Parks, Recreation, and Tourism Management (PRT)

PRT 150  Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management Orientation  (1 credit hours)  

Introduction topics related to the department of Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management; The recreation, tourism, sport and golf industries; all PRTM curricula; advising, academic skills, and team work; and research and personnel involved in the department and college. PRT, SMT and PGM Majors Only.

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

PRT 152  Introduction to Parks, Recreation and Tourism  (3 credit hours)  

Introduction to the professional field of recreation by presenting the basic principles, fundamentals and concepts of recreation as related to such factors as recreation history and objectives, sociological and economic aspects of recreation, leadership qualities and facility provision; and settings for organized recreation in modern society.

GEP Social Sciences

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

PRT 156  Professional Golf Management Orientation  (3 credit hours)  

Overview of the golf industry and introduction to the concepts and practices of effective golf management including turfgrass management, golf shop operations, food & beverage control, customer services, personnel management, and tournament operations. Theoretical foundations for understanding leisure behavior and the parks, recreation and tourism management profession.

Prerequisite: PGM Majors

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

PRT 200  Health, Wellness and the Pursuit of Happiness  (3 credit hours)  

Despite having one of the highest standards of living in the world, a growing number of Americans are unhappy. The purpose of this course is to help students understand the behaviors that are personally beneficial and contribute to a healthy and happy life. Students will learn what research says about what makes us happy and healthy, and how to put those strategies into practice. Course modules focus on activities that have been proven to increase happiness along with strategies to build healthy habits.

GEP Social Sciences

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

PRT 210  Golf Management I  (1 credit hours)  

Emphasis on concepts, techniques, and practices of teaching golf skills; understanding the Professional Golfers' Association Constitution; rules of golf, golf tournament operations; and golf car fleet management.

Prerequisite: PGM Majors & PRT 156

Typically offered in Spring only

PRT 211  Golf Management II  (1 credit hours)  

Advanced concepts, techniques, and practices of teaching golf; golfer development programs, golf club design and repair.

Prerequisite: PGM Majors & PRT 210

Typically offered in Fall only

PRT 212  Golf Instructor Development  (2 credit hours)  

Students will learn to teach using a variety of instructional methods including various technologicalmethods. Students will also learn to teach to students with a variety of learning styles including visual, auditory and kinesthetic. The students will learn the fundamental theories and concepts of the golf swing as well as basic ball flight laws.

Prerequisite: PGM Majors and PRT 156 and PRT 210

Typically offered in Fall only

PRT 214/HESM 214  Introduction to Adventure Education  (3 credit hours)  

History and philosophy, social psychology of adventure, theories of adventure, benefits, risk-taking behavior, current rends and issues, research and evaluation, and model programs. Field trip required. Students are responsible for their own transportation for field trip.

Typically offered in Fall only

PRT 215/HESM 215  Principles and Practices of Outdoor Leadership  (3 credit hours)  

Principles and practices of leadership in adventure education and recreation programs: group management, trip planning, staffing, group dynamics, health and safety issues, risk management and other relevant topics.

Typically offered in Spring only

PRT 220  Commercial Recreation and Tourism Management  (3 credit hours)  

Commercial recreation and the tourism industry, including its origin, present characteristics, behavioral foundations and societal impacts. Emphasis on recreation administration in the commercial sector.

Prerequisite: PRT 152

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

PRT 238  Diversity and Inclusion in Recreation and Sport  (3 credit hours)  

Provides knowledge, attitude awareness and resources needed to provide programs, services and facilities for all people. Students gain an understanding of people's differences and potential barriers to participation. 10 hours of volunteer work with people who have disabilities is required. Students are responsible for providing their own transportation to and from volunteer work. PRT, SMT and PGM Majors Only; PRT minors.

Prerequisite: PRT 152

GEP U.S. Diversity

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

PRT 240  Geospatial Applications for Parks, Recreation and Tourism  (3 credit hours)  

Geospatial applications have a multitude of uses in both the private and public sectors and are integral to innovative solutions in parks and recreation. Students will gain an understanding of how spatial data are collected, organized, analyzed, and displayed and learn the foundations of representing environmental and social phenomena in a geospatial environment. Student will be able to explain how geospatial tools enable spatial thinking and problem solving for parks, recreation, and tourism applications, such as siting recreation facilities, mapping health-related issues, and creating compelling maps and visuals for destination marketing. Students will apply spatial concepts to hands-on applications, gaining familiarity with commonly used software.

