Women's and Gender Studies (WGS)

WGS 200  Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies  (3 credit hours)  

Introduction to women's and gender studies as an interdisciplinary field spanning the humanities, social sciences and natural sciences. Study of historical perspectives and contemporary understanding of women and gender. Theory, systematic analysis and experimental accounts used to explore complexities of gender, and other identity determinants, mechanisms of power and privilege, and avenues for social change.

GEP U.S. Diversity

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

WGS 204/SOC 204  Sociology of Family  (3 credit hours)  

Contemporary American family structures and processes and their development. Focus on socialization, mate selection, marital adjustment and dissolution. Includes core sociological concepts, methods, theories.

GEP Social Sciences, GEP U.S. Diversity

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

WGS 210/STS 210  Women and Gender in Science and Technology  (3 credit hours)  

Interdisciplinary introduction to the reciprocal relationships between scientific/technological research and contemporary understanding of gender. Special emphasis on social factors influencing scientists and engineers in their professions.

GEP Interdisciplinary Perspectives, GEP U.S. Diversity

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

WGS 220  Men and Masculinity  (3 credit hours)  

An introduction to the study of men and masculinity as an interdisciplinary field spanning the humanities and social sciences. This course will draw on both historical perspectives and contemporary understanding of men and masculinity, with attention to key domains of men's lives such as the roles of men in fiction and film, race and masculinity, religion and masculinity, fatherhood, masculinity and sports, and male sexuality.

GEP U.S. Diversity

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

WGS 293  Special Topics in WGS  (3 credit hours)  

Examination of varying topics on women and/or gender from an interdisciplinary perspective at an introductory level.

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

WGS 300  Introduction to Feminist Theories  (3 credit hours)  

This course provides an overview of primarily US and western feminist theoretical perspectives by focusing on the variety of viewpoints within feminism and their specific historical roots. More than half of the course is devoted to studying specific themes and issues in women's history. The historical background lays the foundation for examining specific feminist theories, including liberal feminism, difference feminism and black feminism/womanism. The course prepares students for further work in Women's and Gender Studies, including WGS 492.

Prerequisite: WGS 200

Typically offered in Fall only

WGS 304/SOC 304  Gender and Society  (3 credit hours)  

A sociological analysis of women and men in contemporary American society. Perpetuation of and change in gender stratification using sociological concepts, theories, and research. How gender expectations developed and transmitted. Historical data and research on diversity in American society used for analysis of causes and consequences of gender inequality.

P: 3 credits in SOC at the 200-level

GEP Social Sciences, GEP U.S. Diversity

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

WGS 305/ENG 305  Women and Literature  (3 credit hours)  

Nineteenth through twenty-first century women's literature, as shaped by the intersecting and competing claims of gender, race, sexuality, and culture. Focus on fiction, accompanied by critical readings from American studies, feminist literary criticism, and postmodern theory.

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and above

GEP Humanities, GEP U.S. Diversity

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

WGS 306/PS 306  Gender and Politics in the United States  (3 credit hours)  

This course explores the role of gender in contemporary American politics. The course examines the historical course of gender politics to see how we have arrived at the present state. It investigates the activities that women and men play in modern politics-voting, running for office, serving in office, etc., and how women and men perform these activities in different ways. The course also focuses on major areas of public policy that affect women and men in different ways.

Prerequisite: PS 201

GEP Social Sciences, GEP U.S. Diversity

Typically offered in Fall only

WGS 308/ENG 308  Contemporary Issues in Ecofeminism  (3 credit hours)  

Contemporary issues in ecofeminism provides a historical introduction to and global perspectives on women's sociopolitical, ethical, and economic contributions to the 20th and 21st century environmental movement. Theory and political action as they interweave issues of gender, race, and class in western and non-western contexts will be emphasized. Students will read works by and about female scientists/activists/writers and examine their own communities, analyzing the ways that individuals, community values, and dominant institutions impact women's relationships with the environment. Students will formulate questions, responses, and interpretations through critical reading practices, class discussion groups, self-reflective writing, and comparative analyses. Special attention will be paid to the role of literature--memoir, novel, short story, essay--in the dissemination of ecofeminist ideas.

