Animal Science (ANS)

ANS 101  Introduction to Livestock and Poultry Industries  (3 credit hours)  

General introduction to nutrition, reproduction, breeding, management and description of marketing channels of animals and poultry. Equates live animal and carcass characteristics with market specifications. Factors of pre- and post-slaughter treatment are related to the shelf life of fresh and processed meats. MCCRAW/GREGORY

Requisite: Agricultural Institute Only

Typically offered in Fall only

ANS 102  Animal Feeds and Nutrition  (3 credit hours)  

Basics of animal nutrition and feeding. Identification and classification of common feedstuffs, including relative nutritional value for livestock and poultry. General nutrition and changes in requirements as influenced by production and the animal's life cycle. Applied aspects of feeding and nutrition of livestock and poultry. Agricultural Institute Students Only (Class= 01 or 02).

Requisite: Agricultural Institute Only

Typically offered in Fall only

ANS 103  Beef Production  (3 credit hours)  

Genetics, reproduction, nutrition, animal health, forage management and marketing channels as related to beef cattle enterprises.

Requisite: Agricultural Institute Only

Typically offered in Fall only

ANS 104  Swine Production  (4 credit hours)  

Management principles associated with swine production. Primary emphasis on interactions of health, equipment, nutrition, reproduction and genetics during nursery, finishing, farrowing and breeding phases of production. Management of farrowing, finishing and farrow to finish operations. Emphasis on management kills, computer applications and economics.

Requisite: Agricultural Institute Only

Typically offered in Spring only

ANS 105  Introduction to Companion Animal Science  (3 credit hours)  

Companion animals are often considered family members. This course surveys the variation available in companion animals (dog breeds, cat breeds, fish, reptiles, amphibians, rabbits, pet pigs, ferrets, hamsters, gerbils, mice, rats, birds & newer pets such as hedgehogs, prairie dogs & sugar gliders) and then examines related human and animal issues in more depth. Biological explanations are stressed for understanding disease states and normal behaviors of companion animals. These explanations are discussed from the point of view of problem behaviors in the average home housing these animals. This course will help educate the students about companion animals so that both the animals and their human families will be happier and more productive members of society. ANS 105 will enable students to pick the pet or specific breed that is best for them so that pets and owners stay together. Restricted to Freshmen and Sophomores.

Restriction: Freshmen & Sophomores only

GEP Natural Sciences

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

ANS 110  Introduction to Equine Science  (3 credit hours)  

Introduction to Equine Science is a course designed for Freshmen and Sophomores of any major. There are no pre-requisites for this course. We will discuss terminology, impact of horses on history and society, breeds, uses, management, genetics, reproduction, health, nutrition, behavior, and business aspects of the horse industry. Restricted to Freshmen and Sophomores.

Prerequisite: Freshman standing or Sophomore standing

GEP Natural Sciences

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

ANS 150  Introduction to Animal Science  (3 credit hours)  

Introduction to the principles and physiology of animal management, the contributions of animals and animal products to humanity, the application of science to to animal production, and issues regarding animal production. The course includes biological aspects of animal science such as animal behavior, anatomical and physiological aspects of reproduction and nutrition, animal breeding and genetics, and human/animal interactions. Normal management and production techniques [including proper terminology] as well as social issues and current events related to livestock, equines, and companion mammals are discussed. Prerequisite: None. Course is 3 credits. Class meets Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 8:30 to 9:20 am in Fall and Spring, Internet only during the Summer. Fall semesters are restricted to new incoming Animal Science Freshmen. Open to all students in Spring and Summer.

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

ANS 151  Introduction to Animal Science Lab  (1 credit hours)  

Hands-on experience and demonstrations with livestock and horses; identification of common management equipment and knowledge of proper use; animal tracts, organs, skulls, feeds, breeds, and other animal-related items or topics. The lecture (ANS 150) must be taken concurrently or have been passed previously with a C-minus or higher. This lab course is restricted to the following majors: Animal Science, Ag Extension, Ag Science, and Ag Education. Transportation is provided to the off-campus labs, and students will be returned to campus prior to the end of the scheduled lab period.

Corequisite: ANS 150; R: Animal Science or Ag Extension or Ag Science or Ag Education majors

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

ANS 201  Techniques of Animal Care  (2 credit hours)  

A laboratory course in the applied management of beef cattle, dairy cattle, equine, swine and small ruminants with required participatory assignments of common techniques utilized in livestock production. These techniques include but are not limited to castration, animal ID, and hoof trimming. Most of course will be held at the various Teaching Educational Units and will be held outdoors. Therefore, students should arrive for the course dressed appropriately for the lab activities and weather conditions of each day. Students will be working with animals, which comes with an inherent risk of injury. Students will be instructed on safety measures at the beginning of the semester and before each lab. Transportation will be provided to the scheduled course meetings but students will be required to provide their own transportation to the Teaching Educational Units for required assignments outside of class time.

Prerequisite: ANS 150 and ANS 151 (all ANS Majors) or ANS 101 (Ag Institute Livestock, Poultry Mgmt Program; Restriction: Junior or Senior Animal Science majors

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

ANS 205  Physiology of Domestic Animals  (3 credit hours)  

This course is designed to introduce students to mammalian physiology (structure and function) with emphasis on livestock species. Students will gain a basic understanding of body systems including circulatory, muscular, skeletal, digestive, and reproductive systems and functions of those systems with relevance to the whole animal and maintenance of homeostasis.

Prerequisite: (BIO 181 or BIO 183) and Sophomore standing

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

ANS 206  Anatomy of Domestic Animals Lab  (1 credit hours)  

This lab course is designed for Animal Science majors to take with the ANS 205 lectures (Physiology of Domestic Animals). Students will learn to identify major anatomical and cellular structures from domestic animal (livestock) specimens through examin

Corequisite: ANS 205

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

ANS 208/PB 208/AEE 208  Agricultural Biotechnology: Issues and Implications  (3 credit hours)  

Trends and issues of agricultural biotechnology in today's society are addressed while covering the basic biological science behind the technology. Applications of and policy issues associated with plant, animal, and environmental biotechnology used in the agricultural industry are examined from an interdisciplinary approach.

Prerequisite: (BIO 105 or BIO 115 or BIO 181 or BIO 183)

GEP Interdisciplinary Perspectives

Typically offered in Spring and Summer

ANS 215/HS 215  Agricultural Genetics  (3 credit hours)  

To provide an introduction to the science of genetics as applied to agriculture. Emphasis is given to qualitative and quantitative genetics. By the end of this course, students should be able to apply genetic concepts to efficiently solve problems and make predictions necessary for "real-life" agricultural situations.

Prerequisite: BIO 183 or equivalent or instructor's consent

GEP Natural Sciences

Typically offered in Fall only

ANS 220  Reproductive Physiology  (3 credit hours)  

Biological processes in reproduction and lactation with emphasis on domestic mammals such as cattle, sheep, goats, horses, swine, dogs, cand cats. Environmental and genetic factors that affect these processes. Identification, evaluation and solutions of problems in these physiological areas.

Prerequisite: ANS 205 or BIO 250 or ZO 250

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

ANS 221  Reproductive Physiology Lab  (1 credit hours)  

ANS 221 is a laboratory course that introduces students to the application of principles of reproduction and lactation in domestic mammals. Students must have either completed or concurrently be enrolled in ANS 220. This course is restricted to Animal Science majors (SAS, IAS).

Corequisite of ANS 220

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

ANS 225  Principles of Animal Nutrition  (3 credit hours)  

This online Principles of Animal Nutrition course is designed for non-Animal Science majors and off-campus students. It includes: feed classification, gastrointestinal tract anatomy of domestic mammals, nutrients and their functions, digestion and metabolism, feed regulations, and feeding/nutrition of cattle, small ruminants, horses, swine, poultry, dogs, cats, and rabbits. For on-campus students, ANS 225 counts toward the Animal Science minor but only counts as a Free Elective for Animal Science majors.

Typically offered in Summer only

ANS 230  Animal Nutrition  (3 credit hours)  

Introduction to nutrition, digestion, and absorption in domestic mammals. Major nutrient classes and their functions in the body, feed classification and chemical analysis, feed processing, and nutrient requirements.

Prerequisite: ANS 150 or BIO 183; ANS 205 is also recommended.

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

ANS 231  Animal Nutrition Lab  (1 credit hours)  

ANS 231 is a laboratory course that introduces students to the application of principles of nutrition and applied feeding of domestic mammals. Students must have either completed or concurrently be enrolled in ANS 230. This course is restricted to Animal Science Majors (SAS, IAS).