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

PRT 250  Management of Park and Recreation Facilities  (3 credit hours)  

Management principles applied to park, recreation, sport areas and facilities. Emphasis on operational efficiency, quality service, fiscal responsibility and maintenance management. Laboratory provides for application of management and maintenanceprinciples.

Prerequisite: PRT 152

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

PRT 266  Introduction to Sport Management  (3 credit hours)  

Introduction to concepts and practices of effective sport programming and management at the professional, collegiate and community levels. Overview of various program delivery systems such as fitness, instructional sport, informal sport, and intramural sport. Examination of management elements of sport programming, including planning, personnel, finance, facilities, risk and liability and marketing.

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

PRT 277  Psychological & Cultural Dimensions of Sport  (3 credit hours)  

The psychological behavior of the individual in physical activity and sport. The development of sport and the sports industry, political and cultural significance of sport, and sport in international relationships. The relationship between sport, gender, class, ethnicity, health, drugs, violence, education, and life long physical activity.

Prerequisite: Sport Management or PRT Majors, PRT 266

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

PRT 286  Writing and Speaking in Sports Organizations  (3 credit hours)  

Concepts related to effective communication within sport organizations. Including interpersonal communication, group communication, public speaking, use of electronic media, and basic knowledge and understanding of media in sport and sport enterprises.

Prerequisite: Sport Management or PRT Majors, PRT 266

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

PRT 292  External Learning Experience  (1-3 credit hours)  

Learning experience in parks, recreation, tourism, and sports within an academic framework with agencies external to the department. Contact and arrangements with prospective supervisors initiated by the student. Approval by prospective supervisor and departmental undergraduate coordinator necessary. Students can receive between 1 and 3 hours credit for the the learning experience (1 credit = 45 hours) PRT and SMT majors only.

Prerequisite: PRT 152 and Sophomore Standing

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

PRT 293  Independent Study in Parks, Recreation, & Tourism Management  (1-6 credit hours)  

Independent Study for Parks, Recreation, & Tourism Management students at the freshman and sophomore level developed under the direction of a faculty member. Individualized/Independent Study and Research courses require a "Course Agreement for Students Enrolled in Non-Standard Courses" be completed by the student and faculty member prior to registration by the department.

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

PRT 294  Independent Study in Parks, Recreation, & Tourism Management  (1-6 credit hours)  

Independent Study for Parks, Recreation, & Tourism Management students at the freshman and sophomore level developed under the direction of a faculty member. Individualized/Independent Study and Research courses require a "Course Agreement for Students Enrolled in Non-Standard Courses" be completed by the student and faculty member prior to registration by the department.

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

PRT 295  Special Topics in Parks, Recreation, and Tourism Management  (1-3 credit hours)  

Special topics in the Department of Parks, Recreation, and Tourism Management at the 200 level for offering of courses on an experimental basis.

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

PRT 311  Golf Course Turf Grass Management  (3 credit hours)  

Introduction to the roles and responsibilities of the golf course superintendent as well as the practices and procedures associated with golf course turfgrass management. Preparation for completion of Level II Turfgrass Management, elements of the Professional Golfers' Association of America's Professional Golf Management apprentice program. Periodically class/lab meetings require transportation to area golf facilities. Students are expected to provide their own transportation accommodations.

Prerequisite: PGM Majors and PRT 210 and PRT 211

Typically offered in Fall only

PRT 312  Golf Management III  (1 credit hours)  

Advanced concepts, techniques, and practices of golf management: business analysis, planning and operations, and analysis of the golf swing. Preparation for completion of PGA of America's Professional golf Management Level II knowledge tests and skills simulations.

Prerequisite: PGM Majors and PRT 210 and PRT 211

Typically offered in Spring only

PRT 315  Organization and Administration of Adventure Programs  (3 credit hours)  

Overview of the organizational and administration of adventure programs and services, professional standards, programming, management, staffing, budgeting, public relations, liability and risk management.

Prerequisite: PRT 152

Typically offered in Spring only

PRT 350  Outdoor Recreation Management  (3 credit hours)  

This course explores concepts and methods of outdoor recreation planning and management, with emphasis on public lands. Students will examine environmental and social impacts of recreation and develop strategies that promote quality visitor experiences and sustainable resource management.