GEP Humanities, GEP Interdisciplinary Perspectives

Typically offered in Spring only

WGS 310  Women's and Gender Studies Internship  (3 credit hours)  

Internship program. Introduction to careers that deal specifically with women's issues. Ten-hours-per-week work at a nonprofit or governmental organization. Contextualization of that experience through additional academic requirements. Individualized

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

WGS 327/ENG 327  Language and Gender  (3 credit hours)  

Introduction to the use of language by men and women. Research in Linguistics and Women's Studies addressing issues such as the acquisition of gender-differentiated language, gender and conversational interaction, sexism in language, gender issues in society, and the relationship between language, gender, and other social constructs (e.g., class, culture, and ethnicity).

Prerequisite: ENG 101

Typically offered in Fall only

WGS 330  Women and Health  (3 credit hours)  

Women and Health utilizes an interdisciplinary approach to explore historical perspectives on health, access to health technologies, health policy research, and emerging topics in women's health. The humanities, social sciences, and biological sciences inform inquiry into "hot topics" in health policy, ethics, and the medical sciences. The health of women is dissected through a lens of gender equity and domestic and international perspectives are employed. Students are encouraged to identify and study topics of their own interest.

GEP Interdisciplinary Perspectives

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

WGS 350  Emerging Issues in Women's and Gender Studies  (3 credit hours)  

Exploration of advanced specialized topics in Women's and Gender Studies, to enhance in-depth undergraduate training in specific applied theories and methods. Seminar content will rotate, with attention to contemporary theoretical currents, and their application and effectiveness in addressing important emerging issues affecting individuals' well-being in society, particularly those faced by underrepresented groups.

Prerequisites: WGS 200 or WGS 210 or STS 210

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

WGS 360/MUS 360  Women In Music  (3 credit hours)  

The role of women in music as patrons, teachers, composers, and performers, placing them within the social, economic, and political framework to which they belong. Emphasis on Western Art Music and the role of women in popular music. No previous formal training in music is required.

GEP U.S. Diversity, GEP Visual and Performing Arts

Typically offered in Spring only

WGS 362/COM 362  Communication and Gender  (3 credit hours)  

Effects of gender on the interpersonal communication process. Construction of gendered identities via communication practices. Examination of theories of gender and the role of gender in organizational, institutional, and media communication practices.

Prerequisite: Junior standing, COM 112

Typically offered in Fall only

WGS 370  Advanced Studies of Gender in Science  (3 credit hours)  

This course is designed to provide students with an in-depth view of recent research about the influence of contemporary gender relations on science and engineering. Readings address feminist theories about sex/gender, race/class/sexualities, the social construction of science, and technological innovation. Discussions will focus on scholarship that explores how, why, and when a "gender lens" brings value to understanding nature and knowledge.

Prerequisites: WGS 200 or (WGS 210 or STS 210)

GEP Interdisciplinary Perspectives

Typically offered in Spring only

WGS 380/AFS 380  Black Feminist Theory  (3 credit hours)  

Focused examination of Black feminist theory as a significant and distinct body of work. Interdisciplinary exploration of the impact of Black feminist theory on movements for social justice, the development of academic feminism generally, and the lived experience of Black women both in the United States and internationally.

Prerequisite: Any 200-level course in either WGS or AFS

GEP U.S. Diversity

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

WGS 390  Queer Theory  (3 credit hours)  

Queer Theory provides an overview of the writings, art, identity/ies, work, politics, debates, histories, bodies, intimacies, kinship, and other lived realities of the people and experiences often organized under the LGBTQIA+ umbrella. As a critical theory, queer theory examines how circulations of power, dominance, and oppression constantly re/vision what it is to be queer, queering, and queered. The course will focus on how gender, race, class, functional diversity, sexuality, work, documentation status, age, etc. impact and are impacted by queer becoming.

P: Any 3-credit 200-level WGS course.

GEP Humanities

Typically offered in Fall and Summer

WGS 393  Special Topics in Women's and Gender Studies  (3 credit hours)  

Special topics in Women's and Gender Studies at the 300 level for offering courses on an experimental basis.

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

WGS 406/PSY 406  Psychology of Gender  (3 credit hours)  

Current theory and research on perceived and actual biological, social, cognitive, personality and emotional similarities and differences of men and women throughout the lifespan. The construction and consequences of gender in our society and others. Credit will not be given for both PSY/WGS 406 and PSY/WGS 506.

Prerequisite: PSY 200 or WGS 200

GEP Social Sciences, GEP U.S. Diversity

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

WGS 407/SOC 407  Sociology of Sexualities  (3 credit hours)  

Exploration of sexuality in a social context. Relationship between sexuality, gender and power in the U.S. Historical trends in behaviors and identities: social movements and sexual issues; current behavioral trends. Some issues covered; identity, social construction, sexual meanings.

Prerequisite: 3 hours SOC 200 level, 300 level

Typically offered in Spring only

WGS 410/ENG 410  Studies in Gender and Genre  (3 credit hours)  

This course examines the ways in which women writers from diverse backgrounds have revised the literary genres to include the varied experiences of women. It will focus on a different generic area, such as poetry, fiction, drama or autobiography, depending on its instructor.

Requisite: Sophomore Standing or Above

GEP Humanities, GEP U.S. Diversity

Typically offered in Fall only

WGS 418/PS 418  Gender Law and Policies  (3 credit hours)  

Law and policy pertaining to contemporary gender issues. Examination of agenda setting, policy formation, implementation, judicial interpretation and evaluation of selected issues, such as reproductive policies, equal employment and sexual abuse.

Prerequisite: 3 hours of Political Science

GEP U.S. Diversity

Typically offered in Spring only

WGS 444/ANT 544/WGS 544/ANT 444  Cross-Cultural Perspectives on Women  (3 credit hours)  

Comparison of women in a variety of societies: western and non-western; hunting and gathering to industrialized. Cross-cultural perspective on the similarity and diversity of women's statuses and roles. Effect of gender on social position

Prerequisite: ANT 252 and one of the following: ANT 310,325,330 or 346

Typically offered in Spring only

WGS 447/HI 547/WGS 547/HI 447  Women in America: From Contact to the Civil War  (3 credit hours)  

The historical experience of women in America from Native American and European contact through the colonial period to the immediate post-Civil-War years (to 1890). Topics include the history of women's work, education, legal and political status, religious experience, and sex roles, with consideration of age, class, race, sexual preference, and region as significant variables in women's experience in America. Credit will not be given for both HI (WGS) 447 and HI (WGS) 547.

P: 3 Hours of History

GEP Humanities, GEP U.S. Diversity

Typically offered in Fall only

WGS 448/HI 548/WGS 548/HI 448  American Women in the Twentieth Century  (3 credit hours)  

Women's historical experience in America, 1890-1990. Changes in women's work, education, legal and political status, and sex roles, age, class, race, sexual preference and region as significant variables in women's experience. Credit will not be given for both HI (WGS) 448 and HI (WGS) 548.

P: 3 hrs. of History

GEP Humanities, GEP U.S. Diversity

Typically offered in Spring only

WGS 472/REL 472  Women and Religion  (3 credit hours)  

Historical, literary, and theological sources dealing with portrayals of women and women's religious experience in several religious traditions of the world through different historical periods, from ancient to modern. Impact of feminist theory on the academic study of religion; methodological issues surrounding the study of women's religious history; role of religion in shaping attitudes toward women and their status in society. Students cannot receive credit for both REL/WGS 472 and REL/WGS 572.

Prerequisite: one course in religious studies or women's and gender studies

GEP Humanities

Typically offered in Spring only

WGS 473/REL 573/WGS 573/REL 473  Religion, Gender, and Reproductive Technologies  (3 credit hours)  

Examines comparative religious ethics concerning gender marriage, parenthood, children, and the relationship of human beings to the "natural". Relates these views to new and emerging reproductive and genetic technologies. Compares the internally diverse perspectives of three major religious traditions with regard to their interpretations of these technologies. Analyzes the impact of particular uses of these technologies on the rights of women and girls. Students cannot earn credit for both REL 473 and REL 573.

Prerequisite: One 3 cr course in Philosophy (PHI) or Religious Studies (REL) or Women's and Gender Studies (WGS)

Typically offered in Fall only

WGS 492  Theoretical Issues in Women's and Gender Studies  (3 credit hours)  

Examination of feminist theory. Study of formative texts in modern feminism, drawn from various disciplines within the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences. In-depth exploration of feminist perspectives on issues of race, class, gender, sexuality, work and mothering, among others. Analysis of local and global cultural practices using feminist theoretical frameworks.

Prerequisite: WGS 200

GEP Humanities, GEP U.S. Diversity

Typically offered in Spring only

WGS 493  Special Topics in Women's and Gender Studies  (3 credit hours)  

Examination of varying topics on women and/or gender from a multidisciplinary perspective.

Typically offered in Fall only

WGS 540/ECD 540  Gender Issues In Counseling  (3 credit hours)  

Exploration of gender as primary identity and social construct. Emphasis on gender dynamics in counseling, client empowerment and preventive approaches.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or Six hrs. in ED or PSY

Typically offered in Spring and Summer

WGS 544/ANT 444/WGS 444/ANT 544  Cross-Cultural Perspectives on Women  (3 credit hours)  

Comparison of women in a variety of societies: western and non-western; hunting and gathering to industrialized. Cross-cultural perspective on the similarity and diversity of women's statuses and roles. Effect of gender on social position

Prerequisite: ANT 252 and one of the following: ANT 310,325,330 or 346

Typically offered in Spring only

WGS 547/HI 447/WGS 447/HI 547  Women in America: From Contact to the Civil War  (3 credit hours)  

The historical experience of women in America from Native American and European contact through the colonial period to the immediate post-Civil-War years (to 1890). Topics include the history of women's work, education, legal and political status, religious experience, and sex roles, with consideration of age, class, race, sexual preference, and region as significant variables in women's experience in America. Credit will not be given for both HI (WGS) 447 and HI (WGS) 547.

P: 3 Hours of History

GEP Humanities, GEP U.S. Diversity

Typically offered in Fall only

WGS 548/HI 448/WGS 448/HI 548  American Women in the Twentieth Century  (3 credit hours)  

Women's historical experience in America, 1890-1990. Changes in women's work, education, legal and political status, and sex roles, age, class, race, sexual preference and region as significant variables in women's experience. Credit will not be given for both HI (WGS) 448 and HI (WGS) 548.

P: 3 hrs. of History

GEP Humanities, GEP U.S. Diversity

Typically offered in Spring only

WGS 572/REL 572  Women and Religion  (3 credit hours)  

Historical, literary, and theological sources dealing with portrayals of women and women's religious experience in several religious traditions of the world through different historical periods, from ancient to modern. Impact of feminist theory on the academic study of religion; methodological issues surrounding the study of women's religious history; role of religion in shaping attitudes toward women and their status in society. Students cannot receive credit for both REL/WGS 472 and REL/WGS 572.

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

Typically offered in Spring only

WGS 573/REL 473/WGS 473/REL 573  Religion, Gender, and Reproductive Technologies  (3 credit hours)  

Examines comparative religious ethics concerning gender marriage, parenthood, children, and the relationship of human beings to the "natural". Relates these views to new and emerging reproductive and genetic technologies. Compares the internally diverse perspectives of three major religious traditions with regard to their interpretations of these technologies. Analyzes the impact of particular uses of these technologies on the rights of women and girls. Students cannot earn credit for both REL 473 and REL 573.

Prerequisite: One 3 cr course in Philosophy (PHI) or Religious Studies (REL) or Women's and Gender Studies (WGS)

Typically offered in Fall only

WGS 593  Special Topics  (1-6 credit hours)  

Examination of a core topic on women and/or gender from an interdisciplinary perspective at the graduate level.

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

WGS 633  Independent Study  (1-3 credit hours)  

Typically offered in Summer only

WGS 706/PSY 706  Psychology of Gender  (3 credit hours)  

Current theory and research on perceived and actual biological, social, cognitive, personality, and emotional similarities and differences of men and women throughout lifespan. Construction and consequences of gender in our society and others.

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

WGS 737/SOC 737  Sociology Of Gender  (3 credit hours)  

Theories about the development and maintenance of gender. Historical development of gender stratification. How individuals ""do gender"" in their daily lives. Contemporary research and substantive readings about gender in public and intimate relation

Prerequisite: Graduate student, SOC 736 or 731

Typically offered in Fall only

WGS 739/SOC 739  Social Psychology Of Inequality  (3 credit hours)  

The effects of race, class and gender inequality on the formation of group consciousness, self-evaluations, emotions, values, attitudes and beliefs. Attention to interpersonal processes through to reproduction of inequality in everyday life.

Requisite: Admission to SOC Graduate Program

Typically offered in Spring only