Corequisite: ANS 230

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

ANS 240/ANS 240A  Livestock Merchandising  (3 credit hours)  

This course is designed to acquaint students with different methods for merchandising livestock and with strategies for adding value to products produced from livestock. Students will learn new ways to promote a farming operation. Required visits to Ani

Prerequisite: ANS 150; Restrictive Statement: Students must be Juniors or Seniors

Typically offered in Spring only

ANS 240A/ANS 240  Livestock Merchandising  (3 credit hours)  

This course is designed to acquaint students with different methods for merchandising livestock and with strategies for adding value to products produced from livestock. Students will learn new ways to promote a farming operation. Required visits to Ani

Prerequisite: ANS 150; Restrictive Statement: Students must be Juniors or Seniors

Typically offered in Spring only

ANS 260  Basic Swine Science  (2 credit hours)  

Basic disciplines and concepts involved in swine production including: industry structure, trends and statistics; production phases and buildings; genetic improvement; reproduction; nutrition; health and biosecurity; nutrient management; marketing, meat quality, and career opportunities in the swine industry.

Restriction: Non-ANS (Animal Science) students only. ANS students cannot take this course for credit.

Typically offered in Spring only

ANS 261  Swine Health and Biosecurity  (1 credit hours)  

Introduction and basic overview of the immune system, swine disease transmission and pathobiology, standard biosecurity protocols, identification of disease in pigs, basic treatment administration, and disease prevention.

Prerequisite: ANS 150 or equivalent

Typically offered in Spring only

ANS 262  Swine Breeding and Gestation Management  (1 credit hours)  

Management principles associated with breeding and gestation in swine. Emphasis on reproductive anatomy and physiology of boars and sows, development of replacement animals, semen production and evaluation, artificial insemination, and use of reproductive records. Extensive use of reproductive case studies.

Prerequisite: ANS 150 or equivalent

Typically offered in Spring only

ANS 263  Farrowing Management  (1 credit hours)  

Advanced integration and application of factors important in the proper care and management of swine during farrowing and lactation.

Prerequisite: ANS 150 or equivalent

Typically offered in Spring and Summer

ANS 264  Swine Nursery and Finishing Management  (1 credit hours)  

Overview of the critical management, housing, and financial considerations relevant to the successful operation of a swine nursery, grow-finish, or wean to finish enterprise.

Prerequisite: ANS 150 or equivalent

Typically offered in Spring and Summer

ANS 265  Contemporary Issues in the Swine Industry  (1 credit hours)  

Overview of current issues affecting pork production in the United States, including, but not limited to: environment, Swine welfare and profitability/market issues. Development of skills to promote animal agriculture when dealing with the media and general public.

Prerequisite: ANS 150 or equivalent

Typically offered in Spring only

ANS 266  Swine Environment Management  (1 credit hours)  

Course includes response of swine to thermal environment ventilation system design and analysis, heating and cooling, systems and examples of various designs for all phases of production. Troubleshooting and energy analysis will be included as well.

Prerequisite: ANS 150 or equivalent

Typically offered in Fall only

ANS 267  Swine Manure and Nutrient Management  (1 credit hours)  

Course includes manure production rates, manure handling systems, storage and manure management planning for land applications. Some odor mitigation technologies will be covered.

Prerequisite: ANS 150 or equivalent

Typically offered in Spring only

ANS 268  Employee Management for the Swine Industry  (1 credit hours)  

Effective employee management in swine production units. Principles, policies, and practices related to hiring, development and retention of employees, as well as fundamental organizational management.

Prerequisite: ANS 150 or equivalent

Typically offered in Fall only

ANS 269  Internship in the Swine Industry  (1 credit hours)  

Experiential learning in the swine industry through opportunities that provide hands-on experience and exposure to the scope of pork enterprises. Students can expect to apply principles and practices already learned, and add practical experience to their skill sets and knowledge base. Individualized/Independent Study and Research courses require a Course Agreement for Students Enrolled in Non-Standard Courses be completed by the student and faculty member prior to registration by the department.

Prerequisite: ANS 150 or equivalent

Typically offered in Summer only

ANS 270  Pork Export Markets from a Swine Production Perspective  (1 credit hours)  

Introduction to global markets; cultural preferences and customs associated with the global swine industry. International trade regulations and potential impact of foreign animal diseases and bioterrorism affecting the U.S. swine industry.

Prerequisite: ANS 150 or equivalent

Typically offered in Summer only

ANS 271  Swine Nutrition  (1 credit hours)  

Principles involved with developing and implementing a swine feeding program, including fundamentals of feeding pigs, understanding nutrients used in pig diets, factors affecting nutrient recommendations, feeding systems for pigs, feed ingredients, and formulation of swine diets.

"Restriction: Restricted to non-ANS (Animal Science) students. ANS students cannot take the course for credit."

Typically offered in Fall only

ANS 281  Professional Development of PreVeterinary Track Students  (1 credit hours)  

This course introduces PreVeterinary track students to the scope of the veterinary profession and to current issues affecting veterinary professionals. The course will help students gain an understanding of the professional requirement of the veterinary

Prerequisite: ZO 160 or BIO 125 or BIO 181 or BIO 183

Typically offered in Spring only

ANS 290  Professional Development for Animal Science Careers  (2 credit hours)  

This course will teach students how to navigate the career decision-making process to make an informed decision and discuss career options in the field of Animal Science. The course will also help students evaluate and develop their professional compete

Animal Science Majors Only

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

ANS 303  Principles of Equine Evaluation  (2 credit hours)  

Students will learn about and apply methods for evaluating conformation and function of performance and halter horses, soundness, breed standards, rules and regulations for evaluation, selection, and performance. Guest lecturers and field trips.

Prerequisite: ANS 150 or ANS 110

Typically offered in Spring only

ANS 304  Dairy Cattle Evaluation  (2 credit hours)  

The first half of this course covers basic aspects of dairy cattle breeds, dairy character, form and function including type traits and linear scoring of dairy cattle, interpreting and using judging scorecards, comparing/evaluating dairy cattle, andplacing animals in a class. The second half of the course develops the student's ability to correctly evaluate dairy cattle classes, but more importantly to support their opinions through oral communication.

Prerequisite: ANS 150

Typically offered in Spring only

ANS 309  Livestock Evaluation  (3 credit hours)  

Students will be exposed to basic concepts associated with growth, development and value determination of livestock. Familiarization with official USDA grading standards for cattle, sheep, swine and goats is emphasized. Introduction to judging terminology, placing classes of livestock and justification through oral reasons.

Prerequisite: ANS 150

Typically offered in Spring only

ANS 322/FS 322/PO 322  Muscle Foods and Eggs  (3 credit hours)  

Processing and preserving fresh poultry, red meats, seafood, and eggs. Ante- and post-mortem events as they affect quality, yield, and compositional characteristics of muscle foods. Principles and procedures involved in the production of processedmeat items.

Prerequisite: ZO 160, BIO 181 or BIO 183

Typically offered in Fall only

ANS 324/FS 324  Milk and Dairy Products  (3 credit hours)  

Introduction to the manufacture of dairy products. Dairy processing procedures from the farm, through the dairy plant, and to the consumer are studied. The course consists of 15 learning modules, three exams, and a project.

Prerequisite: BIO 181 or 183, CH 101

Typically offered in Fall only

ANS 330  Laboratory Animal Science  (3 credit hours)  

A sophomore to senior level course designed to cover the basics of laboratory animal science, a specialty dealing with the use of vertebrate animal species in intensive research. Some topics to be covered are: husbandry, facility management, animalhealth and welfare, diagnostics, surgical area management, research methods and administrative duties. Students will use the material for studying for the certification as a Laboratory Animal Technician via the American Association For Laboratory Animal Science (AALAS). A separate fee is required for certification; this fee is not covered by tuition for ANS 330. Must hold sophomore standing or higher.

Typically offered in Spring only

ANS 395  Animal Science Study Abroad  (1-6 credit hours)  

This course provides an international perspective on animal management, conservation and various animal-related industries by allowing students to study abroad in various locations around the world, with different destinations offered each academic year. Credit hours are variable based on length of travel and classroom instruction pre- and post-travel consistent with NCSU policies and practices. Course may be repeated for credit to visit different destinations only. Significant expenses for travel are involved. Please consult with the instructor or the Study Abroad Office for specific program details.

GEP Global Knowledge

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

ANS 400  Companion Animal Management  (3 credit hours)  

Anatomy, physiology, nutrition, genetics, and health of companion animals including cats, dogs, rabbits, rats, mice, reptiles, amphibians, and fish. Problem solving and enterprise management skills in laboratories.

Prerequisite: ANS 105 and Junior standing

Typically offered in Spring only

ANS 402  Beef Cattle Management  (3 credit hours)  

ANS 402 integrates technical information from nutrition, reproduction, genetics, physiology, and animal welfare into management decisions that will enhance a beef cattle operation. Students will engage in beef cattle and environmental management and varied communication formats to explore relationships between sectors of the beef industry from cow-calf to the consumer.

Prerequisite: ANS 150, Junior standing

Typically offered in Spring only

ANS 403  Swine Management  (3 credit hours)  

Management principles associated with swine production. Emphasis on interactions of health, equipment, nutrition, reproduction and genetics during nursery, finishing, farrowing and breeding phases of production. Waste management practices and alternatives, development of marketing strategies and economic evaluation of management practices.

Prerequisite: ANS 150; Restrictive Statement: Students must be Juniors or Seniors

Typically offered in Fall only

ANS 404  Dairy Cattle Management  (3 credit hours)  

In ANS 404, students will develop a better understanding of dairy cattle management with an emphasis on the impact of decisions on productivity, health, profitability, and the future of the dairy enterprise.

Prerequisite: ANS 150, Junior standing

Typically offered in Spring only

ANS 408  Small Ruminant Management  (3 credit hours)  

Principles and practices of production, management, and marketing of sheep and goats. Role of genetics, nutrition, reproduction and animal health. Hands-on experience and field trips during labs.

Prerequisite: ANS 150, Junior standing

Typically offered in Fall only

ANS 410  Equine Breeding Farm Management  (3 credit hours)  

Equine anatomy, physiology, nutrition, genetics and health. Laboratory emphasis on reproductive management, breeding, problem solving, and management skills. Field trips required.

Prerequisite: ANS 110 and Junior standing

Typically offered in Spring only

ANS 411  Management of Growing and Performance Horses  (3 credit hours)  

This course is an overview of scientific applications used in management of growing and performance horses. Topics include: nutrition and feeding, disease prevention, exercise conditioning, and methods of evaluation and selection. Students required to provide their own transportation to labs. Must hold junior or senior standing.

Prerequisite: ANS 110

Typically offered in Fall only

ANS 415/NTR 415/PO 415/PO 515/NTR 515/ANS 515  Comparative Nutrition  (3 credit hours)  

Principles of nutrition, including the classification of nutrients and the nutrient requirements of and metabolism by different species for health, growth, maintenance and productive functions.

Prerequisite: ANS 225 or ANS 230 or CH 220 or CH 223 or CH 227

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

ANS 425/FM 425/PO 425/NTR 525/FM 525/ANS 525/PO 525/NTR 425  Feed Manufacturing Technology  (3 credit hours)  

Feed mill management, feed ingredient purchasing, inventory, storage, and quality evaluation, computerized feed formulation, feeding programs for poultry and swine, feed mill design, equipment, maintenance, operation, safety, state and federal regulations pertaining to feed manufacture.

Prerequisite: ANS(NTR,PO) 415 or ANS 230 or ANS 225

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

ANS 440/ANS 540  Animal Genetic Improvement  (3 credit hours)  

Modern evaluation and selection procedures for domestic animals; selection goals, estimation of breeding values and performance testing; their impact on genetic changes.

Prerequisite: (ANS/HS 215 or GN 311) and (ST 311 or ST/BUS 350) and Junior standing

Typically offered in Fall and Summer

ANS 452/ANS 552/PHY 552/PHY 452  Comparative Reproductive Physiology and Biotechnology  (3 credit hours)  

Comparative approach to examining aspects of reproductive physiology in selected vertebrate species. Detailed examination of current reproductive biotechnologies and ethical issues associated with the application of reproductive biotechnologies. Credit

Prerequisite: ANS 220

Typically offered in Fall only

ANS 453/ANS 553  Physiology and Genetics of Growth and Development  (3 credit hours)  

Introduction to the basic concepts of growth with emphasis on domestic mammals. Growth of the major classes of animal tissues and regulation by endogenous and exogenous factors. Relationship to efficiency of animal production. Credit will not be give

Typically offered in Fall only

ANS 454/NTR 454/ANS 554  Lactation, Milk and Nutrition  (3 credit hours)  

Nutritional properties of milk as a high-quality food with nutritional diversity. Principles of physiology, biochemistry and cell biology in the mammary gland. Procedures of milk production and milk collection for milk quality and nutrition. Human lactation vs. that of domestic animals. Impacts of biotechnology and food safety on dairy production. Credit will not be given for both ANS 454 and 554.

Prerequisite: ANS 230 or FS/NTR 400; BCH 451 or ZO 421

Typically offered in Spring only

ANS 480  Judging Team  (1 credit hours)  

Students practice judging techniques for livestock, horses, or dairy animals, including ranking animals and providing oral reasons to defend the rankings. Students meet weekly with a coach to practice locally and will also travel to compete in one or two regional or national competitions. Each team (livestock, horse, dairy) is expected to raise funds to finance the trips. Students earn 1 credit for being on a team, and can earn up to 3 credits of Free Elective for ANS 480 by serving on the judging team for different species. Field trips that last several days are required. Departmental Approval Required. Course may be taken up to 3 times (once per species).

Prerequisite: ANS 303 or ANS 304 or ANS 309

Typically offered in Fall only

ANS 492  Professional Internship Experience in the Animal Sciences  (1-3 credit hours)  

This course provides an opportunity for students to gain real-world experience relevant to their academic and career goals. A minimum of 45 hours must be completed for each credit hour earned, with 3 credit hours maximum for each experience. The experience must be arranged by the student and approved by the Department of Animal Science prior to the start of the experience. To gain approval, a student must submit the completed ANS 492 contract and have it approved by his/her experience supervisor, academic advisor and the ANS 492 coordinator. In addition to the work described in the contract, a student will complete a series of reflective assignments during and at the end of the experience.

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

ANS 493  Research Experience in the Animal Sciences  (1-3 credit hours)  

This course provides an opportunity for students to gain real-world experience in a scientific research program. A minimum of 45 hours must be completed for each credit hour earned, with 3 credit hours maximum for each experience. The experience must be arranged by the student and approved by the Department of Animal Science prior to the start of the experience. To gain approval, a student must submit the completed ANS 493 contract and have it approved by his/her research supervisor, academic advisor and the ANS 493 coordinator. In addition to the work described in the contract, a student will complete a series of reflective assignments during and at the end of the experience.

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

ANS 494  Teaching Experience in the Animal Sciences  (1-3 credit hours)  

This course provides an opportunity for students to gain experience with some aspect of teaching, including: leading or facilitating lessons, producing educational resources, or education research. A minimum of 45 hours must be completed for each credit hour earned, with 3 credit hours maximum for each experience. The experience must be arranged by the student and approved by the Animal Science Department prior to the start of the experience. To gain approval, a student must submit the completed ANS 494 contract and have it approved by his/her research supervisor, academic advisor and the ANS 494 coordinator. If the experience involves education research, the research mentor is encouraged to require a research paper or poster presentation as part of the work expectations when appropriate. In addition to the work described in the contract, a student will complete a series of reflective assignments during and at the end of the experience.

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

ANS 495  Special Topics in Animal Science  (1-3 credit hours)  

Offered as needed to present material not normally available in regular course offerings or for offering of new courses on a trial basis.

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

ANS 515/ANS 415/NTR 415/PO 415/PO 515/NTR 515  Comparative Nutrition  (3 credit hours)  

Principles of nutrition, including the classification of nutrients and the nutrient requirements of and metabolism by different species for health, growth, maintenance and productive functions.

Prerequisite: ANS 225 or ANS 230 or CH 220 or CH 223 or CH 227

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

ANS 525/PO 525/NTR 425/ANS 425/FM 425/PO 425/NTR 525/FM 525  Feed Manufacturing Technology  (3 credit hours)  

Feed mill management, feed ingredient purchasing, inventory, storage, and quality evaluation, computerized feed formulation, feeding programs for poultry and swine, feed mill design, equipment, maintenance, operation, safety, state and federal regulations pertaining to feed manufacture.

Prerequisite: ANS(NTR,PO) 415 or ANS 230 or ANS 225

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

ANS 530  Advanced Applied Animal Reproduction  (3 credit hours)  

Current reproductive management techniques for each of the major mammalian livestock species. Enable students to develop reproductive decision making skills. Must hold graduate status.

Prerequisite: ANS 220

Typically offered in Spring only

ANS 531  Advanced Applied Animal Reproduction Lab  (1 credit hours)  

Practical experience in routine reproductive management techniques discussed in ANS 530. Must hold graduate status.

Prerequisite: ANS 220, Corequisite: ANS 530

Typically offered in Spring only

ANS 540/ANS 440  Animal Genetic Improvement  (3 credit hours)  

Modern evaluation and selection procedures for domestic animals; selection goals, estimation of breeding values and performance testing; their impact on genetic changes.

Prerequisite: (ANS/HS 215 or GN 311) and (ST 311 or ST/BUS 350) and Junior standing

Typically offered in Fall and Summer

ANS 550/NTR 550  Applied Ruminant Nutrition  (3 credit hours)  

Applied concepts in ruminant nutrition for the practicing agricultural professional. Protein, energy, vitamin and mineral nutrition in relation to the nutritional needs and practical feeding of beef cattle, dairy cattle, sheep, and goats. New developments in feeding systems, feed additives and the prevention and treatment of metabolic disorders. Emphasis on solving problems in case studies. Permission given to undergraduates

Prerequisite: ANS 230 or ANS(NTR,PO) 415. Permission given to undergraduates

Typically offered in Fall only

ANS 552/PHY 552/PHY 452/ANS 452  Comparative Reproductive Physiology and Biotechnology  (3 credit hours)  

Comparative approach to examining aspects of reproductive physiology in selected vertebrate species. Detailed examination of current reproductive biotechnologies and ethical issues associated with the application of reproductive biotechnologies. Credit

Prerequisite: ANS 220

Typically offered in Fall only

ANS 553/ANS 453  Physiology and Genetics of Growth and Development  (3 credit hours)  

Introduction to the basic concepts of growth with emphasis on domestic mammals. Growth of the major classes of animal tissues and regulation by endogenous and exogenous factors. Relationship to efficiency of animal production. Credit will not be give

Typically offered in Fall only

ANS 554/ANS 454/NTR 454  Lactation, Milk and Nutrition  (3 credit hours)  

Nutritional properties of milk as a high-quality food with nutritional diversity. Principles of physiology, biochemistry and cell biology in the mammary gland. Procedures of milk production and milk collection for milk quality and nutrition. Human lactation vs. that of domestic animals. Impacts of biotechnology and food safety on dairy production. Credit will not be given for both ANS 454 and 554.

Prerequisite: ANS 230 or FS/NTR 400; BCH 451 or ZO 421

Typically offered in Spring only

ANS 561/NTR 561  Equine Nutrition  (3 credit hours)  

This course explores concepts in equine nutrition including digestive physiology of horses, nutrient requirements for different classes of horses and feed management. Ration evaluation and balancing, as well as problem solving will be a core component to this course.

Prerequisite:NTR 500 or NTR/FS 501 or NTR/PO 515

Typically offered in Spring only

ANS 565/NTR 565  Advanced Canine and Feline Nutrition  (3 credit hours)  

This course is about the advanced principles of nutrition within canines and felines. The course focuses on the unique gastro- intestinal tracts for the two species as well as their specific nutrient requirements and how the animal industry addresses th

Restriction: Graduate Student or Senior with 3.35 GPA; Prerequisite: 400-level Nutrition Course

Typically offered in Fall only

ANS 571/BCH 571  Regulation of Metabolism  (3 credit hours)  

Study of hormonal, enzymatic and molecular-genetic regulation of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism; emphasis on mammalian species.

Prerequisite: BCH 451, GN 311, a course in physiology, cell biology

Typically offered in Fall only

ANS 575  Current Topics in Genomics and Proteomics in Animal Science  (3 credit hours)  

The objective of this course is to provide students with an integrated exposure to the major current concepts in genomics and proteomics. Genomic and proteomic methods will be covered at a level that will allow students to read and comprehend articles

Prerequisite: ANS 215 or GN 411

Typically offered in Spring only

ANS 590  Topical Problems in Animal Science  (1-3 credit hours)  

Selection or assignment of special problems in various phases of animal science.

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

ANS 601  Animal Science Seminar  (1 credit hours)  

Weekly seminars on topics of current interest given by resident faculty members, graduate students and visiting lecturers.

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

ANS 603  Reproductive Physiology Seminar  (1 credit hours)  

Weekly seminars on topics of current interest given by resident faculty members, graduate students and visiting lecturers.

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

ANS 604  Animal Breeding and Genetics Seminar  (1 credit hours)  

Weekly seminars on topics of current interest given by resident faculty members, graduate students and visiting lecturers.

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

ANS 610  Topical Problems in Animal Science  (1-6 credit hours)  

Selection or assignment of special problems in various phases of animal science.

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

ANS 641  Practicum in Animal Science  (1-3 credit hours)  

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

ANS 685  Master's Supervised Teaching  (1-3 credit hours)  

Teaching experience under the mentorship of faculty who assist the student in planning for the teaching assignment, observe and provide feedback to the student during the teaching assignment, and evaluate the student upon completion of the assignment.

Prerequisite: Master's student

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

ANS 690  Master's Exam  (1-9 credit hours)  

For students in non-thesis master's programs who have completed all other requirements of the degree except preparing for and taking the final master's exam.

Prerequisite: Master's student

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

ANS 693  Master's Supervised Research  (1-9 credit hours)  

Instruction in research and research under the mentorship of a member of the Graduate Faculty.

Prerequisite: Master's student

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

ANS 695  Master's Thesis Research  (1-9 credit hours)  

Thesis research.

Prerequisite: Master's student

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

ANS 696  Summer Thesis Research  (1 credit hours)  

For graduate students whose programs of work specify no formal course work during a summer session and who will be devoting full time to thesis research.

Prerequisite: Master's student

Typically offered in Summer only

ANS 699  Master's Thesis Preparation  (1-9 credit hours)  

For students who have completed all credit hour requirements and full-time enrollment for the master's degree and are writing and defending their thesis.

Prerequisite: Master's student

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

ANS 701/NTR 701  Protein and Amino Acid Metabolism  (3 credit hours)  

Study of protein and amino acid metabolism, regulation, dietary requirements and techniques for their investigation in human and other animals.

Prerequisite: BCH 453, ZO 421, a 400-level nutrition course

Typically offered in Spring only

ANS 702/PHY 702  Reproductive Physiology of Mammals  (3 credit hours)  

Survey of reproductive strategies among vertebrates; in-depth coverage of mammalian reproductive physiology; gametogenesis, fertilization, embryonic and fetal development, parturition, puberty, neuroendrocrine control mechanisms in male and female mammals.

Prerequisite: ZO 421

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

ANS 708/GN 708  Genetics of Animal Improvement  (3 credit hours)  

Emphasis on the utilization of basic principles of population and quantitative genetics in animal improvement. Factors affecting genic and genotypic frequencies and methods of estimating genetic and nongenetic variance, heritabilities and breeding values. The roles of mating systems and selection procedures in producing superior genetic populations.

Prerequisite: GN 311 and ST 512

Typically offered in Spring only

ANS 709  Energy Metabolism  (3 credit hours)  

Relationship of biochemical and physiological events within cell, tissue, organ and system with nutrient needs as sources of energy for productive animal life. Digestion, absorption and metabolism of energy sources. Processes of energy transformations within the body in relation to energetics, biological oxidation, anabolic and catabolic systems, metabolic control, partitioning and efficiency.

Prerequisite: BCH 553

ANS 713/GN 713  Quantitative Genetics and Breeding  (3 credit hours)  

Quantitative and population genetic theory of breeding problems; partitioning of genetic variance, maternal effects, genotype by environment interaction and genetic correlation; selection indexes; design and analysis of selection experiments; marker-assisted selection.

Prerequisite: GN 509, ST 512

Typically offered in Fall only

ANS 726/FOR 726/CS 726  Advanced Topics In Quantitative Genetics and Breeding  (3 credit hours)  

Advanced topics in quantitative genetics pertinent to population improvement for quantitative and categorical traits with special applications to plant and animal breeding. DNA markers - phenotype associations. The theory and application of linear mixed models, BLUP and genomic selection using maximum likelihood and Bayesian approaches. Pedigree and construction of genomic relationships matrices from DNA markers and application in breeding.

Prerequisite: ST 511, Corequisite: ST 512

Typically offered in Spring only

ANS 780/PHY 780  Mammalian Endocrinology  (3 credit hours)  

Mammalian endocrine system with emphasis on ontogeny and anatomy of key organs; synthesis and action of hormones. Role of hormones in regulation of physiological processes such as metabolism, exocrine function, digestion, ion balance, behavior, lactation, growth and reproduction.

Prerequisite: BCH 451, ZO 421

ANS 790  Advanced Special Topics in Animal Science  (1-6 credit hours)  

Selection or assignment of advanced special problems in various disciplines of animal science.

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

ANS 803  Reproductive Physiology Seminar  (1 credit hours)  

Weekly seminars on topics of current interest given by resident faculty members, graduate students and visiting lecturers.

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

ANS 804  Animal Breeding and Genetics Seminar  (1 credit hours)  

Weekly seminars on topics of current interest given by resident faculty members, graduate students and visiting lecturers.

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

ANS 810  Topical Problems in Animal Science  (1-6 credit hours)  

Selection or assignment of special problems in various phases of animal science.

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

ANS 841  Practicum in Animal Science  (1-3 credit hours)  

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

ANS 885  Doctoral Supervised Teaching  (1-3 credit hours)  

Teaching experience under the mentorship of faculty who assist the student in planning for the teaching assignment, observe and provide feedback to the student during the teaching assignment, and evaluate the student upon completion of the assignment

Prerequisite: Doctoral student

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

ANS 890  Doctoral Preliminary Examination  (1-9 credit hours)  

For students who are preparing for and taking written and/or oral preliminary exams.

Prerequisite: Doctoral student

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

ANS 893  Doctoral Supervised Research  (1-9 credit hours)  

Instruction in research and research under the mentorship of a member of the Graduate Faculty.

Prerequisite: Doctoral student

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

ANS 895  Doctoral Dissertation Research  (1-9 credit hours)  

Dissertation research

Prerequisite: Doctoral student

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

ANS 896  Summer Thesis Research  (1 credit hours)  

For graduate students whose programs of work specify no formal course work during a summer session and who will be devoting full time to thesis research.

Prerequisite: Doctoral student

Typically offered in Summer only

ANS 899  Doctoral Dissertation Preparation  (1-9 credit hours)  

For students who have completed all credit hours, full-time enrollment, preliminary examination, and residency requirements for the doctoral degree, and are writing and defending their dissertations.

Prerequisite: Doctoral student

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer