exploration to the present. Features of North Carolina society which made this state similar to and different from other southern states and the nation as a whole.

GEP Humanities

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

HI 365  The American West  (3 credit hours)  

A history of the American borderlands with emphasis on the trans-Mississippi West. Cycles of exploration, conquest, and exploitation of this region. Influence of the frontier in the development of the United States.

GEP Humanities, GEP U.S. Diversity

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 366  Native American History  (3 credit hours)  

An introductory interpretation of the varied historical experiences of many nations native to North America from the first migrations of peoples into the continent until the present, including the variety and diversity of Indian cultures and experiences; native resistance to colonialism, expansion, and U.S. federal policies; and the survival and continuity of native cultures and peoples through more than four centuries of contact, conquest, and change.

GEP Humanities, GEP U.S. Diversity

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 369  Sexuality in U.S. History  (3 credit hours)  

Exploration of the social construction of sexualities from the early seventeenth century to the present day. This course will focus on the United States, but we will begin with the history of sexuality in early modern Europe to see where ideas of sexuality in colonial America had their roots. We will proceed through the chronological development of the history of sexuality in North America. Throughout the semester, we will explore dominant and alternative constructions of sexuality; trace the changing and contested meanings of sexuality; and explore the implications of these understandings in sexuality for power relations in the history of the United States. While issues of gender and race frequently intersect with sexuality, we will be focused primarily on the latter.

GEP Humanities, GEP U.S. Diversity

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 370  Modern Egypt  (3 credit hours)  

Exploration of the political, socio-economic, and cultural history of Egypt from the end of the 18th century (the 1798 exploration led by Bonaparte) to the present day; including the late Ottoman period (1798-1805), the birth of the modern state (1805-1922), Egypt's liberal experiment (1922 - 1952), the Nasser era (1952-1970), the neo-liberal age (since 1970), and concluding with the January 25th Revolution. The investigation follows two main threads: the conflictual relationships that developed over the past two centuries between the state and society in all its diversity, and the continuous struggle over the definition of the Egyptian nation that these conflicts have generated.

GEP Global Knowledge, GEP Humanities

Typically offered in Spring and Summer

HI 371  Modern Japan, 1850 to Present  (3 credit hours)  

Survey of Japan's emergence as a modern nation and world power. Topics include nation-state formation; modernization and its dislocations; democratization and authoritarianism; imperialism, international politics, and war; postwar reforms; changing gender relations; popular culture; and social problems.

Prerequisite: 3 hours of History or Sophomore standing

GEP Global Knowledge, GEP Humanities

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 372/AFS 372  African-American History Through the Civil War, 1619-1865  (3 credit hours)  

African background and continuity of the particular role, experience and influence of African Americans in the United States through the Civil War.

GEP Humanities, GEP U.S. Diversity

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 373/AFS 373  African-American History Since 1865  (3 credit hours)  

The history of African-Americans from the Reconstruction era through the Civil Rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s to the present.

GEP Humanities, GEP U.S. Diversity

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 374  Visual Culture of Modern South Asia  (3 credit hours)  

History of visual-cultural production in expressing and shaping socio-political configurations in the South Asian subcontinent. Treats visual evidence over 300 years to understand the integrative relationship and flow of cultural production across elite

GEP Global Knowledge, GEP Humanities

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 375  Global History of Travel and Tourism  (3 credit hours)  

This course traces the development of travel and tourism from ancient times to modern days, examining it as an agent that both produces and reflects social-cultural activities. It draws on different travel-energized materials-from topographic descriptions to sentimental narratives-to examine how people traveled long distances for various reasons and to analyze their impressions of foreign lands and reflections on their home population. Topics include how the crossing of boundaries reflected and reshaped the meanings of place, the formation of identity, the spread of religion and aesthetics, the accumulation of knowledge and scientific empiricism, as well as the consumption of visual and material culture.

GEP Global Knowledge, GEP Humanities

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 380  History of Nonprofits, Philanthropy, and Social Change  (3 credit hours)  

This course explores the historical development of nonprofits and philanthropy in the United States from the colonial period to the present: the origins of charity and philanthropy as concepts for social change and social justice, the rise of benevolent societies in the nineteenth century, the creation of philanthropic foundations and advocacy organizations in the twentieth century, and the construction of complex relationships between modern nonprofits, the state, and the private sector.

GEP Humanities

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 381  NGO Nonprofits in a Global Context  (3 credit hours)  

Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) are a crucial component and a revealing characteristic of the strength and effectiveness of a country's civil society. Examining their histories outside of the U.S. gives us a window into global culture, values, and modes of everyday life, and into notions about "charity" and "public good" in a given society. We will use India as a case study to develop a set of questions about how NGOs function in different societies, examining how researchers and activists partner with NGOs in different parts of the world to address pressing environmental, economic, social, and cultural-production issues.

GEP Global Knowledge, GEP Humanities

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 382  History of Capitalism in America  (3 credit hours)  

The phrase "capitalism in America" raises big questions, and this course will look at such questions as: What is capitalism anyway? What was the relation between slavery and capitalism? Is capitalism the story of heroic entrepreneurs who through vision and courage built new enterprises? Has the government played any positive role in American capitalism or has it just stood in the way? Is fraud an aberration or an essential part of capitalism? Why has America had all these financial crises and how have Americans responded to them? Is capitalism in the twenty-first century something new or is it just a continuation of longer trends? Is it even reasonable to talk about capitalism in the United States alone?

GEP Humanities, GEP Interdisciplinary Perspectives, GEP U.S. Diversity

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 385  Introduction to Public History  (3 credit hours)  

History is about people: their societies, economies, cultures, and politics and how these changed over time. In Public History, history is also for people, in that careful and exacting historical research can facilitate dialogue and be applied to contemporary problems. Just as important, Public History is history saved, researched, and analyzed with people, for public historians work with individuals and groups to collaboratively understand history and preserve historical resources for future generations. This class treats the major concepts, scholarship, and research methods shaping the Public History field; it is also an opportunity to test the fields theories in projects that will create new resources for historical learning in our community. Required field trip fee of $10.

GEP Humanities, GEP U.S. Diversity

Typically offered in Fall and Summer

HI 390  Internship in History  (3 credit hours)  

Directed work experience for history students with internship-site mentoring and evaluation. Engagement in the community as a practitioner. Course requires 140 contact hours with the sponsoring organization. The course includes an on-campus class meeting and presentation at the end of the semester. Students must have at least a 3.0 overall GPA and at least a 3.0 GPA in the major, be a junior or senior, and must complete the application process with the Department of History. Students must provide their own transportation to the internship site. Modest liability insurance fee required.

Prerequisite: Juniors & Seniors with Cumulative GPA of 3.0 or above and 3.0 GPA or above in History courses, HI 300 and 12 hours of History courses and consent of the department

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

HI 395  History: Study Abroad  (1-3 credit hours)  

Topical History courses taught in NCSU Study Abroad programs. (Current listings available in Study Abroad Office, CHASS Dean's Office and History Department).

Prerequisite: 3 hours of History or Sophomore standing

HI 400/HI 500  Civilization of the Ancient Near East  (3 credit hours)  

The civilization of Mesopotamia and Egypt from earliest times to the fall of Babylon in 539 B.C. Credit for both HI 400 and HI 500 is not allowed

Prerequisite: 3 hours of History

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 402/REL 402  Early Christianity to the Time of Eusebius  (3 credit hours)  

Growth and diffusion of early Christianity from the end of the first century up to the time of Eusebius and the conversion of Constantine (early fourth century); Christianity in its Greco-Roman environment; Roman policy towards Christianity; heterodox C

Prerequisite, one of: REL 312, REL 317, or HI 207.

GEP Global Knowledge, GEP Humanities

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 403/HI 503  Ancient Greek Civilization  (3 credit hours)  

The history of the Hellenes from the Minoan civilization through Alexander's legacy, with readings in Herodotus and Thucydides. Credit will not be given for both HI 403 and HI 503.

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 404/HI 504  Rome to 337 A.D.  (3 credit hours)  

The development of ancient Rome from its origins in Italy, through the rise as an Empire embracing the entire Mediterranean World and Western Europe, to Constantine, Christianity and the foundation of Constantinople. Examines critically the political achievement of a people who rose from an obscure Italian city to a world empire, with emphasis on the analysis of primary sources. Credit will not be given for both HI 404 and HI 504

P: 3 hrs. of History

HI 405/HI 505  History and Archaeology of the Roman Empire  (3 credit hours)  

Analysis of Rome's rule over the Mediterranean World in the first four centuries A.D. through the use of literary and archaelologic sources. Special emphasis on imperial army and frontier security. Credit will not be given for both H1 405 and H1 505

P: 3 hrs. of History

HI 406/HI 506  From Roman Empire to Middle Ages  (3 credit hours)  

Late Antiquity and the early Middle Ages. The transition from classical civilization to the basis of modern civilizations; the fall of Rome, the Germanic kingdoms, Byzantium, the establishment of Christianity, the birth and growth of Islam. Credit will not be given for both HI 406 and HI 506

P: 3 hrs. of History

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 407/REL 407  Islamic History to 1798  (3 credit hours)  

The history of the Islamic Near East to 1798. Topics include the East Mediterranean before Islam, Muhammad and the development of Islam, sources of Muslim civilization, Islamic law, science, philosophy, art and architecture, Islam in Spain, India, Asia and Africa, the Crusades, the Ottomans, Islam and Europe. Credit will not be given for both REL/HI 407 and REL/HI 507.

Prerequisite: 3 hrs HI or REL 300 or above

GEP Global Knowledge, GEP Humanities

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 408/REL 408  Islam in the Modern World  (3 credit hours)  

Evolution of modern Islam from 17th century to the present. Primary emphasis on North Africa, the Middle East and South Asia. Pre-modern Islamicate empires, reform and revival. Historical origins of current issues in the Islamic world. Students cannot receive credit for both REL/HI 408 and REL/HI 508.

Prerequisite: 3 hours of history or religious studies

GEP Global Knowledge, GEP Humanities

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 409/HI 509  The High Middle Ages  (3 credit hours)  

Medieval culture from 10th through 13th centuries: revival of the Roman Empire, monastic and papal reform, rise of universities, evolution of representative bodies, the Gothic style, troubadour and goliardic poetry, scholasticism, and revival of Roman law. Credit will not be given for both HI 409 and HI 509

P: 3 hrs. of History

HI 410  Italian Renaissance  (3 credit hours)  

The historical, literary, and cultural developments defining the "Renaissance" period of Italian history from the late fourteenth century to the end of the sixteenth century. Topics include critical analysis of the concept of a "renaissance" and its usefulness for historical interpretation; the intersection of politics, religion, society, art, and literature in relation to defining a "Renaissance" culture; and the development of a global money economy and the cultural output it inspired in Europe.

P: 3 hrs. of History

GEP Global Knowledge, GEP Humanities

Typically offered in Fall and Summer

HI 411/HI 511  Trials of Faith: Religious Reformation in Early-Modern Europe  (3 credit hours)  

Examination of the great disruption in European civilization associated with the Protestant and Catholic Reformations. The course considers the new religious ideas and practices associated with the Reformations and transformation they produced in European political and economic life; the violence they provoked; the new thinking about families and gender roles they encouraged, the spread of European religions around the globe with European voyages of discovery and conquest, and the beginning of ideas about religious toleration. Credit will not be given for both HI 411 and HI 511.

P: 3 hrs. of History

GEP Global Knowledge

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 412/HI 512  The Sexes and Society in Early-Modern Europe  (3 credit hours)  

Examination of changes in gender relations; ideas about the sexes, femininity, and masculinity; the roles of women and men in political, religious, economic, scientific, and family life in Europe between the late Middle Ages and the French Revolution. Credit for HI 412 and HI 512 is not allowed.

P: 3 hrs. of History

GEP Global Knowledge

HI 414/HI 514  From Kings to Revolution: The History of Early-Modern France  (3 credit hours)  

Examination of the most politically powerful and culturally dominant kingdom in early-modern Europe, which dissolved into a revolution that destroyed its monarchy while establishing ideas about democracy and equality. From the glories of the Versailles palace to the misery of peasant villages, topics include the beginnings of the French state and nation in the warfare and religious conflicts of 1500s, political and economic developments, the growth of an internationally influential French culture, religious change, controversies over gender roles, and the origins of the French Revolution. Credit will not be given for both HI 414 and HI 514.

P: 3 hrs. of History

GEP Global Knowledge

HI 415/HI 515  The French Revolution  (3 credit hours)  

Broadly based analysis of France's first revolutionary era; the enlightenment and its impact, the causes and character of the Revolution in France; impact of these events in France and Europe. Credit will not be given for both HI 415 and HI 515

P: 3 hrs. of History

GEP Global Knowledge

HI 418/HI 518  Fascist Italy and Nazi Germany  (3 credit hours)  

Fascism as a theoretical concept, rise of fascism in Italy and Germany, seizure of power by Mussolini and Hitler, organization of the economy, churches, military, women, youth, and culture under the dictatorships. Students will not receive credit for both HI 418 and HI 518

P: 3 hrs. of History

GEP Global Knowledge

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 419/HI 519  Modern European Imperialism  (3 credit hours)  

Historical background of European overseas expansion; its impact on the economics, politics and culture of both Europe and the colonized world; the significance of imperialism and anti-colonial nationalism in shaping the modern world. Credit will not be given for both HI 419 and HI 519

P: 3 hrs. of History

GEP Global Knowledge

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 421/HI 521  European Intellectual History: The Eighteenth Century  (3 credit hours)  

Historical examination of some of the major figures of the European Enlightenment, beginning with Locke and ending with Kant. Credit will not be given for both HI 421 and HI 521

P: 3 hrs. of History

GEP Global Knowledge

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 422/HI 522  European Intellectual History: The 19th Century  (3 credit hours)  

Historical examination of some of the major figures of European thought during the 19th century, beginning with the enthusiasm of the period of the French Revolution and ending with the disillusionment of the fin de siecle. Credit will not be given for both HI 422 and HI 522

P: 3 hrs. of History

GEP Global Knowledge

HI 423/HI 523  Women in European Enlightenment  (3 credit hours)  

Historical analysis of feminist thought and action during the Enlightenment of the 1700s. Topics include women's role in the development of Western knowledge and science, historical construction of the gendered "nature" of women, education and political resources available to women, and their strategies for emancipation. Credit will not be given for both HI 423 and HI 523.

P: 3 hrs. of History

GEP Global Knowledge

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 425/HI 525  Tudor and Stuart England  (3 credit hours)  

British history from the Reformation through the Civil War. Emphasis on key developments in social, political and economic life: The development of a new concept of kingship, the growing independence of Parliament, the search for religious uniformity and the changing status of the aristocracy and gentry. Credit will not be given for both HI 425 and HI 525

P: 3 hrs. of History

GEP Global Knowledge

HI 429  20th Century Britain  (3 credit hours)  

British political, social and economic history since 1914, with reference to the effects of two world wars, the growth of the Welfare State, Britain's decline as a power, and its search for a new role in the world. Credit will not be given for both HI 429 and HI 529.

Prerequisite: 3 hours of History

GEP Global Knowledge

Typically offered in Summer only

HI 430/HI 530  Modern France  (3 credit hours)  

French history from the downfall of Napoleon I to the present, with a short introductory survey of the Old Regime and the French Revolution. Cultural, social and economic developments and political trends. Credit will not be given for both HI 430 and HI 530

P: 3 hrs. of History

GEP Global Knowledge

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 434/HI 534  Theory and Practice of Digital History  (3 credit hours)  

Introduces students to the theory and practice of digital history. Students will examine theoretical scholarship on digital practices in history, learning how to acquire, edit, process, analyze, and present humanistic data. Students will critique examples of digital history including digital archives, exhibits, scholarship, and teaching resources, and then apply conceptual knowledge in the creation of their own digital history projects. The course is geared to students without prior knowledge of coding. Credit will not be given for both HI 434 and HI 534.

R: Graduate Standing or PBS

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 437  Topics in Central and East European History  (3 credit hours)  

Topical focus on specific problems and events occurring in the region in and between Germany and Russia in modern history. The course is designed to expose advanced undergraduates, principally history majors, to intensive reading, writing, and discussion of focused topics in the subject area. Previous modern European history credit is advised. This course is repeatable once for credit when offered with a different topic.

P: 3 hrs. of History

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 440/HI 540  American Environmental History  (3 credit hours)  

Interactions between humans and their environments in America; environmental focus on themes in American history such as colonial settlement, industrialization, progressivism, the New Deal, the 1960s. Credit will not be given for both HI 440 and HI 540.

Prerequisite: 3 hours of History

GEP Interdisciplinary Perspectives

Typically offered in Fall and Summer

HI 441/HI 541  Colonial and Revolutionary U.S  (3 credit hours)  

Origins of the English colonies in America to the American Revolution. European background to colonization, merging of different cultures, effects of mercantile doctrine, causes of revolution. Credit will not be given for both HI 441 and HI 541

P: 3 Hours of History

HI 443/HI 543  U.S. Constitutional History to 1883  (3 credit hours)  

This course examines the origins and development of the U. S. Constitution from the Articles of Confederation to 1883. The course specifically looks at the federal Convention of 1787, the national bank debate and early constitutional interpretation;the constitution and its interaction with politics, economics, and society; the powers of Congress-taxation, contracts, commerce and war. The course also examines sovereignty, slavery and civil rights. It ends with an analysis of the Civil War Amendments and the transformation in American constitutionalism. Credit for both HI 443 and HI 543 is not allowed

P: 3 hrs. of History

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 444  U.S. Constitutional History Since 1870  (3 credit hours)  

Examines the transformation of American Constitutional thought after the Civil War; the triumph of nationalism and the evolution of a new federal theory; the rise and fall of federal protections of civil rights in the late 19th-century and the CivilRights Revolution in the 20th century. Explores key concepts as civil liberties, judicial activism and judicial restraint; procedural and substantive due process, liberty of contracts and entrepreneurial liberty, Japanese internment, privacy, women and gender issues; explores free speech, religious freedom, civil liberties. Credit for both HI 444 and HI 544 is not allowed.

P: 3 hrs. of History

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 445/HI 545  Early American Borderlands  (3 credit hours)  

Examines the social, political, and cultural development of the eastern American frontiers between the early seventeenth and mid-nineteenth centuries. Addresses the relationships between settlers and environments, settlers and Native Americans. Explores the structure and life of pioneer families, the development of new institutions, the role of governments in regulating settlements, and the evolution of the "frontier myth." Credit cannot be given for both HI 445 and HI 545.

P: 3 hrs. of History

GEP Humanities, GEP U.S. Diversity

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 446/HI 546  Topics in Civil War and Reconstruction  (3 credit hours)  

Examination of the historiography of the American Civil War and Reconstruction. Topics include the origins of the war, military strategy, the northern and southern homefront, nationalism and citizenship, slavery and freed labor, changing gender roles and ideologies, struggles over racial inequality, and conservatism and radicalism during Reconstruction. Credit will not be given for both HI 446 and HI 546.

Prerequisite: 3 hrs. of History

GEP Humanities, GEP U.S. Diversity

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 447/WGS 447/HI 547/WGS 547  Women in America: From Contact to the Civil War  (3 credit hours)  

The historical experience of women in America from Native American and European contact through the colonial period to the immediate post-Civil-War years (to 1890). Topics include the history of women's work, education, legal and political status, religious experience, and sex roles, with consideration of age, class, race, sexual preference, and region as significant variables in women's experience in America. Credit will not be given for both HI (WGS) 447 and HI (WGS) 547.

P: 3 Hours of History

GEP Humanities, GEP U.S. Diversity

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 448/WGS 448/HI 548/WGS 548  American Women in the Twentieth Century  (3 credit hours)  

Women's historical experience in America, 1890-1990. Changes in women's work, education, legal and political status, and sex roles, age, class, race, sexual preference and region as significant variables in women's experience. Credit will not be given for both HI (WGS) 448 and HI (WGS) 548.

P: 3 hrs. of History

GEP Humanities, GEP U.S. Diversity

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 449/HI 549  U.S. Labor to 1900  (3 credit hours)  

This course explores the history of work, workers, and working-class life and labor in the United States from the founding of the first European colonies to the beginning of the twentieth century: bound and free labor in colonial America, the transformation of urban worklife in the decades preceding the Civil War, slavery and class formation in the antebellum South, the effects of immigration on American workers, and the impact of race and gender on workers' solidarity. Credit will not be given for both HI 449 and HI 549.

P: 3 hrs. of History

GEP U.S. Diversity

HI 450  U.S. Labor Since 1900  (3 credit hours)  

This course explores the history of work, workers, and working class organizations in the twentieth century United States; with particular attention to three core issues in twentieth-century American labor history: whether the US South has a particular form of labor history; the historical struggle for workers¨ rights to collectively act and protest; and the intersections between race, ethnicity, immigration and labor in the twentieth-century US. Credit will not be given for both HI 450 and HI 550.

P: 3 hrs. of History

GEP U.S. Diversity

HI 451/HI 551  The Vietnam War  (3 credit hours)  

The Vietnam War in Vietnamese historical context. A study of major works on the legacy of French colonialism; the growth of Vietnamese radicalism and communism; World War II and the Vietnamese Revolution; the French Indochina War and political division

Prerequisite: 3 hours of History

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 452/HI 552  Recent America  (3 credit hours)  

Examination of contemporary opinions and historical interpretations of major problems in American life since 1939, including World War II, its social and economic consequences; Korea and the Cold War, big business and labor; civil rights and feminist movements; countercultures, Vietnam and Watergate. Credit will not be given both for HI 452 and HI 552

P: 3 Hours of History

HI 453/HI 553  United States-Latin American Relations Since 1823  (3 credit hours)  

Critical analysis of the last two centuries of relations between the US and Latin America. Exploration of major policies using primary sources and declassified CIA documents. Major themes include US economic, political, and military influence, covert and overt US interventions, and response by Latin American governments. Historical perspectives on contemporary inter-American problems such as drugs, environment, debt crisis, human rights abuses, and the impact of the Latino population in the U.S. Credit will not be given both for HI 453 and HI 553.

Prerequisite: 3 hrs. of History

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 454  History of U.S. Foreign Relations, 1900-Present  (3 credit hours)  

America's emergence as a world power; American diplomatic history since 1900; the expansion of American economic and cultural relations; the evolution of the American foreign policy bureaucracy; and the historical forces and personalities that have shap

P: 3 hrs. of History

HI 455/AFS 455/HI 555/AFS 555  History of the Civil Rights Movement  (3 credit hours)  

The black revolution; stages and leaders of the movement; successes and failures in the fight for desegregation, the vote, and economic opportunity; impact of Civil Rights movement on the United States. Credit will not be given both for AFS/HI 455 and AFS/HI 555.

P: 3 hrs. of History

GEP Humanities, GEP U.S. Diversity

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 459/HI 559  The Early American Republic  (3 credit hours)  

Examines the social, political, and cultural development of the Early Republic, the period in American history roughly from the Revolutionary War through the Administration of John Quincy Adams. Employs the life of Thomas Jefferson-the quintessential American, as the foundation for delving into the historical problems, interpreting primary sources, and analyzing secondary sources. Encourages graduate students to analyze the ways in which historiographic debates complicate our understanding of the Early American Republic. Credit will not be given for both HI 459 and HI 559.

Prerequisite: 3 hrs. of History

HI 461/HI 561  Civilization of the Old South  (3 credit hours)  

The distinctive features of the Old South as part of the regional development of United States history. Consideration of colonial factors in the making of the South, development of the plantation system and slavery, Southern social order, intellectual and cultural life, economic development, and rise of Southern nationalism. Credit will not be given for both HI 461 and HI 561

Prerequisite: 3 hrs. of History

HI 462/HI 562  Southern History since the Civil War  (3 credit hours)  

Exploration of many American "Souths" from Reconstruction to the present. How race/ethnicity, gender, class, geography, sexuality, and culture inform "Southern" identity; major political and economic changes; and the region's relationship to the nation and the world. Credit will not be given for HI 462 and HI 562.

Prerequisite: 3 hours of History

GEP Humanities, GEP U.S. Diversity

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

HI 463/HI 563  Topics in History and Memory  (3 credit hours)  

Explores how "collective memory" develops. Examines how memory is represented through public speeches, civic celebrations, monuments and memorials, and other forms of popular and political culture. Analyzes what is recalled, what is forgotten, and who decides. Asks why memory is made public. May be repeated once for credit when offered with a different topic. Credit will not be given for both HI 463 and HI 563.

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

HI 465  Oil and Crisis in the Gulf  (3 credit hours)  

Historical roots and development of the Persian Gulf region from the late nineteenth century until the present with an emphasis on the social, economic, cultural and political transformations following the discovery of oil, and subsequent events such as the Arab Oil embargo of 1973, the Iranian Revolution, the Iran-Iraq war, and the two Gulf wars.

P: 3 hrs. of History

GEP Global Knowledge

HI 466  History of the Palestinian-Israeli Conflict  (3 credit hours)  

Historical roots and development of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict from the late nineteenth century until the present through the study of the history and historiography of Zionism, Palestinian nationalism, creation of the state of Israel, establishment of settlements, conflicts and peace negotiations, as well as a study of the impact of this conflict on both Israeli and Palestinian societies, economies and cultures.

P: 3 hrs. of History

GEP Global Knowledge

HI 467  Modern Mexico  (3 credit hours)  

Major developments in Mexican national life since 1821. The 19th century: the era of Santa Anna, the war with the United States, the Reform, the French intervention, and the dictatorship of Profirio Diaz. The 1910 Revolution and the resulting transformation of Mexico's political, social and economic institutions. Reading knowledge of Spanish helpful but not required.

Prerequisite: 3 hours of History

GEP Global Knowledge

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 468/HI 568  Slavery in the Americas  (3 credit hours)  

Exploration of the development of chattel slavery throughout the Americas. Analysis of the emergence and development of New World slavery in ways that encourage students to think critically about the historical processes of abolition, emancipation, and freedom across the Atlantic world. The lectures and readings seek to dislodge the notion that the "history of slavery" only pertains to the United States. The course, instead, emphasizes commonalities and differences in ways that challenge assumptions that the institution was exceptional in any given region. Credit will not be given for both HI 468 and HI 568.

Prerequisite: 3 Hours of History and Junior Standing

GEP Global Knowledge

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 469/HI 569  Latin American Revolutions in the Twentieth Century  (3 credit hours)  

Comparative analysis of causes, participants, process, and outcome of revolutions in Mexico, Bolivia, Cuba, and Central America. Credit for both HI 469 and HI 569 will not be given

P: 3 hrs. of History

GEP Global Knowledge

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 470/HI 570  Exploring World History  (3 credit hours)  

Introduction to the methods, themes, and narratives of world history. As a distinct approach to historical study, world history focuses on dynamic connections and relationships among regions of the world and the variety of global processes - related to trade, religion, production, consumption, migration, imperialism, disease, and technologies - that connected them. The course is a suggested elective for future teachers who will teach world history in high school, as well as an ideal course for History majors and graduate students who want to explore the connections among all the regionally specific upper division courses they have taken. Credit will not be given for both HI 470 and HI 570.

Prerequisite: 3 hours of History

GEP Global Knowledge

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 471/HI 571  Revolutionary China  (3 credit hours)  

China 1900 to present. Examination of political, cultural, and socio-economic revolutionary phases of China's 20th-century transformation from traditional empire to communism. Particular attention to post-1949 problems of nation-building. Credit will not be given for both HI 471 and HI 571

P: 3 hrs. of History

GEP Global Knowledge

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 472  Fashion, Food, and Fun: Material Culture in Chinese History  (3 credit hours)  

Exploration of the history of everyday material culture in China, covering a wide range of physical objects such clothes, tea, architecture, and woodblock printing. Examination of how the material culture of different time periods evolved in response to varying historical factors and contributed to the formation of cultural norms. Focus on both textual and visual historical records, as well as objects from the Gregg Museum.

Prerequisite: 3 hours of History

GEP Global Knowledge

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 473/HI 573  Japan's Empire in Asia, 1868-1945  (3 credit hours)  

An advanced survey of Japanese relations with Asia in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Structures and ideologies of imperialism and colonialism; modernization, nationalism and social change; migration and mobility; resistance and collaboration; and legacies of empire. Credit will not be given for both HI 473 and HI 573

P: 3 hrs. of History

GEP Global Knowledge

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 474  Modern India  (3 credit hours)  

The history of the Indian sub-continent, from the 16th century to the present. Focus on political, economic and cultural change under the Mughal Empire and the British Raj; the problems of independent India, Pakistan and Bangladesh.

Prerequisite: 3 hours of History

GEP Global Knowledge

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 475/AFS 475/HI 575/AFS 575  History of the Republic of South Africa  (3 credit hours)  

Evolution of the Republic of South Africa's society, with emphasis on the interaction of diverse peoples and cultures. Particular attention is given to the period since 1870. Credit will not be given for both HI (AFS) 475 and HI 575.

Prerequisite: 3 hours of History

GEP Global Knowledge

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

HI 476/AFS 476/HI 576/AFS 576  Leadership in Modern Africa  (3 credit hours)  

Recent sub-Saharan African political history (excluding South Africa). Overview of concepts, vocabulary, historical trends. Detailed examination of specific African countries as case studies, such as Ghana, Nigeria, Zimbabwe, Tanzania. Credit will not be given for both HI (AFS) 476 and HI 576.

Prerequisite: 3 hours of history

GEP Global Knowledge

HI 477  Women in the Middle East  (3 credit hours)  

The varied forces influencing lives of women in Middle East from beginning of Islam to present.

Prerequisite: 3 hours of History

GEP Global Knowledge

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 478  Islam and Christianity in Sub-Saharan Africa  (3 credit hours)  

Expansion and interaction of Islam and Christianity in sub-Saharan Africa in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and their influence and impact on the economy, politics, and society. Topics include missionary activity, resistance to imperial authority, the role of the churches, and the influence of religion on leadership, education, nationalism, and post-colonialism. Credit will not be given for both HI 478 and HI 578.

Prerequisite: 3 hours of History

GEP Global Knowledge

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 479/AFS 479/HI 579/AFS 579  Africa (sub-Saharan) in the Twentieth Century  (3 credit hours)  

Developments in sub-Saharan Africa during the colonial period, from the end of the nineteenth century to the advent of decolonization in the early 1960s. Interplay of political, social, economic and cultural factors in the experiences of African peoples during this period. Credit will not be given for both HI (AFS) 479 and HI 579

Prerequisite: 3 hours of History

GEP Global Knowledge

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 481/HI 581  History of the Life Sciences  (3 credit hours)  

Historical context of the individuals, ideas, scientific practices, and social goals that created the core concepts of the modern biological sciences, from Renaissance medicine to molecular biology, with a focus on interconnections of the scientific knowledge and perspective of the life sciences with other aspects of culture, including other sciences, views about nature and life, religious belief, medical practice, and agriculture. Topics include the development of biological experiments; theories of ecology and evolution; the chemical understanding of health, food, and drugs; and the modern molecular revolution. Credit will not be given for both HI 481 and HI 581.

P: 3 hrs. of History

GEP Interdisciplinary Perspectives

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 482/HI 582  Darwinism in Science and Society  (3 credit hours)  

Scientific development of Darwinism and its reception by the scientific community and the general public. Social impact of theories of evolution as reflected in Social Darwinism, eugenics, sociobiology, and relationship of sciences to ethics and religion. Credit will not be given both for HI 482 and HI 582

P: 3 hrs. of History

GEP Interdisciplinary Perspectives

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 483/HI 583  Science and Religion in European History  (3 credit hours)  

Are science and religion inherently in conflict with each other? Historical analysis of the idea of the ¨warfare between religion and science,¨ treating their complex relationship and respective cultural authority before 1800, including the relationship of science and religion in Europe during periods of the Reformation, the creation of early modern states, and the Enlightenment of the 1700s. Topics include visions of nature and utopias, the creation of mechanistic science in the 1600s, and natural theology. Credit will not be given for both HI 483 and HI 583.

P: 3 hrs. of History

GEP Global Knowledge, GEP Interdisciplinary Perspectives

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 484/HI 584  Science in European Culture  (3 credit hours)  

The role of science in shaping early modern European identity, culture and polity in the 1600s and 1700s. Drawing on documents and material culture, topics include the meaning of natural wonders, explorations, travel literature, instruments and mapping, colonies and empire, and universal expos. Credit will not be given for both HI 484 and HI 584.

P: 3 hrs. of History

GEP Global Knowledge, GEP Interdisciplinary Perspectives

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 485/HI 585  History of American Technology  (3 credit hours)  

Technology in American history: the ideological, social, economic, and institutional contexts of technological change from the 1760's to the present. Impacts of new technological systems. Credit will not be given for both HI 485 and HI 585.

Prerequisite: 3 hours of History

GEP Interdisciplinary Perspectives

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 486/HI 586  Science and Empire  (3 credit hours)  

The development of European science in the context of world exploration, global commercial expansion, local knowledge, and visions of colonization and empire. Credit will not be given for both HI 486 and HI 586.

Prerequisite: 3 hours of History

GEP Global Knowledge, GEP Humanities

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 488/HI 588  Family and Community History  (3 credit hours)  

Theory and research in family history, local history, and community studies, as well as application to public history presentation and community development. Students cannot receive credit for both HI 488 and HI 588.

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 491  Seminar in History  (3 credit hours)  

Detailed investigation of selected topics in history. Consult Department of History for specific topics.

Prerequisite:HI 300 and 18 hours of History

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

HI 495  Honors Research in History I  (2 credit hours)  

Preparation of the honors thesis. Topics and procedures to be determined by the student and the supervising faculty member. Individualized/Independent Study and Research courses require a Course Agreement for Students Enrolled in Non-Standard Courses be

Prerequisite: Senior in History Honors Program

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

HI 496  Honors Research in History II  (4 credit hours)  

Completion of the honors thesis. Topics and procedures to be determined by the student and the supervising faculty member. Individualized/Independent Study and Research courses require a Course Agreement for Students Enrolled in Non-Standard Courses be

Prerequisite: HI 495, Senior in History Honors Program

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

HI 498  Independent Study in History  (1-6 credit hours)  

Extensive readings on predetermined topics focused around a central theme. Permission of the department is required. Individualized/Independent Study and Research courses require a ""Course Agreement for Students Enrolled in Non-Standard Courses"" be c

Prerequisite: 3 hours of History

HI 499  Special Topics in History  (1-3 credit hours)  

Timely topical courses or experimental course offerings in advanced historical study.

Prerequisite: 3 hours of History

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

HI 500/HI 400  Civilization of the Ancient Near East  (3 credit hours)  

The civilization of Mesopotamia and Egypt from earliest times to the fall of Babylon in 539 B.C. Credit for both HI 400 and HI 500 is not allowed

Prerequisite: 3 hours of History

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 502/REL 502  Early Christianity to the Time of Eusebius  (3 credit hours)  

Growth and diffusion of early Christianity from the end of the first century up to the time of Eusebius and the conversion of Constantine (early fourth century); Christianity in its Greco-Roman environment; Roman policy towards Christianity; heterodox C

Prerequisite: Graduate standing

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 503/HI 403  Ancient Greek Civilization  (3 credit hours)  

The history of the Hellenes from the Minoan civilization through Alexander's legacy, with readings in Herodotus and Thucydides. Credit will not be given for both HI 403 and HI 503.

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 504/HI 404  Rome to 337 A.D.  (3 credit hours)  

The development of ancient Rome from its origins in Italy, through the rise as an Empire embracing the entire Mediterranean World and Western Europe, to Constantine, Christianity and the foundation of Constantinople. Examines critically the political achievement of a people who rose from an obscure Italian city to a world empire, with emphasis on the analysis of primary sources. Credit will not be given for both HI 404 and HI 504

P: 3 hrs. of History

HI 505/HI 405  History and Archaeology of the Roman Empire  (3 credit hours)  

Analysis of Rome's rule over the Mediterranean World in the first four centuries A.D. through the use of literary and archaelologic sources. Special emphasis on imperial army and frontier security. Credit will not be given for both H1 405 and H1 505

P: 3 hrs. of History

HI 506/HI 406  From Roman Empire to Middle Ages  (3 credit hours)  

Late Antiquity and the early Middle Ages. The transition from classical civilization to the basis of modern civilizations; the fall of Rome, the Germanic kingdoms, Byzantium, the establishment of Christianity, the birth and growth of Islam. Credit will not be given for both HI 406 and HI 506

P: 3 hrs. of History

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 507/REL 507  Islamic History to 1798  (3 credit hours)  

The history of the Islamic Near East to 1798. Topics include the East Mediterranean before Islam, Muhammad and the development of Islam, sources of Muslim civilization, Islamic law, science, philosophy, art and architecture, Islam in Spain, India, Asia and Africa, the Crusades, the Ottomans, Islam and Europe. Credit will not be given for both REL/HI 407 and REL/HI 507.

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 508/REL 508  Islam in the Modern World  (3 credit hours)  

Evolution of modern Islam from 17th century to the present. Primary emphasis on North Africa, the Middle East and South Asia. Pre-modern Islamicate empires, reform and revival. Historical origins of current issues in the Islamic world. Students cannot receive credit for both REL/HI 408 and REL/HI 508.

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 509/HI 409  The High Middle Ages  (3 credit hours)  

Medieval culture from 10th through 13th centuries: revival of the Roman Empire, monastic and papal reform, rise of universities, evolution of representative bodies, the Gothic style, troubadour and goliardic poetry, scholasticism, and revival of Roman law. Credit will not be given for both HI 409 and HI 509

P: 3 hrs. of History

HI 511/HI 411  Trials of Faith: Religious Reformation in Early-Modern Europe  (3 credit hours)  

Examination of the great disruption in European civilization associated with the Protestant and Catholic Reformations. The course considers the new religious ideas and practices associated with the Reformations and transformation they produced in European political and economic life; the violence they provoked; the new thinking about families and gender roles they encouraged, the spread of European religions around the globe with European voyages of discovery and conquest, and the beginning of ideas about religious toleration. Credit will not be given for both HI 411 and HI 511.

P: 3 hrs. of History

GEP Global Knowledge

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 512/HI 412  The Sexes and Society in Early-Modern Europe  (3 credit hours)  

Examination of changes in gender relations; ideas about the sexes, femininity, and masculinity; the roles of women and men in political, religious, economic, scientific, and family life in Europe between the late Middle Ages and the French Revolution. Credit for HI 412 and HI 512 is not allowed.

P: 3 hrs. of History

GEP Global Knowledge

HI 514/HI 414  From Kings to Revolution: The History of Early-Modern France  (3 credit hours)  

Examination of the most politically powerful and culturally dominant kingdom in early-modern Europe, which dissolved into a revolution that destroyed its monarchy while establishing ideas about democracy and equality. From the glories of the Versailles palace to the misery of peasant villages, topics include the beginnings of the French state and nation in the warfare and religious conflicts of 1500s, political and economic developments, the growth of an internationally influential French culture, religious change, controversies over gender roles, and the origins of the French Revolution. Credit will not be given for both HI 414 and HI 514.

P: 3 hrs. of History

GEP Global Knowledge

HI 515/HI 415  The French Revolution  (3 credit hours)  

Broadly based analysis of France's first revolutionary era; the enlightenment and its impact, the causes and character of the Revolution in France; impact of these events in France and Europe. Credit will not be given for both HI 415 and HI 515

P: 3 hrs. of History

GEP Global Knowledge

HI 518/HI 418  Fascist Italy and Nazi Germany  (3 credit hours)  

Fascism as a theoretical concept, rise of fascism in Italy and Germany, seizure of power by Mussolini and Hitler, organization of the economy, churches, military, women, youth, and culture under the dictatorships. Students will not receive credit for both HI 418 and HI 518

P: 3 hrs. of History

GEP Global Knowledge

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 519/HI 419  Modern European Imperialism  (3 credit hours)  

Historical background of European overseas expansion; its impact on the economics, politics and culture of both Europe and the colonized world; the significance of imperialism and anti-colonial nationalism in shaping the modern world. Credit will not be given for both HI 419 and HI 519

P: 3 hrs. of History

GEP Global Knowledge

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 521/HI 421  European Intellectual History: The Eighteenth Century  (3 credit hours)  

Historical examination of some of the major figures of the European Enlightenment, beginning with Locke and ending with Kant. Credit will not be given for both HI 421 and HI 521

P: 3 hrs. of History

GEP Global Knowledge

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 522/HI 422  European Intellectual History: The 19th Century  (3 credit hours)  

Historical examination of some of the major figures of European thought during the 19th century, beginning with the enthusiasm of the period of the French Revolution and ending with the disillusionment of the fin de siecle. Credit will not be given for both HI 422 and HI 522

P: 3 hrs. of History

GEP Global Knowledge

HI 523/HI 423  Women in European Enlightenment  (3 credit hours)  

Historical analysis of feminist thought and action during the Enlightenment of the 1700s. Topics include women's role in the development of Western knowledge and science, historical construction of the gendered "nature" of women, education and political resources available to women, and their strategies for emancipation. Credit will not be given for both HI 423 and HI 523.

P: 3 hrs. of History

GEP Global Knowledge

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 525/HI 425  Tudor and Stuart England  (3 credit hours)  

British history from the Reformation through the Civil War. Emphasis on key developments in social, political and economic life: The development of a new concept of kingship, the growing independence of Parliament, the search for religious uniformity and the changing status of the aristocracy and gentry. Credit will not be given for both HI 425 and HI 525

P: 3 hrs. of History

GEP Global Knowledge

HI 530/HI 430  Modern France  (3 credit hours)  

French history from the downfall of Napoleon I to the present, with a short introductory survey of the Old Regime and the French Revolution. Cultural, social and economic developments and political trends. Credit will not be given for both HI 430 and HI 530

P: 3 hrs. of History

GEP Global Knowledge

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 533  Theory and Practice of Oral History  (3 credit hours)  

Explores the practice of oral history. Examines historical works drawn primarily from oral sources. Teaches students to design and implement oral history projects based on independent research.

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 534/HI 434  Theory and Practice of Digital History  (3 credit hours)  

Introduces students to the theory and practice of digital history. Students will examine theoretical scholarship on digital practices in history, learning how to acquire, edit, process, analyze, and present humanistic data. Students will critique examples of digital history including digital archives, exhibits, scholarship, and teaching resources, and then apply conceptual knowledge in the creation of their own digital history projects. The course is geared to students without prior knowledge of coding. Credit will not be given for both HI 434 and HI 534.

R: Graduate Standing or PBS

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 535  Spatial History  (3 credit hours)  

Introduces students to the methods, problems, and questions of spatial history. Students will examine major works in spatial history and historical geography, and develop their own projects utilizing the tools of historical GIS. Students will engage in theoretical discussions about the role of space in history and, at the same time, will acquire the skills for collecting, managing, and analyzing historical spatial data. The course is geared to students without prior knowledge of GIS. Graduate standing or PBS status.

R: Graduate Standing or PBS

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 539  History Of the Soviet Union and After  (3 credit hours)  

History of the Soviet state and society from the 1917 Revolution, including post-Soviet situation. Political disarray and resistance to the Bolshevik regime, 1917-21; industrialization, urbanization and application of coercive techniques of rule; popular reconciliation with Party state and great power status during World War II and after; fate of non-Russian nationalities; de-Stalinization, stagnation and failed attempt at Party renewal after 1985. Credit for both HI 439 and HI 539 is not allowed

HI 540/HI 440  American Environmental History  (3 credit hours)  

Interactions between humans and their environments in America; environmental focus on themes in American history such as colonial settlement, industrialization, progressivism, the New Deal, the 1960s. Credit will not be given for both HI 440 and HI 540.

Prerequisite: 3 hours of History

GEP Interdisciplinary Perspectives

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 541/HI 441  Colonial and Revolutionary U.S  (3 credit hours)  

Origins of the English colonies in America to the American Revolution. European background to colonization, merging of different cultures, effects of mercantile doctrine, causes of revolution. Credit will not be given for both HI 441 and HI 541

P: 3 Hours of History

HI 543/HI 443  U.S. Constitutional History to 1883  (3 credit hours)  

This course examines the origins and development of the U. S. Constitution from the Articles of Confederation to 1883. The course specifically looks at the federal Convention of 1787, the national bank debate and early constitutional interpretation;the constitution and its interaction with politics, economics, and society; the powers of Congress-taxation, contracts, commerce and war. The course also examines sovereignty, slavery and civil rights. It ends with an analysis of the Civil War Amendments and the transformation in American constitutionalism. Credit for both HI 443 and HI 543 is not allowed

P: 3 hrs. of History

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 544  US Constitutional History Since 1870  (3 credit hours)  

Examines the transformation of American constitutional thought after the Civil War; the triumph of nationalism and the evolution of a new federal theory; the rise and fall of federal protections of civil rights. Explores key concepts such as civil liberties, judicial activism and judicial restraint; analyzes procedural and substantive due process, liberty of contracts and entrepreneurial liberty; evaluates Japanese internment, privacy, gender equality, free speech, religious freedom, civil liberties. credit not given for both HI 444 and 544

Prerequisite: Graduate standing

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 545/HI 445  Early American Borderlands  (3 credit hours)  

Examines the social, political, and cultural development of the eastern American frontiers between the early seventeenth and mid-nineteenth centuries. Addresses the relationships between settlers and environments, settlers and Native Americans. Explores the structure and life of pioneer families, the development of new institutions, the role of governments in regulating settlements, and the evolution of the "frontier myth." Credit cannot be given for both HI 445 and HI 545.

P: 3 hrs. of History

GEP Humanities, GEP U.S. Diversity

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 546/HI 446  Topics in Civil War and Reconstruction  (3 credit hours)  

Examination of the historiography of the American Civil War and Reconstruction. Topics include the origins of the war, military strategy, the northern and southern homefront, nationalism and citizenship, slavery and freed labor, changing gender roles and ideologies, struggles over racial inequality, and conservatism and radicalism during Reconstruction. Credit will not be given for both HI 446 and HI 546.

Prerequisite: 3 hrs. of History

GEP Humanities, GEP U.S. Diversity

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 547/WGS 547/HI 447/WGS 447  Women in America: From Contact to the Civil War  (3 credit hours)  

The historical experience of women in America from Native American and European contact through the colonial period to the immediate post-Civil-War years (to 1890). Topics include the history of women's work, education, legal and political status, religious experience, and sex roles, with consideration of age, class, race, sexual preference, and region as significant variables in women's experience in America. Credit will not be given for both HI (WGS) 447 and HI (WGS) 547.

P: 3 Hours of History

GEP Humanities, GEP U.S. Diversity

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 548/WGS 548/HI 448/WGS 448  American Women in the Twentieth Century  (3 credit hours)  

Women's historical experience in America, 1890-1990. Changes in women's work, education, legal and political status, and sex roles, age, class, race, sexual preference and region as significant variables in women's experience. Credit will not be given for both HI (WGS) 448 and HI (WGS) 548.

P: 3 hrs. of History

GEP Humanities, GEP U.S. Diversity

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 549/HI 449  U.S. Labor to 1900  (3 credit hours)  

This course explores the history of work, workers, and working-class life and labor in the United States from the founding of the first European colonies to the beginning of the twentieth century: bound and free labor in colonial America, the transformation of urban worklife in the decades preceding the Civil War, slavery and class formation in the antebellum South, the effects of immigration on American workers, and the impact of race and gender on workers' solidarity. Credit will not be given for both HI 449 and HI 549.

P: 3 hrs. of History

GEP U.S. Diversity

HI 550  U. S. Labor Since 1900  (3 credit hours)  

This course explores the history of work, workers, and working class organizations in the twentieth century United States; with particular attention to three core issues in twentieth-century American labor history: whether the US South has a particular form of labor history; the historical struggle for workers¨ rights to collectively act and protest; and the intersections between race, ethnicity, immigration and labor in the twentieth-century US. Credit for both HI 450 and HI 550 is not allowed.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing

HI 551/HI 451  The Vietnam War  (3 credit hours)  

The Vietnam War in Vietnamese historical context. A study of major works on the legacy of French colonialism; the growth of Vietnamese radicalism and communism; World War II and the Vietnamese Revolution; the French Indochina War and political division

Prerequisite: 3 hours of History

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 552/HI 452  Recent America  (3 credit hours)  

Examination of contemporary opinions and historical interpretations of major problems in American life since 1939, including World War II, its social and economic consequences; Korea and the Cold War, big business and labor; civil rights and feminist movements; countercultures, Vietnam and Watergate. Credit will not be given both for HI 452 and HI 552

P: 3 Hours of History

HI 553/HI 453  United States-Latin American Relations Since 1823  (3 credit hours)  

Critical analysis of the last two centuries of relations between the US and Latin America. Exploration of major policies using primary sources and declassified CIA documents. Major themes include US economic, political, and military influence, covert and overt US interventions, and response by Latin American governments. Historical perspectives on contemporary inter-American problems such as drugs, environment, debt crisis, human rights abuses, and the impact of the Latino population in the U.S. Credit will not be given both for HI 453 and HI 553.

Prerequisite: 3 hrs. of History

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 554  History Of U. S. Foreign Relations, 1900-Present  (3 credit hours)  

American diplomatic history since 1900; the expansion of American economic and cultural relations; the evolution of the American foreign policy bureaucracy; and the historical forces and personalities that shaped American relations with other nations. C

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 555/AFS 555/HI 455/AFS 455  History of the Civil Rights Movement  (3 credit hours)  

The black revolution; stages and leaders of the movement; successes and failures in the fight for desegregation, the vote, and economic opportunity; impact of Civil Rights movement on the United States. Credit will not be given both for AFS/HI 455 and AFS/HI 555.

P: 3 hrs. of History

GEP Humanities, GEP U.S. Diversity

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 559/HI 459  The Early American Republic  (3 credit hours)  

Examines the social, political, and cultural development of the Early Republic, the period in American history roughly from the Revolutionary War through the Administration of John Quincy Adams. Employs the life of Thomas Jefferson-the quintessential American, as the foundation for delving into the historical problems, interpreting primary sources, and analyzing secondary sources. Encourages graduate students to analyze the ways in which historiographic debates complicate our understanding of the Early American Republic. Credit will not be given for both HI 459 and HI 559.

Prerequisite: 3 hrs. of History

HI 561/HI 461  Civilization of the Old South  (3 credit hours)  

The distinctive features of the Old South as part of the regional development of United States history. Consideration of colonial factors in the making of the South, development of the plantation system and slavery, Southern social order, intellectual and cultural life, economic development, and rise of Southern nationalism. Credit will not be given for both HI 461 and HI 561

Prerequisite: 3 hrs. of History

HI 562/HI 462  Southern History since the Civil War  (3 credit hours)  

Exploration of many American "Souths" from Reconstruction to the present. How race/ethnicity, gender, class, geography, sexuality, and culture inform "Southern" identity; major political and economic changes; and the region's relationship to the nation and the world. Credit will not be given for HI 462 and HI 562.

Prerequisite: 3 hours of History

GEP Humanities, GEP U.S. Diversity

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

HI 563/HI 463  Topics in History and Memory  (3 credit hours)  

Explores how "collective memory" develops. Examines how memory is represented through public speeches, civic celebrations, monuments and memorials, and other forms of popular and political culture. Analyzes what is recalled, what is forgotten, and who decides. Asks why memory is made public. May be repeated once for credit when offered with a different topic. Credit will not be given for both HI 463 and HI 563.

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

HI 566  Readings in Native American History  (3 credit hours)  

Readings in the varied historical experiences of nations native to North America from the first migrations of peoples into the continent until the present, including the variety and diversity of native cultures and experiences; native resistance to colonialism, expansion, and U.S. federal policies; and the survival and continuity of native cultures and peoples through more than four centuries of contact, conquest, and change.

HI 568/HI 468  Slavery in the Americas  (3 credit hours)  

Exploration of the development of chattel slavery throughout the Americas. Analysis of the emergence and development of New World slavery in ways that encourage students to think critically about the historical processes of abolition, emancipation, and freedom across the Atlantic world. The lectures and readings seek to dislodge the notion that the "history of slavery" only pertains to the United States. The course, instead, emphasizes commonalities and differences in ways that challenge assumptions that the institution was exceptional in any given region. Credit will not be given for both HI 468 and HI 568.

Prerequisite: 3 Hours of History and Junior Standing

GEP Global Knowledge

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 569/HI 469  Latin American Revolutions in the Twentieth Century  (3 credit hours)  

Comparative analysis of causes, participants, process, and outcome of revolutions in Mexico, Bolivia, Cuba, and Central America. Credit for both HI 469 and HI 569 will not be given

P: 3 hrs. of History

GEP Global Knowledge

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 570/HI 470  Exploring World History  (3 credit hours)  

Introduction to the methods, themes, and narratives of world history. As a distinct approach to historical study, world history focuses on dynamic connections and relationships among regions of the world and the variety of global processes - related to trade, religion, production, consumption, migration, imperialism, disease, and technologies - that connected them. The course is a suggested elective for future teachers who will teach world history in high school, as well as an ideal course for History majors and graduate students who want to explore the connections among all the regionally specific upper division courses they have taken. Credit will not be given for both HI 470 and HI 570.

Prerequisite: 3 hours of History

GEP Global Knowledge

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 571/HI 471  Revolutionary China  (3 credit hours)  

China 1900 to present. Examination of political, cultural, and socio-economic revolutionary phases of China's 20th-century transformation from traditional empire to communism. Particular attention to post-1949 problems of nation-building. Credit will not be given for both HI 471 and HI 571

P: 3 hrs. of History

GEP Global Knowledge

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 572  The Rise of Modern Japan, 1850-Present  (3 credit hours)  

Japan's emergence as a modern nation and world power. Topics include nation-state formation; modernization and its dislocations; democratization and authoritarianism; imperialism, international politics, and war; postwar reforms; changing gender relations; popular culture; and social problems. Credit will not be given for both HI 472 and HI 572

Prerequisite: Graduate standing

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 573/HI 473  Japan's Empire in Asia, 1868-1945  (3 credit hours)  

An advanced survey of Japanese relations with Asia in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Structures and ideologies of imperialism and colonialism; modernization, nationalism and social change; migration and mobility; resistance and collaboration; and legacies of empire. Credit will not be given for both HI 473 and HI 573

P: 3 hrs. of History

GEP Global Knowledge

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 575/AFS 575/HI 475/AFS 475  History of the Republic of South Africa  (3 credit hours)  

Evolution of the Republic of South Africa's society, with emphasis on the interaction of diverse peoples and cultures. Particular attention is given to the period since 1870. Credit will not be given for both HI (AFS) 475 and HI 575.

Prerequisite: 3 hours of History

GEP Global Knowledge

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

HI 576/AFS 576/HI 476/AFS 476  Leadership in Modern Africa  (3 credit hours)  

Recent sub-Saharan African political history (excluding South Africa). Overview of concepts, vocabulary, historical trends. Detailed examination of specific African countries as case studies, such as Ghana, Nigeria, Zimbabwe, Tanzania. Credit will not be given for both HI (AFS) 476 and HI 576.

Prerequisite: 3 hours of history

GEP Global Knowledge

HI 578  Islam and Christianity in Sub-Saharan Africa since the 19th Century  (3 credit hours)  

Expansion and interaction of Islam and Christianity in sub-Saharan Africa in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and their influence and impact on the economy, politics, and society. Topics include missionary activity, resistance to imperial authority, the role of the churches, and the influence of religion on leadership, education, nationalism, and post-colonialism. Credit will not be given for both HI 478 and HI 578; graduate standing for HI 578.

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 579/AFS 579/HI 479/AFS 479  Africa (sub-Saharan) in the Twentieth Century  (3 credit hours)  

Developments in sub-Saharan Africa during the colonial period, from the end of the nineteenth century to the advent of decolonization in the early 1960s. Interplay of political, social, economic and cultural factors in the experiences of African peoples during this period. Credit will not be given for both HI (AFS) 479 and HI 579

Prerequisite: 3 hours of History

GEP Global Knowledge

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 581/HI 481  History of the Life Sciences  (3 credit hours)  

Historical context of the individuals, ideas, scientific practices, and social goals that created the core concepts of the modern biological sciences, from Renaissance medicine to molecular biology, with a focus on interconnections of the scientific knowledge and perspective of the life sciences with other aspects of culture, including other sciences, views about nature and life, religious belief, medical practice, and agriculture. Topics include the development of biological experiments; theories of ecology and evolution; the chemical understanding of health, food, and drugs; and the modern molecular revolution. Credit will not be given for both HI 481 and HI 581.

P: 3 hrs. of History

GEP Interdisciplinary Perspectives

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 582/HI 482  Darwinism in Science and Society  (3 credit hours)  

Scientific development of Darwinism and its reception by the scientific community and the general public. Social impact of theories of evolution as reflected in Social Darwinism, eugenics, sociobiology, and relationship of sciences to ethics and religion. Credit will not be given both for HI 482 and HI 582

P: 3 hrs. of History

GEP Interdisciplinary Perspectives

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 583/HI 483  Science and Religion in European History  (3 credit hours)  

Are science and religion inherently in conflict with each other? Historical analysis of the idea of the ¨warfare between religion and science,¨ treating their complex relationship and respective cultural authority before 1800, including the relationship of science and religion in Europe during periods of the Reformation, the creation of early modern states, and the Enlightenment of the 1700s. Topics include visions of nature and utopias, the creation of mechanistic science in the 1600s, and natural theology. Credit will not be given for both HI 483 and HI 583.

P: 3 hrs. of History

GEP Global Knowledge, GEP Interdisciplinary Perspectives

HI 584/HI 484  Science in European Culture  (3 credit hours)  

The role of science in shaping early modern European identity, culture and polity in the 1600s and 1700s. Drawing on documents and material culture, topics include the meaning of natural wonders, explorations, travel literature, instruments and mapping, colonies and empire, and universal expos. Credit will not be given for both HI 484 and HI 584.

P: 3 hrs. of History

GEP Global Knowledge, GEP Interdisciplinary Perspectives

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 585/HI 485  History of American Technology  (3 credit hours)  

Technology in American history: the ideological, social, economic, and institutional contexts of technological change from the 1760's to the present. Impacts of new technological systems. Credit will not be given for both HI 485 and HI 585.

Prerequisite: 3 hours of History

GEP Interdisciplinary Perspectives

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

HI 586/HI 486  Science and Empire  (3 credit hours)  

The development of European science in the context of world exploration, global commercial expansion, local knowledge, and visions of colonization and empire. Credit will not be given for both HI 486 and HI 586.

Prerequisite: 3 hours of History

GEP Global Knowledge, GEP Humanities

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 587/ANT 587  Cultural Resource Management  (3 credit hours)  

Theoretical and practical overview of U.S. federal and state laws, institutions, and practices related to the inventory, evaluation, preservation, protection, and overall management of cultural resources; history and philosophical bases of Cultural Resource Management (CRM); professional ethics; indigenous and other stakeholder interests in CRM; and comparative national regulations outside the U.S. and the international heritage management and organizations. Graduate standing in history required.

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 588/HI 488  Family and Community History  (3 credit hours)  

Theory and research in family history, local history, and community studies, as well as application to public history presentation and community development. Students cannot receive credit for both HI 488 and HI 588.

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 589  Interpretation in Historic Sites and Parks  (3 credit hours)  

Methodologies of interpreting history at historic sites and parks; training in interpretive tools linking historiography and research methodology with real places for presentation to the public; considerations of practical application. Five day trips r

Requisite: NCSU Graduate Students (MR or DR), NDS Students Only

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 591  Museum Studies  (3 credit hours)  

Organization and operation of museums as historical agencies. Role of museums in historical research and education. Graduate standing or NDS.

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 593  Material Culture  (3 credit hours)  

Current theories of material culture analysis and their application to history museums. Graduate standing or NDS.

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 594  Cultural Heritage  (3 credit hours)  

Use of the past and its cultures in reinforcing identities. Global development of heritage preservation, cultural resource management, and heritage tourism. Role of heritage professionals in identification, study, assessment, preservation, interpretation, management, and promotion of historic and cultural resources. Law and regulations that protect and preserve cultural resources. Graduate standing or NDS.

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 595  Special Topics in History  (1-6 credit hours)  

Topical courses or experimental course offerings in advanced historical study.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

HI 596  Introduction To Public History  (3 credit hours)  

Historical origins of public history, applications of history to public life, historiography and major paradigms in the field, and debates about the public role of historians. Graduate standing in History.

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 597  Historiography and Historical Method  (3 credit hours)  

Major steps in development of historical investigation; analysis of elements of historical research; discussion of methodology and archival materials used by contemporary scholarly historian.

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 598  Historical Writing  (3 credit hours)  

Critical studies in the methods and practice of contemporary historical writing.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or PBS status

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 599  Independent Study  (1-3 credit hours)  

Individualized study conducted under supervision of graduate faculty. Course of study, assigned readings, course projects or papers, and methods of evaluating work to be detailed in writing and approved by department head.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or PBS status

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

HI 642  Internship In Public History  (3 credit hours)  

Supervised internship experience with a public or private historical agency or institution or local, regional, or national significance. Graduate standing in History.

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

HI 685  Master's Supervised Teaching  (1-3 credit hours)  

Teaching experience under the mentorship of faculty who assist the student in planning for the teaching assignment, observe and provide feedback to the student during the teaching assignment, and evaluate the student upon completion of the assignment.

Prerequisite: Master's student

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 693  Master's Supervised Research  (1-9 credit hours)  

Instruction in research and research under the mentorship of a member of the Graduate Faculty.

Prerequisite: Master's student

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

HI 695  Master's Thesis Research  (1-9 credit hours)  

Thesis Research

Prerequisite: Master's student

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

HI 696  Summer Thesis Research  (1 credit hours)  

For graduate students whose programs of work specify no formal course work during a summer session and who will be devoting full time to thesis research.

Prerequisite: Master's student

Typically offered in Summer only

HI 699  Master's Thesis Preparation  (1-9 credit hours)  

For students who have completed all credit hour requirements and full-time enrollment for the master's degree and are writing and defending their thesis. Credits Arranged

Prerequisite: Master's student

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

HI 787  African American Public History  (3 credit hours)  

Issues in public history practice as they relate to the collection, preservation, and interpretation of African American cultural history. Graduate standing in history required.

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 788  Native American Public History  (3 credit hours)  

Issues in public history practice as they relate to the collection, preservation, and interpretation of Native American history. Graduate standing in history required.

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 789  Public History in International Context  (3 credit hours)  

Global public history since 1945, including functions of historical memory as they relate to global economics of public history, world heritage, and the transnational contexts for the work of historians.

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 791  Colloquium in Public History  (3 credit hours)  

Advanced historiographical readings on major topics in public history. Graduate standing only.

Typically offered in Spring only

HI 792  Colloquium in History  (3 credit hours)  

Advanced historiographical readings on major topics in history. May be repeated for credit with different topic. Graduate standing in History only.

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

HI 795  Special Topics  (1-6 credit hours)  
HI 799  Independent Study  (1-3 credit hours)  

Independent Study

Typically offered in Fall only

HI 885  Doctoral Supervised Teaching  (1-3 credit hours)  
HI 889  Doctoral Dissertation Seminar  (1 credit hours)  

Development of a solid dissertation structure, research strategy and drafting of framing chapters, preparation of dissertation proposal and proposal presentation, strategies for revision of dissertation. Three consecutive semesters beginning in semester of exams. Graduate standing in history only.

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

HI 895  Doctoral Dissertation Research  (1-9 credit hours)  
HI 896  Summer Dissert Res  (1 credit hours)  
HI 899  Doctoral Dissertation Preparation  (1-3 credit hours)