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

PRT 351  Outdoor Consortium  (3 credit hours)  

Examines outdoor recreation and resource management approaches and research results from an applied perspective. Students will practice problem-solving techniques and interact with a wide variety of park managers and planners. This course culminatesin a

Typically offered in Spring only

PRT 358  Recreation Program Planning  (4 credit hours)  

The ultimate goal of the recreation and park profession is to improve the quality of life for the people and communities we serve. We often do this by providing programs for people. It is important for the student to realize the breadth of recreation program possibilities and to be able to analyze and apply the program planning principles to deliver services in a variety of recreation settings. As a full-immersion service-learning course, PRT 358 is designed to provide knowledge and tools to enable the student to achieve the above objectives. For many students, this should be one of the most valuable courses in the entire PRT curriculum.

Prerequisite: PRT 152

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

PRT 359  Leadership and Supervision in Recreation  (3 credit hours)  

Systematic principles for managing human resource component of parks, recreation and tourism organizations. Leadership, group dynamics, human resources planning and organizing, employee recruitment, selection and supervision.

Prerequisite: PRT 250

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

PRT 366  Sport Programming  (3 credit hours)  

Foundations, administrative support systems, delivery systems and desirable practices of sport programming. Program delivery systems overview with emphasis on problems and solutions associated with sport programs. Topics include sport league administration, youth sport delivery issues, sport tournament operations, community based sport delivery issues, college/university recreation sport delivery.

Prerequisite: Sport Management and PRT Majors, PRT 266

Typically offered in Fall only

PRT 375  Professional Development and Internship Orientation  (2 credit hours)  

The purpose of PRT 375 is to help students adequately prepare for their internship and for their career following graduation. Students will explore internship opportunities and explore the best practices for internship and/or job seeking through resume preparation, practicing interview skills, utilizing social media, and learning job negotiating skills.

Prerequisite: PRT 152

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

PRT 376  Sport Administration  (3 credit hours)  

Concepts related to policy development, organization and management specific to sport organizations. Including theories and practices of policy development and implementation, management theories, organizational behavior, the strategic management process, organizational design, managing change, and operational planning.

P: PRT 266 and Sports Management students only.

Typically offered in Spring and Summer

PRT 380  Analysis and Evaluation in Parks, Recreation  (3 credit hours)  

Examination of the steps involved in analyzing and estimating the impact of recreation and parks services. Includes relevant issues and useful approaches for systematic analysis. Emphasis is placed on an understanding and development of various types of

Prerequisite: 300-level Statistics course, PRT 359

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

PRT 385  Environmental Education in Practice  (3 credit hours)  

This course is designed to prepare students to enter the environmental education (EE) profession. Topics will include EE professional standards, program planning and delivery, and program evaluation. A significant portion of the course focuses on securing and completing a field placement involving at least 10 contact hours with learners through teaching or observations. In addition, students are expected to attend an EE professional conference which may require overnight travel. Completion of course activities will provide 50-80 hours toward the NC Environmental Education Certification Program. Only students who have taken EMS 355 (Environmental Education Teaching Methods) will be enrolled, except with permission from the instructor.

Typically offered in Spring only

PRT 406  Sports Law  (3 credit hours)  

Fundamental principles of law, especially tort and contract law, applied to sports situations. Analysis of liability of sports personnel in various roles including participant, coach, promoter, trainer and official. Analysis of common law court decisions in sports contexts well as key state and federal statutory legislation such as civil rights and antitrust.

Prerequisite: Junior standing.

Typically offered in Fall and Summer

PRT 407  Services, Facilities and Event Marketing  (3 credit hours)  

Examination of marketing methods as applied to Parks, Recreation, Tourism and Sport Management facilities and programs. Aspects of advanced marketing: market research, marketing strategy and revenue-generation in both public and private settings. Credit will not be given for both PRT 407 and PRT 507

Prerequisite: PRT 358,

Typically offered in Fall only

PRT 410  Food and Beverage Management  (3 credit hours)  

Introduction to practices and procedures in food and beverage service. Basics of food service needs, cost controls, legal issues affecting food and beverage service, staffing, and customer satisfaction. Critical elements of food costing, purchasing, inventory control, menu planning, and security. Preparation for completion of Level III Food and Beverage control elements of the Professional Golfers' Association of America's Professional Golf Management apprentice Program

Prerequisite: Junior standing and PRT 152

Typically offered in Spring only

PRT 411  Club Management  (3 credit hours)  

Introduction to practices and procedures in contemporary club management. Application of general management functions to club environments including human resources, training, financial management marketing; leadership food and beverage service operations facilities and risk management; legal issues; and career planning. Preparation for completion of Club Management elements of the Professional Golfers' Association of America's Professional Golf Management apprentice Program

Prerequisite: Junior standing, PRT 152

Typically offered in Spring only

PRT 412  Golf Course Architecture  (3 credit hours)  

Basic principles of golf course design. Historical architectural influences on current golf course design trends. Strategic golf course design principles, shot values, construction practices, environmental issues, and maintenance issues. Golf course design and management implications. Restricted to PGM and Landscape Arch. Majors. Junior Standing

Prerequisite: PRT 211

Typically offered in Fall only

PRT 413  Golf Management IV  (1 credit hours)  

Advanced concepts, techniques, and practices of golf management: swing concepts of teaching, supervising and delegating, merchandising and inventory control. Preparation for completion of PGA of America's Professional Golf Management Level III knowledge tests and skill simulations.

Prerequisite: PGM Majors and PRT 312

Typically offered in Spring only

PRT 414  PGA Apprentice Program Completion  (0 credit hours)  

Checkpoint mechanism to register the successful completion of the Professional Golfers' Association Apprentice requirement.

Prerequisite: PGM Majors and PRT 312

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

PRT 419  Sustainable Tourism  (3 credit hours)  

This course introduces the concepts and principles associated with sustainable tourism development, emphasizing on their implications for management and planning purposes. Topics to be addressed include: concept, justification and evolution of sustainable development; socio-cultural, economic, and environmental dimensions of sustainable tourism; positive and negative impacts of tourism development; and principles conducive to sustainable tourism planning and community development. Given that each case of tourism development is unique, examples from the U.S. and around the world will be used to examine and discuss issues and practices of sustainable tourism development within different geo-cultural contexts. This course adopts the Problem-Based Learning Format, which promotes and enhances students' analytical skills, problem solving skill and team working skills. Junior or senior standing.

Typically offered in Spring only

PRT 420  Destination Planning and Management  (3 credit hours)  

Destination planning, development, and management from a theoretical and applied perspective. Includes an examination the destination experience, destinations as they fit into the tourism system, and contributions made in the development of the tourism industry.

Prerequisite: PRT 152

Typically offered in Spring only

PRT 430  Tourism, Poverty, and Health  (3 credit hours)  

Students will learn about the potential role of tourism in fueling equitable development and human health in destination communities, and about the factors that lead to negative social and economic tourism impacts. Students will learn about equitable community development, human health and well-being principles; and about how micro-entrepreneurs and host communities react to the challenges and opportunities posted by tourism development. The course is grounded in scholarly knowledge and is also unreservedly engaged in real life; accordingly, students will work on new ways to help under-resourced individuals pursue dignified livelihoods through tourism. Fieldwork outside of class is required, with a fee of $50.00. PRT majors and PRT minors only.

Typically offered in Fall only

PRT 442  Recreation and Park Interpretive Services  (3 credit hours)  

Interpretation is a form of communication in which the technical language of natural sciences and related fields is translated in a way connects people's hearts and minds to a resource. Commonly, interpretation occurs at local, county, state and national parks; state and national forests; other protected areas; as well as natural and cultural history centers and sites. However, these skills can be transferred to any setting in which you are seeking to connect people's hearts and minds to a resource. This course is designed to provide you with fundamental knowledge of environmental and cultural interpretation, as well as develop your practical skills in providing interpretive services. Students will enroll in the National Association of Interpretation Certified Interpretive Guide course and have opportunity to apply for certification ($125 fee). Certification is optional. Students completing this course will also earn a minimum of 20 hours toward NC Environmental Education Certification.

Prerequisite: Junior standing.

Typically offered in Spring only

PRT 449/ES 449  Human Dimensions of Natural Resources in Australia/New Zealand  (3 credit hours)  

This 3.5 week study abroad program examines human dimensions of natural and environmental conservation in Australia. The course will involve an orientation and lectures from faculty at James Cook University. Students wills explore the natural environments in Australia including Great Barrier Reed, Tropical Rainforest and Outback and be introduced to Australian culture and history through interactions with communities. Educational travel, active participation, lectures, seminars, and reflective exercises facilitate learning to improve understanding of relationships between human societies and the natural environment. Students must pay program fees, airfare, some meals, and incidentals.

Corequisite: PRT 450

GEP Global Knowledge, GEP Interdisciplinary Perspectives

Typically offered in Summer only

PRT 450/ES 450  Sustaining Natural Resources in Australia/New Zealand  (3 credit hours)  

This 3.5 week study abroad program will examine issues related to natural history and environmental conservation in Australia. This course will involve an orientation and lectures from Australian university faculty. Students will explore natural environments in Australia including the Great Barrier Reef, Tropical Rainforest and Outback; learn about sustainable development and protection of the natural environment through educational travel, field trips, active participation, lecture presentations and seminars, written assignments, research projects and reflective exercises. Students must apply through NCSU Study Abroad Office. Students must pay program fees, airfare, some meals and incidentals.

Corequisite: PRT 449

GEP Global Knowledge, GEP Interdisciplinary Perspectives

Typically offered in Summer only

PRT 451  Principles of Recreation Planning and Facility Development  (3 credit hours)  

Planning activities analyzed as decision-making processes. Identification, interpretation, evaluation and utilization of data and resources necessary for recreation planning. Planning principles applied in the analysis of proposed and existing recreation sites.

Prerequisite: PRT 358

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

PRT 454  Parks and Recreation Finance and Administration  (3 credit hours)  

Recreation and park fiscal administration, sources of finance for operating and capital expenditures, revenue activities, financial planning, budgeting, expenditure policies, auditing and planning for recreation and park services, decision-making tools, legal aspects of administration.

Prerequisite: PRT 359

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

PRT 458  Special Events Planning  (3 credit hours)  

Theoretical and applied approaches to the planning of special events. Components and considerations of event planning, applied to various recreational settings. Participation in a community special event is required. Attendance at professional conference also required.

Prerequisite: PRT 358

Typically offered in Spring only

PRT 466  Sport Finance and Economics  (3 credit hours)  

Concepts include sources of revenue for financing, principles of budgeting, spreadsheet utilization, and financial management of sport facilities and enterprises. Additional topics include fundraising principles and methods, economic impact principles and their application to sport venues and events, economic theory applied to sport manufacturing, service industries, professional sports, stadiums and arenas, intercollegiate sports, and the sport club industry.

Prerequisite: Sport Management and PRT Majors, PRT 266, ACC 210, and (ARE 201 or EC 201 or EC 205)

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

PRT 475  Recreation and Park Internship  (8 credit hours)  

Provides prospective park, recreation and leisure service professionals a 400-hour (ten week) learning experience in a selected agency or organization, under the joint supervision of a qualified manager and a university internship supervisor. Individualized/Independent Study and Research courses require a Course Agreement for Students Enrolled in Non-Standard Courses be completed by the student and faculty member prior to registration by the department.

Prerequisite: PRT 350, PRT 358, PRT 359, PRT 375, PRT 380, 100 hours of approved work experience.

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

PRT 476  Sport Marketing  (3 credit hours)  

Fundamental marketing principles and concepts related to the sport industry. Overview of marketing mix, marketing strategies and the bases of segmentation, sponsorship, licensing, fundraising and merchandising. Special emphasis on the marketing of sport and its strong relationship to research. Credit will not be given for both PRT 476 and PRT 407.

Prerequisite: PRT 486, Sport Management or PRT Majors, PRT 266

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

PRT 478  Sustainable Sport Facility Management  (3 credit hours)  

In this course, students will examine the development and management of sport facilities, paying particular attention to environmental concerns and the sustainability of the sport stadia. Specifically, the course first focuses on the 3 E's of sustainability (Environment, Equity, Economics) and learn about sustainable systems. From this underpinning, the course is divided into two main frameworks: 1. Development of sport facilities; and 2. Sport facility operations. Each part of the course is enhanced by guest lectures from industry experts and hands on learning experiences.

R: Sport Management Majors only

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

PRT 491  Special Topics in Recreation  (1-3 credit hours)  

Investigation and analysis of a problem associated with recreation resources.

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

PRT 493  Independent Study in Parks, Recreation, and Tourism Management  (1-6 credit hours)  

Independent Study for Parks, Recreation, and Tourism Management students at the advanced level developed under the direction of a faculty member. Individualized/Independent Study and Research courses require a "Course Agreement for Students Enrolled in Non-Standard Courses" be completed by the student and faculty member prior to registration by the department.

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

PRT 494  Independent Study in Parks, Recreation, and Tourism Management  (1-6 credit hours)  

Independent Study for Parks, Recreation, and Tourism Management students at the advanced level developed under the direction of a faculty member. Individualized/Independent Study and Research courses require a "Course Agreement for Students Enrolled in Non-Standard Courses" be completed by the student and faculty member prior to registration by the department.

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

PRT 500  Conceptual Foundations of Recreation  (3 credit hours)  

Exploration of the conceptual foundations of leisure, recreations, sport, play, and work, the history of ideas in the field and the relationships of these ideas to contemporary professional and social problems. Restricted to PRTM masters and students and others by consent of the instructor. This course will be offered in an accelerated seven-week format.

Restriction: PRT Grad Students Only

Typically offered in Fall only

PRT 501  Research Methods In Recreation  (3 credit hours)  

Examination and understanding of advanced scientific investigative methods in their application toward explaining recreation and leisure behavioral phenomena and for resolution of recreation management problems.

Restricted to: Graduate-level Statistics

Typically offered in Spring only

PRT 503  Advanced Fiscal Management for Parks, Recreation, Tourism and Sport Organizations  (3 credit hours)  

This course is intended to provide students with advanced concepts of fiscal management as applied to the unique industries of parks, recreation, tourism and sport management. Emphasis will be placed on understanding how the receipt, disbursement, and utilization of funds can foster sustainability within these types of organizations. Additionally, this course will focus on developing the skills necessary to apply ethical financial analysis principles through financial risk management. This course is restricted to PRTM masters students and others by consent of the instructor. This course will be offered online in an accelerated seven-week format.

Typically offered in Fall only

PRT 504  Data Management and Applications in Parks, Recreation, Tourism and Sport Management  (3 credit hours)  

Introduction to procedures and techniques used in research and evaluation in parks, recreation, sport, and tourism settings to solve management problems. The course emphasizes techniques for data collection, management, analysis, and communication of research findings. This course is restricted to PRTM masters students and others by consent of the instructor. This course will be offered online in an accelerated seven-week format.

Typically offered in Fall only

PRT 505  GIS and Spatial Analysis in PRTS  (3 credit hours)  

Introduction to spatial reasoning and spatial analysis as implemented in geographic information systems (GIS) to perform evaluation and research in parks, recreation, tourism, and sport settings. This course is restricted to PRTM master's degree students or others with consent of the instructor.

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing and MPRTSM

Typically offered in Spring only

PRT 506  Organizational Behavior and Leadership in Parks, Recreation, Tourism and Sport  (3 credit hours)  

This course will focus on the organization and administration of public, private and not-for-profit park, recreation, tourism and sports (PRTS) agencies. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the structural, human, political, and cultural factors that impact organizational efficiency and effectiveness - specifically focusing on these environments. The course will primarily address issues related to organization, management, ethical leadership, human personnel supervision, theory, and research. This course is restricted to PRTM master's degree students or by permission of instructor. This course will be offered online in an accelerated seven-week format.

Typically offered in Fall only

PRT 507  Strategic Marketing Management in Parks, Recreation, Tourism and Sport Organizations  (3 credit hours)  

This course examines the theoretical principles and applications of marketing and promotion strategies for recreational sport and key marketing concepts and strategies using case studies. There is significant discussion on marketing activation, leveraging strategies of sport/event sponsor brands/ companies, and developing a marketing plan. This course is restricted to PRTM master's degree students and others with the content of the instructor. This course will be offered online in an accelerated seven-week format.

Typically offered in Spring only

PRT 508  Risk Management for Parks, Recreation, Tourism and Sport Organizations  (3 credit hours)  

This course explores risk management in PRTs organizations with an emphasis on ethical managerial strategies. The topics include legal concepts related to specific managerial functions, impacts on functions in recreation environments that result in more efficient and successful operation and protection for the organization. In addition, effective strategies for risk management related to facilitating active-healthy lifestyles and sustainable communities will be explored. This course is restricted to PRT master's degree students and others by consent of the instructor. This course will be offered online in an accelerated seven-week format.

Typically offered in Summer only

PRT 509  Program Evaluation for Parks, Recreation, Tourism and Sport Organizations  (3 credit hours)  

This course focuses on the development of a working knowledge of the rationale, procedures and tools for conducting sound program evaluation assessments in parks, recreation, tourism, and sport organizations. Effective skills for mastering comprehensive program evaluation strategies including formative, summative, and knowledge building strategies are taught. Students explore social science methods specifically appropriate for evaluation of youth programs.

Typically offered in Summer only

PRT 510  Active Recreation and Community Health  (3 credit hours)  

This course focuses on the association of active recreation in communities and community health. Students explore individual, social, community, environmental, and policy factors that affect community health and the contribution of recreation and park programs and facilities. This is a seven week course.

Typically offered in Spring only

PRT 511  Sport and Entertainment Venue Management - Facilities  (3 credit hours)  

In this course, students will examine the management of sport facilities, paying particular attention to environmental concerns and the sustainability of the event venue. Specifically, we will first focus on the three E's of sustainability (Environment, Equity, Economics) and learn about sustainable systems. From this underpinning, the class will be divided into six critical topic areas of sport facility managment: 1. History and role of venues 2. Venue Safety and Security 3. Venue Policy and Procedures 4. Food and Beverage Operations 5. Transportation and Parking Management 6. Ancillary Revenue Sources

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

PRT 512  Sport and Entertainment Venue Management - Operations and Services  (3 credit hours)  

A thorough background on operations and services is essential for sport and entertainment venue managers. This course examines venue management by covering essential managerial functions. These include management and human resources, customer service and crowd management, managing volunteers, scheduling and booking venues, and ticket office operations.

Typically offered in Spring only

PRT 550  Human Behavior and the Environment  (3 credit hours)  

This course helps students understand the variety of cognitive, social, affective, and environmental factors that influence human behavior in natural resource contexts, with an emphasis on nature-based recreation experiences and conservation behaviors. Students will explore behavioral models from different disciplines, examine pathways to promote behavior change, and assess implications for park management, environmental stewardship, and natural resource conservation.

Typically offered in Fall only

PRT 555  Environmental Impacts of Recreation and Tourism  (3 credit hours)  

Understanding of environmental impacts of recreation and tourism, and different methods for assessing and managing such impacts. Examination of the scientific and management literature and application of impact assessment techniques.

Typically offered in Fall only

PRT 560  Theory and Practice of Partnerships for Conservation and Community Sustainability  (3 credit hours)  

Understanding of collaborative processes and the role of partnerships in public land management, community based conservation, tourism development, and community health and recreation. Examination of literature and evaluation of collaboration and partnerships in practice.

Typically offered in Spring only

PRT 595  Special Topics In Recreation Resources  (1-6 credit hours)  

Special topics in various aspects of recreation resources developed under direction of a graduate faculty member on a tutorial basis. Subjects offered under this course listing also used to test and develop new courses.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

PRT 610  Special Topics In Recreation Resources  (1-6 credit hours)  

Special topics in various aspects of recreation resources developed under direction of a graduate faculty member on a tutorial basis. Subjects offered under this course listing also used to test and develop new courses.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

PRT 620  Recreation Resources Problems  (1-4 credit hours)  

Assigned or selected problems in field of recreation administration, planning, supervision, maintenance, operations, financing or program. Special research problems selected on basis of interest of students and supervised by members of graduate faculty.

Prerequisite: Advanced Undergraduate standing or Graduate standing

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

PRT 650  Professional Electronic Portfolio for Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management  (1 credit hours)  

Students will develop a personalized digital portfolio of the work completed in all required courses in the Masters of Parks, Recreation & Tourism Management program. The portfolio should include evidence, reflection, and critical analysis of core competencies achieved throughout their academic course of study. This course must be taken during a student's last semester after he or she has completed all the required courses.

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing and PRT 500 and PRT 504 and PRT 505 and PRT 506 and PRT 508 and PRT 503 and PRT 507.

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

PRT 685  Master's Supervised Teaching  (1-3 credit hours)  

Teaching experience under the mentorship of faculty who assist the student in planning for the teaching assignment, observe and provide feedback to the student during the teaching assignment, and evaluate the student upon completion of the assignment.

Prerequisite: Master's student

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

PRT 693  Master's Supervised Research  (1-9 credit hours)  

Instruction in research and research under the mentorship of a member of the Graduate Faculty.

Prerequisite: Master's student

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

PRT 695  Master's Thesis Research  (1-9 credit hours)  

Thesis Research

Prerequisite: Master's student

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

PRT 696  Summer Thesis Research  (1 credit hours)  

For graduate students whose programs of work specify no formal course work during a summer session and who will be devoting full time to thesis research.

Prerequisite: Master's student

Typically offered in Summer only

PRT 699  Master's Thesis Preparation  (1-9 credit hours)  

For students who have completed all credit hour requirements and full-time enrollment for the master's degree and are writing and defending their thesis. Credits Arranged

Prerequisite: Master's student

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

PRT 700  Advanced Theories of Leisure  (3 credit hours)  

This course is designed to examine theory as it can be applied to understanding of leisure behavior and parks, recreation, and tourism management research. The goal is to provide a foundation for identifying, evaluating, and applying theoretical perspectives to PRTM research. Students are expected to engage in a critical analysis of theory in PRTM. Ph.D. student

Typically offered in Fall only

PRT 701  Research Methods in Parks, Recreation, & Tourism Management  (3 credit hours)  

The overall goal of this course is to provide students with a background in advanced social science research methods commonly used in PRTM-related fields as well as strategies for planning, designing, evaluating, and applying research using the social science framework. This course will also be designed in a way to guide students through the phases of the research design and to develop a research proposal.

Completion of PRT 500/700 or concurrently enrolled; Graduate Status

Typically offered in Fall only

PRT 705  Qualitative Research Methods in Conservation & Community Sustainability  (3 credit hours)  

Examination of qualitative research methods and designs in the contexts of human dimensions of natural resources, equitable and sustainable tourism development, and community health and well-being, including data generation, organization, analysis, quality and presentation. A research project will be conducted with the application of qualitative data organization software.

P: Doctoral student status, or with consent of instructor.

Typically offered in Spring only

PRT 730  Tourism, Community Health, and Sustainability  (3 credit hours)  

In this course students will examine the potential role of tourism in mitigating or exacerbating health disparities and environmental degradation in rural poor areas. The course endorses an academic ethic of engaged scholarship. Students will be asked to make original contributions to participatory development scholarship, and they will be asked to collaborate with community partners on an applied project addressing tourism, health disparities and environmental degradation in an economically depressed rural community. Consistent with the engaged nature of this course, we will travel to rural communities to meet stakeholders, collect data, and provide coaching/training to tourism micro-entrepreneurs.

Typically offered in Spring only

PRT 795  Special Topics in Recreation Resources  (1-6 credit hours)  

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

PRT 801  Doctoral Seminar in Parks, Recreation and Tourism Research  (1 credit hours)  

Research studies, scientific articles and progress reports on research effects presented and critically evaluated. Each student pursuing a doctoral degree is expected to take this offering four times for one hour of credit each time.

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

PRT 810  Special Topics In Recreation Resources  (1-6 credit hours)  

Special topics in various aspects of recreation resources developed under direction of a graduate faculty member on a tutorial basis. Subjects offered under this course listing also used to test and develop new courses.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

PRT 885  Doctoral Supervised Teaching  (1-3 credit hours)  

Teaching experience under the mentorship of faculty who assist the student in planning for the teaching assignment, observe and provide feedback to the student during the teaching assignment, and evaluate the student upon completion of the assignment.

Prerequisite: Doctoral student

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

PRT 893  Doctoral Supervised Research  (1-9 credit hours)  

Instruction in research and research under the mentorship of a member of the Graduate Faculty.

Prerequisite: Doctoral student

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

PRT 895  Doctoral Dissertation Research  (1-9 credit hours)  

Dissertation research.

Prerequisite: Doctoral student

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

PRT 896  Summer Dissertation Research  (1 credit hours)  

For graduate students whose programs of work specify no formal course work during a summer session and who will be devoting full time to thesis research.

Prerequisite: Doctoral student

Typically offered in Summer only

PRT 899  Doctoral Dissertation Preparation  (1-9 credit hours)  

For students who have completed all credit hour, full-time enrollment, preliminary examination, and residency requirements for the doctoral degree, and are writing and defending their dissertations.

Prerequisite: Doctoral student

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer