Foreign Languages (FL)

FL 216  Art and Society in France  (3 credit hours)  

An overview of the visual arts in France, defined broadly, and their relationship to French society and culture: painting, architecture, photography, cinema, book production, gardens, fashion, food, television, popular culture, and mass media, including the Internet. The principal themes of the course are how France's cultural heritage is embodied in its rich tradition of visual expression and how artists' visual expressions have either served to represent, glorify, or critique the nation.

GEP Global Knowledge, GEP Visual and Performing Arts

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

FL 219/ENG 219  Studies in Great Works of Non-Western Literature  (3 credit hours)  

Readings, in English translation, or non-Western literary masterpieces from the beginnings of literacy in the Middle East, Asia, and Africa to the modern period, including excerpts from texts such as the Upanishads, the Ramayana, the Sundiata, Gilgamesh, A Thousand and One Nights, and the Quran and such authors as Confucius, Oe Kenzaburo, Omar Khayyam, Rumi, and Amos Oz.

GEP Global Knowledge, GEP Humanities

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

FL 220/ENG 220  Studies in Great Works of Western Literature  (3 credit hours)  

Readings, in English translation, of Western literary masterpieces, from the beginnings of literacy in the Middle East and Europe towards the present, including such authors as Homer, Sophocles, Virgil, Ovid, Augustine, Dante, Machiavelli, Shakespeare, Cervantes, Moliere, Voltaire, Goethe, Austen, Flaubert, Dickinson, Tolstoy, Kafka, and Woolf. Credit will not be given for both ENG/FL 220 and either ENG/FL 221 or ENG/FL 222.

Restricton: Credit is not allowed for both ENG 220 and ENG 221 or ENG 222.

GEP Global Knowledge, GEP Humanities

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

FL 221/ENG 221  Literature of the Western World I  (3 credit hours)  

Readings from English translations of Biblical, Classical, Medieval, and Early Renaissance literature, including works by such authors as Homer, Plato, Virgil, Ovid, St. Paul, St. Augustine, Marie de France, and Dante. Credit is not allowed for both ENG 221 and ENG 220.

Restriction: Credit is not allowed for both ENG 221 and ENG 220.

GEP Global Knowledge, GEP Humanities

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

FL 222/ENG 222  Literature of the Western World II  (3 credit hours)  

Readings from English translations of Renaissance, Neo-Classical, Romantic, and Early Modern literature, emphasizing the cultures of continental Europe from the Renaissance to 1900, and including such authors as Petrarch, Erasmus, Rabelais, Machiavelli, Shakespeare, Moliere, Voltaire, Rousseau, Goethe, Flaubert, and Tolstoy. Credit is not allowed for both ENG 220 and ENG 222.

Restriction: Credit is not allowed for both ENG 222 and ENG 220.

GEP Global Knowledge, GEP Humanities

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

FL 223/ENG 223  Contemporary World Literature I  (3 credit hours)  

Twentieth-century literature of some of the following cultures: Russian, Eastern European, Western European, Latin American, Canadian, Australian.

GEP Global Knowledge, GEP Humanities

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

FL 224/ENG 224  Contemporary World Literature II  (3 credit hours)  

Twentieth-century literature of some of the following cultures: Asian, Middle Eastern, African, Caribbean, Native-American.

GEP Global Knowledge, GEP Humanities

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

FL 246/ENG 246  Literature of the Holocaust  (3 credit hours)  

Fictional and nonfictional versions of the Holocaust, focusing on themes of survival, justice, theology, and the limits of human endurance.

GEP Global Knowledge, GEP Humanities

Typically offered in Fall only

FL 275/ENG 275  Literature and War  (3 credit hours)  

A geographical and thematic examination of war and questions it raises, as reflected in selected writings from, Homer, Sophocles, Japan's Tale of the Heike, Shakespeare, The Bhagavad-Gita, Keegan, Kipling, Graham Green, Mulden, Michael Herr, Dexter Filkins, Lucius Shepherd as well as writers on Just War and Deterrence Theory, and military science.

GEP Global Knowledge, GEP Humanities

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

FL 295  Special Topics in Foreign Languages and/or Literatures  (1-6 credit hours)  

A special projects course on topics to be determined as needed in the departmental program.

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

FL 298  Independent Study in Foreign Language or Literature  (1-6 credit hours)  

Individualized study in a foreign language or literature. Topic, mode of study and credit hours to be determined in consultation with the faculty member supervising work. Individualized/Independent Study and Research courses require a "Course Agreement for Students Enrolled in Non-Standard Courses" be completed by the student and faculty member prior to registration by the department.

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

FL 299/ED 299  Field Experience for 21st Century Teaching  (1 credit hours)  

This course has a required fieldwork component in local K-12 schools, and students are responsible for their own transportation to and from the schools. Students are required to purchase internship liability insurance to participate in this course. Contact University Insurance & Risk Management for details on acquiring the insurance and the current charge. This course is restricted to Foreign Language Education majors.

Prerequisite: ECI 204 and ED 204

Typically offered in Spring only

FL 392/ENG 392  Major World Author  (3 credit hours)  

Intensive study in English, of the writings of one (or two) author(s) from outside the English and American traditions. Sample subjects: Homer, Virgil and Ovid, Lady Murasaki, Marie de France and Christine de Pizan, Dante, Cervantes, Goethe, Balzacand Flaubert, Kafka, Proust, Lessing and Gordimer, Borges and Marquez, Neruda, Achebe, Soyinka, Calvino, Walcott and Naipaul. Topics will vary from semester to semester.May be repeated for credit with new topic.

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and above

GEP Global Knowledge, GEP Humanities

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

FL 393/ENG 393  Studies in Literary Genre  (3 credit hours)  

Concentrated treatment of one literary genre, such as the epic, the lyric, the drama, satire, romance, autobiography, the essay, the novel, or the short story. Treatment of materials from several national or ethnic cultures and several periods. All readings in English. Course may be taken three times for credit. Course may be taken 3 times in different genres.

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and above

GEP Global Knowledge, GEP Humanities

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

FL 394/ENG 394  Studies in World Literature  (3 credit hours)  

Study of a subject in world literature: for example, African literature, Asian literature, Hispanic literature, East European literature, Comedy, the Epic, the Lyric, Autobiography, the Faust legend, or Metamorphosis. Subjects vary according to availability of faculty. Readings in English translation.

Restriction: Sophomore Standing and Above

GEP Global Knowledge, GEP Humanities

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

FL 395  Study Abroad Programs  (1-3 credit hours)  

Specific category of courses involving language and/or culture taught in foreign countries through the Department Study Abroad Program.

FL 406/ENG 406  Modernism  (3 credit hours)  

Review and discuss the International Modernist movement in literature, from its nineteenth-century origins to its culmination in the early twentieth century. Identify and discuss definitions of modernity, as embodied in a variety of genres. Discuss Modernist texts within a variety of cultures that produced them.

GEP Global Knowledge, GEP Humanities

Typically offered in Fall only

FL 407/ENG 407  Postmodernism  (3 credit hours)  

Study literary expressions of postmodernism, from its origins in the Modernist movement through its culmination in the later decades of the twentieth century and after. Examine post modernity, as embodied in a variety of genres. Situate postmodernist texts within a variety of cultures that have produced them.

GEP Global Knowledge, GEP Humanities

Typically offered in Spring only

FL 424/FL 524  Linguistics for ESL Professionals  (3 credit hours)  

Study of the diachronic nature of language and the phonological, morphological, syntactic, and semantic features of English in relation to other world language groups. Application of linguistic principles to the ESL classroom. Analysis of common errors in grammar due to first language interference. Discussion of teaching strategies based on current research in second-language acquisition. Credit will not be given for both FL 424 and FL 524.

Typically offered in Spring only

FL 427/ECI 427/ECI 527/FL 527  Methods and Materials in Teaching English as a Second Language  (3 credit hours)  

Methodologies and current approaches to teaching English as a Second Language. Techniques and strategies for teaching reading, writing, listening, speaking and culture. Selection, adaptation, and creation of instructional materials for various levels of proficiency and teaching situations. Evaluation and assessment of written and oral language proficiency through standardized and non-standardized assessment tools. Students cannot receive credit for both FL/ECI 427 and FL/ECI 527.

Typically offered in Fall only

FL 436/ECI 436/FL 536/ECI 536  Perspectives on English as a New Language  (3 credit hours)  

Examination of the complexity of multiculturalism in American society and the challenges faced by immigrant families in adapting to U.S. institutions. Emphasis on understanding historical, legal, cultural and pedagogical issues with respect to learning English as a new language [ENL]. No credit given for both FL/ECI 436 and FL/ECI 536.

Typically offered in Fall only

FL 440  Internship in Teaching English as a Second Language  (3 credit hours)  

Skills and techniques required in teaching ESL in a public school setting. 15 hours of classroom observation and 30 hours in direct instruction. Demonstration of competencies essential for teaching ESL. Individualized/Independent Study and Research co

Prerequisite: Admission to ESL Licensure Program, Corequisite: Teacher Licensure in any primary area

Typically offered in Fall and Spring

FL 441  Strategies and Curriculum Design in Teaching English as a Foreign Language (TEFL)  (3 credit hours)  

This course provides an overview of three main aspects of teaching English as a Foreign Language: planning, instructing, and assessing. Students will examine the most common types of curricula and practice syllabus design, lesson planning, and assessments. They will explore the characteristics of different types of learners (e.g., young learners, post-secondary adults, immigrants, etc.) and their motivation for learning English. Students will practice a variety of communicative, collaborative activities for all levels and contexts.

P: FL 427 (Methods and Materials in Teaching ESL)

Typically offered in Spring only

FL 492  Senior Seminar in Foreign Languages & Literatures  (3 credit hours)  

Senior seminar for foreign language majors with concentration in non-European / less-commonly taught languages. Focus on recent trends in scholarship, career guidance, senior research projects or equivalent. Conducted in English. Students will be required to provide a detailed summary of their project in the language of their concentration.

Prerequisite: FLJ 301 or FLC 301 or FLN 301 or FLA 301

Typically offered in Spring only

FL 495/FL 595  Special Topics in Foreign Languages and Literatures  (1-6 credit hours)  

A concentrated study of a special period, author or genre to be determined as needed in the departmental program.

FL 498  Independent Study in Foreign Language or Literature  (1-6 credit hours)  

Individualized study of a foreign language or literature. Topic, mode of study, and credit hours to be determined in consultation with the faculty member supervising work. Individualized/Independent Study and Research courses require a "Course Agreement for Students Enrolled in Non-Standard Courses" be completed by the student and faculty member prior to registration by the department.

Typically offered in Fall, Spring, and Summer

FL 505/ECI 505  Issues and Trends in Foreign Language Education: Theory & Practice  (3 credit hours)  

An exploration of theory and practice issues related to foreign language teaching. Inquiry into proficiency-oriented instruction, innovative methodological approaches, the National Standards and learning scenarios, integrating culture, options for testing and assessment, content-based instruction, the role of grammar in second language acquisition, teaching foreign language students with learning disabilities, and Foreign Language in the Elementary School (FLES) in North Carolina. Students will examine case studies related to these topics and engage in a classroom action research project.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing

Typically offered in Fall and Summer

FL 506  Instructional Technology in Foreign Language Education: Addressing the Standards  (3 credit hours)  

Hands-on experience in appropriately selecting and applying a number of instructional technologies to foreign language teaching and learning in relation to the current National Standards. Analysis and use of effective technology tools including hardware, software, and courseware. Emphasis will be on the application of Technology-Enhanced Language Learning (TELL) as it integrates the National Standards' goals of Communication, Cultures, Connections, Comparisons, and Communities.

Restriction: Graduate standing; NC Initial/A licensure in French, Spanish or ESL

Typically offered in Summer only

FL 507  College Teaching of Foreign Languages  (3 credit hours)  

Principles of second language acquisition and foreign language pedagogy. Examination of problematic concepts in teaching Spanish and French. Thorough treatment of instructional technology appropriate to foreign language teaching and learning. Regular

Prerequisite: Graduate status

Typically offered in Fall only

FL 508  Second Language Acquisition Research: Interlanguage Development  (3 credit hours)  

This course introduces students to the objectives, methods, and findings of research investigating how classroom learners acquire French and Spanish as a second language. It examines specific features of French and Spanish interlanguage including: grammatical gender, copular ser/estar and idiomatic uses of etre/avoir, pronominalization, verbal systems, and longitudinal/cross-sections studies of interlanguage development. Course content bridges the gap between second language acquisition research, foreign language teaching methodology courses, and curriculum implementation. Graduate standing or consent of instructor required.

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing or Permission of the Instructor

Typically offered in Spring only

FL 524/FL 424  Linguistics for ESL Professionals  (3 credit hours)  

Study of the diachronic nature of language and the phonological, morphological, syntactic, and semantic features of English in relation to other world language groups. Application of linguistic principles to the ESL classroom. Analysis of common errors in grammar due to first language interference. Discussion of teaching strategies based on current research in second-language acquisition. Credit will not be given for both FL 424 and FL 524.

Typically offered in Spring only

FL 527/FL 427/ECI 427/ECI 527  Methods and Materials in Teaching English as a Second Language  (3 credit hours)  

Methodologies and current approaches to teaching English as a Second Language. Techniques and strategies for teaching reading, writing, listening, speaking and culture. Selection, adaptation, and creation of instructional materials for various levels of proficiency and teaching situations. Evaluation and assessment of written and oral language proficiency through standardized and non-standardized assessment tools. Students cannot receive credit for both FL/ECI 427 and FL/ECI 527.

Typically offered in Fall only

FL 535  Teaching Academic Writing to Multilingual Learners  (3 credit hours)  

Students will explore current theory and research in second language writing. Topics include intercultural rhetoric, second language writing curriculum, first language grammar interference, and the development of academic vocabulary. Students will learn innovative teaching strategies and activities that help multilingual writers practice writing across genres and disciplines.

Restriction: Graduate Standing

Typically offered in Fall only

FL 536/ECI 536/FL 436/ECI 436  Perspectives on English as a New Language  (3 credit hours)  

Examination of the complexity of multiculturalism in American society and the challenges faced by immigrant families in adapting to U.S. institutions. Emphasis on understanding historical, legal, cultural and pedagogical issues with respect to learning English as a new language [ENL]. No credit given for both FL/ECI 436 and FL/ECI 536.

Typically offered in Fall only

FL 539/ENG 539  Seminar In World Literature  (3 credit hours)  

Rotating topics in world literature, including treatment of the subject's theoretical or methodological framework. Possible subjects: colonialism and literature; orality and literature; the Renaissance; the Enlightenment; translation; comparison ofNorth and South American literatures; African literary traditions; post-modernism and gender. Readings in English (original languages encouraged but not required).

Typically offered in Spring only

FL 541/ENG 541  Literary and Cultural Theory  (3 credit hours)  

A survey of literary theory in the 20th century from New Criticism to postmodernism. Examines the virtues and pitfalls of these approaches to the study of culture and literature. A course on issues, concepts, theorists and the sociohistorical and political context in which the theorists are writing. Taught in English. No formal pre-requisites. However, students who have not had advanced literature will be disadvantaged.

Typically offered in Fall only

FL 595/FL 495  Special Topics in Foreign Languages and Literatures  (1-6 credit hours)  

A concentrated study of a special period, author or genre to be determined as needed in the departmental program.